How Many Calories In 2 Hot Dogs With Buns

Calories in 1 Frankfurter or Hot Dog on Bun and Nutrition Facts

Calories in a serving250 percent of the Daily Values Amount per serving * Total fat: 14.98g19 percent saturated fat: 5.617g Total fat: 14.98g TransFat-Polyunsaturated Fat2.042g (28 percent TransFat-Polyunsaturated Fat) Monounsaturated Fatty Acids: 7.03 g Cholesterol24mg Sodium 717mg (8% of total sodium) 31% of the population Carbohydrates in total: 18.9g Dietary Fiber (0.7g): 7 per cent 2.29 grams of sugar (3% of total calories) Protein9.06g Vitamin D-Calcium 56 milligrams 4 percent Iron 1.77 milligrams Vitamin A8mcg10 percent Potassium116mg2 percent Potassium 100 milligrams of Vitamin C0 percent * The percent Daily Value (DV) of a nutrient in a portion of food indicates how much that nutrient contributes to a person’s daily diet.

For general nutrition guidance, 2,000 calories per day is recommended.

FatSecret Platform API is the source of this information.

Calorie Breakdown:Carbohydrate (30%)Fat (55%)Protein (15%)

The following calculations were made using an RDI of 2000 calories: What is my Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) for this supplement?

Photos

There are250 caloriesin 1 Frankfurter or Hot Dog on Bun.
Calorie breakdown:55% fat, 31% carbs, 15% protein.

Other Common Serving Sizes:

Serving Size Calories
1 oz 83
1 miniature 168
1 frankfurter on bun 250
100 g 294

Related Types of Hot Dogs:

Beef Frankfurter or Hot Dog
Lowfat Beef Frankfurter or Hot Dog
Frankfurter or Hot Dog
Fat Free Frankfurter or Hot Dog
Frankfurter or Hot Dog with Cheese on Bun
Frankfurter or Hot Dog with Catsup and/or Mustard on Bun
view more hot dogs nutritional info

Related Types of Sausages:

Country Style Pork Sausage
Fresh Pork Sausage
Chicken Sausage
Turkey Sausage
Italian Sausage
Beef Sausage
view more sausages nutritional info

See Also:

Chicken Frankfurter or Hot Dog on Bun
Frankfurter or Hot Dog with Chili on Bun
Frankfurter or Hot Dog with Chili and Cheese on Bun
Frankfurter or Hot Dog with Chili (No Bun)
Frankfurter, Wiener or Hot Dog
view more results

Eat This Much, your personal diet assistant

A 2000-calorie recommended daily intake was used in this calculation. In what amounts should I consume on a daily basis (RDI)?

Nutrition Facts
For a Serving Size of (g)
How many calories are in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of calories in Hot Dog with Bun:Calories Calories from Fat(%)
% Daily Value *
How much fat is in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of fat in Hot Dog with Bun:Total Fat
How much saturated fat is in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of saturated fat in Hot Dog with Bun:Saturated fat
How much cholesterol is in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of cholesterol in Hot Dog with Bun:Cholesterol
How much sodium is in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of sodium in Hot Dog with Bun:Sodium
How many carbs are in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of carbs in Hot Dog with Bun:Carbohydrates
How many net carbs are in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of net carbs in Hot Dog with Bun:Net carbs
How much sugar is in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of sugar in Hot Dog with Bun:Sugar
How much fiber is in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of fiber in Hot Dog with Bun:Fiber
How much protein is in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of protein in Hot Dog with Bun:Protein
Vitamins and minerals
How much Calcium is in Hot Dog with Bun? Amount of Calcium in Hot Dog with Bun:Calcium
Fatty acids
Amino acids
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs.

