How To Make Air Buns

Mom’s Air Buns (Rolls) Recipe – Food.com

This recipe for light, fluffy buns did not originate with my mother, but it is so delicious that I want to share it with all of the mothers who prepare bread. or, for that matter, anyone who bakes bread in general! I will include the original recipe, but I will admit that I now knead the dough with an ABM, and I will provide directions for this variant at the conclusion of this post. Preparation time refers to the amount of time it takes for my bread machine to complete the “dough” cycle. If you want to create 100 percent whole wheat buns (a version of this recipe that is, in my opinion, equally wonderful), I have submitted a recipe under the number recipe168802 with minor modifications.

Mom’s 100 percent Whole Grain Air Buns, recipe186744, are even delicious now that I’ve discovered a healthier alternative.

NUTRITION INFO

The serving size is 1 (1106) g, and the number of servings per recipe is 1 AMT. PER SERVING percent. PERFORMANCE ON A DAILY BASIS Nutritional Values: Calories: 171.4 Calories from Fat 32 g 19 percent of the population Total fat 3.6 g5 percent Saturated fat 1.3 g6 percent Total fat 3.6 g5 percent Carbohydrates in total: 30.4 g (10 percent) 1.1 g4 percent of the daily recommended fiber intake Sugars 3.5 g13 percent 3.5 g13 percent

DIRECTIONS

  • Allow the 1/2 cup warm water, yeast, and 1 teaspoon sugar to proof for 15 minutes
  • Melt the fat and stir in the sugar, salt, vinegar, and warm water until well combined. When the body is warm, add the proofed yeast and mix in 1 1/2 cups flour until well combined. Allow for a 15-minute resting period. Add roughly 3 cups additional flour and knead until smooth. Allow the dough to rise until it has doubled in size (about 2 hours)
  • Deflate the dough and shape it into buns of any size (I make 16 huge buns) or loaves of any shape. Rise until you are double the size of your body (this will take roughly one hour, depending on the size/shape you choose)
  • Preheat the oven to 350°F and bake the buns for approximately 20 minutes. On the “dough” cycle of my machine, I use 2 teaspoons of bread machine yeast and lower the water to around 1 1/2 cups
  • The flour to approximately 4 cups, adding a small amount of additional water or flour as the machine kneads until it produces an evenly sized smooth and soft ball of dough. I’ll keep the rest of the components as they are.

RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

“While this recipe for light, fluffy buns did not originate with my mother, it is so delicious that I am dedicating it to all mothers who prepare bread. ” or, for that matter, anyone who bakes bread in general! I will include the original recipe, but I will admit that I now knead the dough with an ABM, and I will provide directions for this variant at the conclusion of this post. Preparation time refers to the amount of time required for the “dough” cycle in my bread maker. If you want to create 100 percent whole wheat buns (a version of this recipe that is, in my opinion, equally wonderful), I have submitted a recipe under the number recipe168802 with minor modifications.

“I now prefer Mom’s 100 percent Whole Grain Air Buns, recipe186744, even more because they are a healthier version of the original.”

recipes

With the appropriate formula and 10 simple steps, you will learn how to make air buns in no time at all. Even a complete novice can create their very own golden and delicious homemade air buns right away! Air buns are tiny, light, and fluffy in texture, with a delicate flavor. It can be served as a whole or split into little chunks, the majority of which are round in appearance. What makes it so simple to make is the fact that it just calls for a handful of the basic baking ingredients that are required in most recipes.

What You Will Need to Make Homemade Air Buns Recipe

  • Warm milk, 3/4 cup of warm water, 1/2 cup vegetable oil, 1/2 cup white sugar, 3 14 teaspoon active dry yeast, 1 egg, 6 cups all-purpose flour, and 2 14 teaspoon salt are combined to make this recipe.

Equipment

  • Cups and spoons
  • Mixing bowls
  • Pastry brush
  • Spatula
  • Weighing scale (for precise weight per serving)
  • Baking sheet
  • Parchment paper

Find the Most Economical Hand Mixer on the Market.

How to Make Air Buns Step by Step Instructions

Step one is to combine the liquid ingredients with the sugar. Warm the milk, warm the water, the vegetable oil, and the sugar in a small mixing dish, then evenly sprinkle the yeast on top. Stir everything together and let it aside for 5 minutes to allow the flavors to blend. Step two: Combine the flour and salt and stir well. In a separate large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and salt. Make a well in the center of the mixture and then evenly distribute it. After that, beat one egg and add it to the yeast mixture that has bloomed.