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Calories in Hot dog with bun and the fixings – Calorie, Fat, Carb, Fiber, and Protein Info

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Calories 354.7
Total Fat 19.0 g
Saturated Fat 7.2 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1.6 g
Monounsaturated Fat 8.8 g
Cholesterol 30.2 mg
Sodium 1,325.6 mg
Potassium 174.6 mg
Total Carbohydrate 34.1 g
Dietary Fiber 1.7 g
Sugars 9.5 g
Protein 10.9 g
Vitamin A 6.8 %
Vitamin B-12 17.8 %
Vitamin B-6 5.7 %
Vitamin C 5.4 %
Vitamin D 5.1 %
Vitamin E 4.4 %
Calcium 7.8 %
Copper 11.9 %
Folate 14.0 %
Iron 15.6 %
Magnesium 5.6 %
Manganese 10.6 %
Niacin 16.1 %
Pantothenic Acid 3.2 %
Phosphorus 12.8 %
Riboflavin 13.6 %
Selenium 21.4 %
Thiamin 13.4 %
Zinc 11.8 %

In this table, the percent daily values (%DV) are calculated on the basis of a 2,000 calorie diet. Depending on your calorie requirements, your daily values may be greater or fewer than the recommended amounts.

Calories per Ingredient

The following items were selected from our food nutrition database and utilized in the nutrition calculations for this dish. Per serving of Hot dog with bread and condiments, there are 188 calories in 1 frankfurter (5 in long x 7/8 in dia, 8 per pound) of beef hot dog (188 calories per serving of Hot dog with bun and fixings) Hamburger or Hot Dog Buns are 120 calories each (1 roll) Ketchup, Heinz, and other condiments have 20 calories each (1 tbsp) Pickle Relish has 20 calories (1 tbsp) Sauerkraut has 4 calories (20 grams) Yellow Mustard has 3 calories (1 tsp or 1 packet)

Calories in a Hot Dog & Bun

Hot dogs are a mainstay of the American diet, but they may also be rich in calories. Jamie Grill/Tetra images/Getty Images is credited with this photograph.

Hot Dog Calories

Despite the fact that hot dogs are a mainstay of American culture, they can be heavy in calories. Jamie Grill/Tetra images/Getty Images is credited with this photograph.

  • 11 grams of protein
  • 8 grams of total fatty fats, which accounts for 13 percent of your recommended daily value (RDV)
  • 370 milligrams of sodium, which accounts for 16 percent of your RDV
  • 34.8 milligrams of cholesterol, which is 12 percent of your recommended daily intake
  • 3 grams of total saturated fat, which is 15 percent of your recommended daily intake

11 grams of protein; 8 grams of total fatty fats, which accounts for 13 percent of your recommended daily value (RDV); 370 milligrams of salt, which accounts for 16 percent of your RDV 34.8 milligrams of cholesterol, which is 12 percent of your recommended daily allowance; 3 grams of total saturated fat, which is 15 percent of your recommended daily allowance

  • 11 grams of protein
  • 8 grams of total fatty fats, which is 13 percent of your recommended daily value (RDV)
  • 370 milligrams of salt, which is 16 percent of your RDV
  • 34.8 milligrams of cholesterol, which is 12 percent of your recommended daily allowance
  • 3 grams of total saturated fat, which is 15 percent of your recommended daily allowance
See also:  How To Heat Up Pork Buns

Making a Healthier Hot Dog

Substitutions for a hot dog and bun might help you lose weight while eating less calories. As plant-based meals gain popularity and more people search for meat substitutes, you have more choices when it comes to your weekly grocery shopping. Among these suggestions are the following: Instead of high-fat cheeses, go for low-fat varieties. The addition of mozzarella on the top of a hot dog has been shown to have health advantages. A serving of mozzarella includes half the calories and half the fat found in the most popular hot dog cheese toppings, American and cheddar, according to the California Dairy Council.

  1. Low-carb hot dog buns should be substituted.
  2. Alternatively, if you want to include more vegetables in your diet, you may wrap the hot dog in lettuce and make a homemade hot dog wrap.
  3. These may be purchased at most supermarket shops.
  4. It also comprises 5 carbohydrates, 2 grams of sugar, and 15 milligrams of cholesterol.
  5. A turkey dog must also contain actual turkey, according to a July 2018 report from Consumer Reports, and no more than 3.5 percent of nonmeat binders or fillers.

What Are the Nutrition Facts About Hot Dogs?

Hot dogs may be found practically anyplace, usually served on a bun with ketchup, mustard, or sauerkraut on the side. They are quick and simple to prepare, and they are also reasonably priced. Hot dogs are not typically seen as healthy foods due to the fact that they are intensively processed and can include high levels of fat and salt. As a result of the increased risk of colon cancer connected with processed beef, the World Cancer Research Fund recommends that we “consume little, if any, processed meat.” There are delightful methods to enjoy your dogs without destroying your diet, despite the fact that you may not want to make it a regular practice to eat them often.

Nutrition Facts

The USDA provides the following nutritional information for one beef hot dog and bun (102g) without condiments, which is presented below.

  • 314 calories
  • 18.6 grams of fat
  • 810 milligrams of sodium
  • 24.3 grams of carbohydrates
  • 0.8 grams of fiber
  • 4 grams of sugar
  • 11.4 grams of protein

Health Benefits

Considering the size of the sausage, a standard hot dog and bun is high in calories and fat, including around 314 calories and 18.6 grams of fat. 189 calories and 16.8 grams of fat are provided by the hot dog alone (57 grams). You’ll most likely serve your hot dog on a typical white refined flour hot dog bun, which adds around 126 calories and only a little amount of fiber to the meal (0.81g).

Although a hot dog is not very nutritious, if you are a fussy eater who is having difficulty keeping calories under control, a hot dog may be a convenient method to get some calories in quickly.

Common Questions About Hot Dogs

An average-sized hot dog with bun has 314 calories and 18.6 grams of fat, which is high when considering the size of the sausage. 189 calories and 16.8 grams of fat are provided by the hot dog alone (57g). Almost certainly, you’ll serve your dog on a standard white refined flour hot dog bun, which adds around 126 calories and only a little amount of fiber (0.81g). Although not very nutritious, a hot dog might be a convenient way to get some calories in quickly if you’re a finicky eater who’s having difficulties keeping those calories under control.

Recipes and Preparation Tips

If you’re searching for some healthier alternatives to hot dogs, consider some of the following suggestions:

  • Wrap your puppy in a crescent roll to keep him warm. Crescent Hot Dogs are simple to prepare and a little more interesting than a standard hot dog
  • Just make sure you only eat one at a time. Each of the dogs has a higher fat and salt content. You may enjoy this dish with a salad that includes bright fruits and vegetables, as well as water or a large glass of sugar-free ice tea, and you’ll have a delicious lunch without consuming too many calories. Make use of a whole grain bread and pile on the vegetables. Instead of using a simple white refined hot dog bun, try using an artisan whole grain roll, which will provide you with extra fiber, antioxidants, and a little amount of protein. Dress up your dog with plenty of vegetables to provide nutrients, antioxidants, and volume to improve satiety without adding many calories. Tastes well with guacamole and spicy peppers
  • Vegetarian dogs or low-fat dogs are other good options. Vegetarian hot dogs were formerly difficult to come by, but now that most grocery shops sell many brands, you should be able to find a veggie hot dog that appeals to your tastes. However, while vegetarian hot dogs are often lower in fat and calories than traditional hot dogs, they can be prepared and served in the same manner as a regular hot dog. Keep in mind that the salt content of veggie dogs might be rather high as well.

Always keep an eye out for low-fat hot dogs that are produced with turkey or chicken rather than beef or pork. Examine the labels to see how the calorie counts, salt levels, and total fat differ from one another.

Allergies and Interactions

Instead of beef and pork, seek for low-fat hot dogs that are made entirely of turkey or chicken. Examine the labels to see how the calorie counts, salt levels, and total fat differ from one product to the others.