  1. Using a spatula, combine the ingredients until they come together to create a dough.
  2. Add extra flour as needed to determine when the dough is ready; the windowpane test should be used to check that the gluten strands are well-developed in the dough.
  3. Brush lightly with olive oil and place the dough in it.
  4. Step Five: Punch the Dough to the Ground Place the dough on a floured surface once it has been punched down.
  5. Form the Air Buns in the Sixth Step Make 16 equal-sized chunks of the dough.
  6. Step Seven: Allow the Dough to Rise and Rise Again Prepare a baking sheet by lining it with parchment paper, placing the dough balls on it, then covering it with plastic wrap and allowing it to rest for 30 minutes.

Step Nine: Remove the Dough from the Refrigerator. Don’t forget to egg wash the dough before baking it. tenth step: Bake your air Buns till they are light and fluffy. Place the rolls in the oven for 15-20 minutes, or until they are lightly browned and have doubled in size.

How To Make Air Buns In 10 Easy Steps

With the appropriate formula and 10 simple steps, you will learn how to make air buns in no time at all. Even a complete novice can create their very own golden and delicious homemade air buns right away! Preparation time: 1hr30mins Cooking Time: 20 minutes Course:Dessert Cuisine:American How To Make Air Buns in 10 Simple Steps is the title of this article. Servings:16

  • Cups and spoons for measuring
  • Mixing bowls and pastry brush
  • Weighing scale (for correct weight per serving)
  • Baking sheet and parchment paper
  • Measuring spoons
  • Mixing bowls
  • Pastry brush
  • Weighing scale (for exact weight per serving)
  • Baking sheet
  • Parchment paper
  • Pour warm milk, warm water, vegetable oil, and sugar into a small mixing basin, and then evenly sprinkle the yeast over the top of the mixture. Mix until smooth. Stir everything together and let it aside for 5 minutes to allow the flavors to blend. In a separate large mixing bowl, add the flour and salt and stir until well combined. Make a well in the center of the mixture and then evenly distribute it. After that, beat one egg and add it to the yeast mixture that has bloomed. Pour the yeast mixture into the dry ingredients and combine thoroughly. Using a spatula, combine the ingredients until they come together to create a dough. Pour out the dough – Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead it for 5-10 minutes, or until it is smooth and elastic. Fill in the gaps with additional flour as needed to determine when the dough is ready
  • Using the windowpane test, you can determine whether or not the gluten strands have fully grown. To prepare the dough, lightly lubricate a large basin with oil and place the dough in it. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let aside for 1 hour, or until the dough has doubled in size. Dough should be punched down and placed on a floured surface after being punched down Knead the dough until it is smooth and elastic
  • Create the air buns by dividing the dough into 16 equal halves. Using your hand, make the letter “C” and allow the dough to spin until it forms a ball
  • Make a baking sheet out of parchment paper and arrange the dough balls on it. Cover it with plastic wrap and let it aside for 30 minutes to allow the dough rest. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit (190 degrees Celsius)
  • Egg wash the dough – Don’t forget to egg wash the dough before baking it. Preheat the oven to 200°F and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until the rolls are lightly browned and have doubled in size.

Pour warm milk, warm water, vegetable oil, and sugar into a small mixing basin, and then evenly sprinkle the yeast on top. Mix until well combined. Stir everything together, then let it aside for 5 minutes to allow the flavors to blend. In a separate large mixing bowl, add the flour and salt and stir until well blended. To make a well, start by mixing everything in evenly. After that, whisk together one egg and add it to the yeast mixture that has bloomed, stirring constantly. Mix in the yeast mixture with the dry ingredients until fully incorporated.

  1. Pour out the dough – Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead it for 5-10 minutes, or until it has become smooth.
  2. When determining whether or not the gluten strands have fully formed, utilize the windowpane test; Remove the dough from the oven and place it in a large basin coated lightly with oil.
  3. Make a hole in the dough with your fingers, and set it on floured surface.
  4. Air buns should be formed by dividing the dough into 16 equal halves.
  5. Cover it with plastic wrap and let it aside for 30 minutes to allow the dough to rise again.
  6. Egg wash the dough – Don’t forget to egg wash the dough before baking it!

Tips and Tricks On How To Make The Best Air Buns

When making your dough, use all-purpose flour to ensure more uniform results. Active dry yeast is recommended for the most regulated rise. Alternative yeasts can be used; just make sure the water is not too hot or cold when you’re making the dough. Make use of a digital kitchen scale to ensure that your buns are the correct size. Do not speed through the last proofreading, no matter how enthusiastic you are! Do you think this article is interesting? Please share this with your Facebook friends.