  1. Reduce your intake of red and processed meat. World Cancer Research Fund
  2. A Frankfurter or hot dog sandwich made with beef and served on a white bun with mustard. USDA FoodData Central is a database of USDA food data. FoodData Central, United States Department of Agriculture
  3. Frankfurter or hot dog, beef
  4. Last updated on October 30, 2020. USDA FoodData Central was last updated on October 30, 2020. A roll, white, and a hot dog bun. USDA FoodData Central was last updated on October 30, 2020. Wolk A. is a euphemism for “Wolk A.” There are several potential health risks associated with consuming red meat. Doi:10.1111/joim.12543
  5. J Intern Med, 2017
  6. 281(2):106-122
  7. Using the Nutrition Facts Label: What You Need to Know. MilkDairy Allergy is regulated by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Association of American Colleges of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. March of this year

supplementary readings

  • MILLS, C., J. KHATRI, P. MASSELL, C. ODONGEREL, and A. WEBB. It’s hardly rocket science to figure out why dietary nitrate is difficult to ‘beet’! Part II: Additional processes of the nitrate-nitrite-NO cascade, as well as its therapeutic potential. The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published an article in 2016 titled “British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology: 83(1):140-151.” Potential Health Hazards of Eating Red Meat, published online at doi:10.1111/bcp.12918
  • Wolk A. Potential Health Hazards of Eating Red Meat 106-122 in J Intern Med, which was published in 2017 as part of the 281st edition of the journal. Association between Dietary Nitrate and Nitrite Intake and Site Specific Cancer Risk: Evidence From Observational Studies, Journal of the American Institute of Medicine, doi: 10.1111/joim.12543
  • Xie L, Mo M, Jia H-X, Liang F, Yuan J, Zhu J Oncotarget, 2016
  • 7(35):56915-56932
  • Doi:10.18632/oncotarget.10917
  • Oncotarget, 2016
See also:  How To Make Two Buns

How Many Calories are in a Hot Dog?

Beef hot dogs may not be the first thing that comes to mind when we think about healthy foods. Hot dogs, contrary to popular belief, are really better for you than you may expect from these meat sticks. The average hot dog has evolved into a staple of the American experience, appearing everywhere from baseball stadiums to amusement parks to backyard barbeques and everything in between. They have a distinct smokey and savory flavor that will appeal to a wide range of palates, from young toddlers to adults.

Whatever your level of commitment to hot dogs is, or if you just indulge in them on special occasions, you may be interested in knowing the nutritional statistics and calorie content of a hot dog.

This essay discusses all you need to know about the hot dog and demonstrates what a weiner is in its truest form to you.

History of the Hot Dog

Despite the fact that hot dogs are an iconic American meal, they were not developed in the United States. They were originally from Germany, which was responsible for introducing frankfurters to the United States in the 1800s. German immigrants arrived in the United States and carried their culinary traditions with them. Charles Feltman, a German immigrant, opened a modest hot dog shop on Coney Island in the early 1900s, and his dachshund sausages quickly became famous among locals. They were given the moniker dachshund sausages because they had a form that was similar to that of the dachshund dog.

Modern variants of the sausage can be made from beef, pig, chicken, turkey, tofu, soy, or a mix of these ingredients.

Their low cost and ease of preparation make them a versatile cuisine that can be eaten practically anywhere.

July is National Hot Dog Month, during which the food cart favorite is celebrated in a variety of ways, including a hot dog eating contest, dog races, and other events, among others.

Mystery Meat

As a result of the low cost of hot dogs and the dubious business methods of the meat processing industry in the past, hot dogs have gained a poor reputation. Several anti-meat campaigners and hot dog haters have dubbed hot dogs “mystery meat sticks” or other unappetizing titles in an attempt to scare people away from eating them. Despite the fact that the meat may appear to be made of extraterrestrial components at times, you may be confident that you are eating genuine flesh. Because hot dogs are so inexpensive, some individuals may be wary of their nutritional value.

You may be confident that your hot dogs and other mysterious meat components do not include any dog.

You may have seen the pink slime videos that have been circulating on the Internet, and while the slime itself may appear unappetizing, the technique of manufacturing hot dogs and the materials used are all absolutely tasty and safe to consume.

How Hot Dogs Are Made?