Air Buns

Mennonite Girls Can Cook is a collection of recipes that were uploaded everyday over a period of ten years, from 2008 to 2018.

Mennonite Girls Can Cook is a project of the Mennonite Women’s Association. We have more than 3,000 delectable dishes that you are invited to test out. Recipes may be found in our recipe file organized by category, or you can search for specific ingredients using the search engine.

Air Buns

Homemade bread and buns are among of my favorite things, and preparing buns is a great stress reliever for me. I generally use half whole wheat flour to my recipes, but this time I didn’t since my children asked me not to. This recipe produces a bun that is extremely light and fluffy. It’s really good.

  • 4 1 1/2 cups warm water
  • 2 tbsp. quick rise yeast
  • 1 cup oil
  • 1 tbsp. vinegar
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup sugar (I use 1/4 cup)
  • 10 cups flour/a bit more if required
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar (I use 1/4 cup)
  1. Begin with approximately 6 cups of flour, then add the yeast, salt, and sugar and whisk well
  2. Combine the warm water, oil, and vinegar in a mixing bowl. Mix everything together with a wooden spoon, adding additional flour until it becomes difficult to mix
  3. To make a soft, smooth, elastic dough, gradually add the remaining flour, kneading after each addition, until the dough is no longer sticky when kneaded Knead the dough by hand for a few minutes on a floured surface. Allow for around 40 minutes of resting time in a greased and covered dish in a warm environment. I cook in my oven with the light turned on. Make buns by pinching out a piece of dough the size of an egg and rolling it into a ball. Form the dough into a ball
  4. Place it on a baking sheet that is 11 × 15 inches and roughly three buns wide and four buns down. They’re about an inch apart from one another. Allow for another 40 minutes of rising time. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees for approximately 20 minutes. Keep an eye on your oven since temperatures might fluctuate. Spread the word and have a good time

Classic Air Bun Recipe that Mom would Make

It took some time to come up with this post. If you are a beginning baker, I would like to offer a step-by-step bun recipe and guide for baking fresh buns with you. At the same time, I don’t want anyone to be discouraged from attempting to steal them. Baking your own fresh buns is not a time-consuming endeavor; the actual hands-on time required is around one hour. However, because the rising process takes some time, you should bake them on a day when you will be at home. I prepared a double batch of bread and buns every week for nearly 20 years, and it was a labor of love.

  • It was the most effective way I could think of to extend my food budget.
  • Buns are a beloved delicacy that may be made for pennies or purchased for a few dollars.
  • My aim is that this bun recipe will become a beloved addition to your recipe collection, just as it has been in mine for the past few years.
  • I’ll provide my recipe for handmade bread as soon as I get it.
  • Because you’ll be working with the bun dough directly on the counter, you’ll want to make sure the surface is as clean as possible.
See also:  How To Toast Hoagie Buns

Softening the Yeast

It took me a while to come up with an idea for this post. A step-by-step bun recipe and instruction for preparing freshly baked buns is what I’d like to share with you today, especially for the beginning baker. At the same time, I don’t want anyone to be discouraged from attempting to steal them from their current location. The real hands-on time required for baking your own fresh buns is around one hour. It is necessary to bake them on a day when you will be at home because the rising process takes time.

  1. Until recently, I had been using this recipe for my air buns.
  2. I understand that carbohydrates are typically avoided these days, but that isn’t the case for adolescent guys or sportsmen, in particular.
  3. Please give this recipe a try if you have never prepared buns before.
  4. This is a recipe for air buns, not a recipe for breads.
  5. 1.

Firstly, make a thorough cleaning of a counter surface. Your bun dough is going to be worked directly on the counter, so make sure the surface is completely clean before you begin.

Mixing the Air Bun Dough

In a large heated mixing basin, combine the lukewarm water, fat, sugar, and salt. Stir until the fat is completely melted. Add the vinegar to the softened yeast and mix thoroughly. Stir. Using two cups at a time, add the flour, stirring well after each addition. Make sure your flour measurement is correct. I use a knife to level the top of my measuring cup to ensure accurate flour measurement. Once you’ve added 8 cups of flour to the dough, you can add one more cup of flour to it. By this point, your dough has become quite thick.

It’s time to get your hands dirty and start working on it.

2: A diagrammatic representation of a diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation of the diagrammatic representation Wring out your hands, sprinkle flour on top of the dough, slip your clean hand under the dough, and fold it over into the centre (see Figure 3).

Turn the bowl 1/4 turn and fold the dough over one more to form a log.