Some people may be confused about how hot dogs are created as a result of all the false headlines and myths surrounding the hot dog. We take a look at the process of making hot dogs in order to be entirely open and honest about the entire process. The hot dog making process begins with carefully selected meat trimmings that vary based on the type of sausage being made. trimmings are parts of meat or poultry that are usually available in your local grocery store, despite their bad sounding name.

  • To make the meat combination, spices and curing substances are combined with the meat.
  • Some producers make use of traditional natural casings, which when eaten, provide a pleasing crunch to the product.
  • After being filled, the dogs are transported to the smokehouse where they are cooked under ideal circumstances.
  • After cooking, they are submerged in water for a short period of time to halt and preserve the cooking.
  • The contents and nutrition details, as well as the number of calories, are listed on the box to guarantee safety and transparency.

Are Hot Dogs Healthy?

While hot dogs are not the healthiest food on the planet, they are far more beneficial to your health than you may expect. Hot dogs may be a quick and economical method to obtain your protein consumption, especially with the popularity of high-protein diets and ketogenic diets on the increase. If it is covered with fatty sauces or toppings such as french fries or chili, it is almost certainly going to be unhealthy. A simple old hot dog, on the other hand, is quite healthful. One beef frank may offer up to 5 grams of protein, and there are even more healthy options that are leaner or made from plant-based protein sources available.

While nitrates may appear to be dangerous, they are really found in a variety of plants in their natural state. While hot dogs should not be the sole source of protein in your diet, they are an excellent and economical source of protein to include in your diet.

How Many Calories are in a Hot Dog?

A conventional hot dog has around 150 calories per serving, however this might vary based on the components used, the size of the hot dog, and the hot dog manufacturer. Some jumbo-size hot dogs, as well as those packed with toppings such as cheese or bacon, can have as much as 300 calories per hot dog serving. Additionally, low-fat options such as plant-based dogs, which can have as little as 100 calories, are also available.

How About Calories in a Hot Dog Bun?

Whether you choose a white bread bun or a potato bun, the hot dog bun will typically add another 100-150 calories to your meal. When combined with a restricted number of toppings, a normal hot dog is still quite low in calories, clocking in at only 270 calories. While we do not recommend having excessive numbers of hot dogs on a daily basis, hot dogs are not a bad addition to any healthy diet. The next time someone tries to humiliate you over a hot dog, simply inform them of the nutritional statistics of this tasty and famous meal.

The Bottom Line – Should You Eat Hot Dogs?

Despite the fact that hot dogs are the focus of false stories and hot dog haters, they are a well-known American delicacy that is not as horrible as everyone believes it to be. Despite the fact that it is not among the top ten healthiest meals to consume, it is a fantastic and economical source of protein that will not break the budget. It also serves as the ideal blank canvas for a variety of toppings and sauces, allowing you to channel your inner Iron Chef to full effect. Whether you are a dedicated hot dog eater or a casual ball game hot dog eater, you can rest confident that hot dogs not only have a long and illustrious history in the United States, but they are also quite healthy.

See also:  How To Make Buns Hair

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When it comes to grilling season, which do you prefer: hot dog or hamburger? There are some people who are cheering “Both!” without a doubt. For those looking to make a more healthful decision, the registered dietitian in me understands that “both” is not the best option in this situation. So, which one is the most healthful option? Before you tell the grill master what you want to eat, check out how a hamburger compares nutritionally to a hot dog.

HAMBURGER

What You Can Expect From a Standard Burger The following are some of the elements to take into consideration when making hamburgers: What is the size of it? What sort of beef is it, and where did you get it? What are you going to put on it? A standard burger weighs between 1/3 and 1/12 pound (between 6 and 8 ounces) and is produced from 85 percent lean ground beef, depending on the recipe. Even without the bread, it may contain up to 620 calories and 9 grams of saturated fat.and that’s just before the toppings.

  1. Burgers, on the other hand, are a good source of iron and zinc.
  2. A quarter-pounder provides you with 11 percent of your daily iron need and 32 percent of your daily zinc requirement in one serving.
  3. What will you be able to save as a result of your decisions?
  4. If you’re eating out and don’t want to make your own patties, you may split a standard-size burger in half and pile on the healthy toppings: lettuce and tomato, or some grilled veggies to add taste without packing on the calories.

Additionally, by using an English muffin for a normal bun, you can save another 121 calories, bringing the total calorie count for the burger and bun—er, muffin—to 300 calories.

HOT DOG

What You Get in a Typical Hot Dog (or Hamburger) Hot dogs and hot dog buns are generally smaller in size than burgers, and their lower size allows them to consume less calories than burgers. A hot dog made entirely of beef and served on a white-bread bun will only set you back 270 calories. When it comes to a supper meal, that’s a reasonable serving size (although the saturated fat is a bit high at 6 grams). Hot dogs, on the other hand, have certain disadvantages. In the first place, many are sodium bombs, containing 500 mg or more sodium per dog (a 3-ounce hamburger, on the other hand, contains roughly 375 mg-and if you’re preparing it yourself, you can use even less salt).

  • Finally, while hot dogs are often on the tiny side, you may find yourself eating more than one at a time.
  • Skip the white bun in favor of a whole-wheat one, which provides more fiber as well as higher levels of immune-boosting selenium and bone-strengthening magnesium than the white bun.
  • 3) Look for a dog with fewer than 3 grams of saturated fat if you want to make a heart-healthier decision.
  • Furthermore, with the right portion, the calories are equivalent (300 calories for the 3-ounce patty on an English muffin versus 270 for the hot dog and bun).
  • Watch this video to learn how to plan a BBQ party menu.

Calories in Wonder Hot Dog Bun

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size1bun
Amount Per Serving
Calories110Calories from Fat13
% Daily Value *
Total Fat1.5g2%
Saturated Fat0g0%
Trans Fat0g
Cholesterol0mg0%
Sodium220mg9%
Potassium0mg0%
Total Carbohydrate21g7%
Dietary Fiber0g0%
Sugars3g
Protein3g6%
Vitamin A0% Vitamin C0%
Calcium2% Iron6%
Thiamin10% Riboflavin6%
Niacin6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Here’s the Healthiest Way to Eat a Hot Dog

An Ordinary Hot Dog Consists of the Following Ingredients: As a rule, hot dogs and hot dog buns are smaller than burgers, and their smaller size allows them to consume less calories overall. 270 calories will be consumed by a hot dog made entirely of beef and served on a white bun. That’s a reasonable serving size for a supper entrée (although the saturated fat is a bit high at 6 grams). Hot dogs, on the other hand, have their drawbacks. For starters, many are sodium bombs, delivering 500 mg or more each dog (a 3-ounce hamburger, on the other hand, gives roughly 375 mg-and if you make it yourself, you may use even less salt).

  1. Final point: Because hot dogs are often on the tiny side, you may find yourself eating more than one.
  2. You may locate the healthiest hot dog in a variety of methods.
  3. Skip the white bun in favor of a whole-wheat one, which provides more fiber as well as higher levels of immune-boosting selenium and bone-strengthening magnesium than the white one.
  4. Choose a dog with fewer than 3 grams of saturated fat if you want to be more heart-healthy.
  5. Aside from that, the calories are equivalent if you consume the right quantity (300 calories for the 3-ounce patty on an English muffin versus 270 for the hot dog and bun).

Make your BBQ plate more balanced and healthful by serving it with some veggie-packed side dishes and a piece of watermelon. To learn more about how to plan a barbecue party menu, go here.

Hot dog calories

It comprises around 150 calories, 13 grams of fat, 5 grams of saturated fat, 450 milligrams of salt, and 6 grams of protein in a standard beef hot dog. So, while you may not want to consume a dozen, a single serving will not jeopardize your no-junk-food diet.

How to make a hot dog healthy

It comprises around 150 calories, 13 grams of fat, 5 grams of saturated fat, 450 milligrams of salt, and 6 grams of protein in a standard beef hot dog. Consequently, while you may not want to consume the entire case, a single serving will not jeopardize your junk-food fast.

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