Figure 4: a diagram of the human body

Kneading the Bun Dough

Using 1/2 cup of flour, sprinkle it over a clean counter once the flour has been combined. Keep an additional half cup of flour on hand for dusting the dough with or for sprinkling on the counter if the counter becomes too sticky. Place the dough on a floured surface and begin kneading it in the flour. Pulling your dough over from the underside is a good technique. However, the technique is the same. (My photos were taken with one hand because my other hand was holding the camera. Figure 5After then, simply fold the dough over on itself.

Figure 6 shows a diagram of the human body.

Take a small amount of the flour that has been put aside and sprinkle it on top of the bun dough every now and then.

Signs to Look for When Kneading Bread

Even if it’s difficult to describe, the dough will tell you when it’s been kneaded sufficiently. I am certain that the photographs will do the talking, but here are some elderly woman pointers. During the kneading process, the dough will become less sticky. With time, the gluten will begin to grow, and your dough will become less like a hefty lump and more smooth and elastic. The majority of the flour will mix itself into the dough while it sits on your surface.

It will eventually become impossible to fold the dough over without it sticking to the ball of dough. This is the point at which I stop kneading. The majority of the flour on the counter will be integrated into the dough, and the dough will be smooth when finished baking.

Rising the Bun Dough

However, the dough will tell you when it has been sufficiently kneaded, which is somewhat difficult to explain. Here are some old lady tips, which I am confident the photographs will demonstrate. While kneading, the dough will become less sticky as you go. With time, the gluten will begin to develop, and your dough will become less like a heavy lump and more smooth and elastic in consistency. The majority of the flour will be incorporated into your dough while on the counter. At some point, when you fold the dough over on itself, it will no longer adhere to the dough ball.

The dough will be smooth and elastic because the majority of the flour left on the counter will be incorporated into it.

How to Pan Dinner Rolls

The air buns should be formed and panted after the dough has doubled in size for the second time. There are other methods for forming bun dough, but I will focus on the two most fundamental ones. Crusty rolls are created by forming the buns and placing them on a baking sheet coated with parchment paper, a couple of inches apart so that they do not contact as they rise and bake. That’s exactly how I made ours. To create old-fashioned dinner rolls, you’ll need two 9-by-13-inch pans or three cake pans that have been oiled thoroughly.

  1. As a result, as they rise, the sides will come into contact and you will obtain the soft sides.
  2. My family prefers their buns to be as large as possible.
  3. If you want your buns to be smaller, simply squeeze them off in chunks the size of a big egg and set aside.
  4. To begin, scoop out a little amount of dough, making sure that the smooth side is on top.
  5. Insert the pinched-off dough into the bun and set it on the baking sheet.
  6. Bake for 10-15 minutes at 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  7. Immediately after removing the cakes from the oven, brush the tops with melted butter if you want them to be soft.
  8. Here’s another yeast dough recipe that you’re sure to enjoy.
  9. Cooking Recipe for Homemade ButterhornsPrinting Recipe for Classic Air Buns Freshly baked air buns that are golden on the exterior and light and airy on the inside are a treat.
  1. Make certain that your dish is heated. If it isn’t heated, add hot water and stir it around. Mix in 1/2 cup hot water and 1 teaspoon sugar until well combined. Using the yeast, sprinkle the mixture over top. Allow the yeast to soak for 10 minutes, or until it becomes soft and frothy. In a large heated mixing basin, combine the lukewarm water, fat, sugar, and salt. Stir the ingredients together until the lard is melted. After you’ve added the softened year to the fat mixture, add the vinegar
  2. The flour should be added in two cups at a time, stirring after each addition. You can add one more cup of flour to the mixture when you reach 8 cups, but the dough will be quite thick at this point. Remove the dough from the bowl, sprinkle the flour on top of it, place your clean hand beneath the dough, and fold it over into the center
  3. Continue to fold the dough over and around the outside of the bowl until it is completely covered. Using the remaining cup of flour, sprinkle it over a clean worktop once the flour has been thoroughly combined. Place your dough into the flour and knead it, kneading and twirling the dough around in your hands. During the kneading process, the dough will become less sticky. It will eventually become impossible to fold the dough over because the dough will no longer adhere to the fold. This is the point at which I stop kneading. Your dough should be in the shape of a lovely spherical ball. Remove the dough from the big dough bowl as well as your dough-covered hands. Butter the inside of the bowl to prevent it from sticking. Place the dough in the bowl with the smooth surface on top, so that it is easy to work with. Cover with a clean cloth and set aside in a warm location.

Air Buns

These handmade Air Buns are extremely soft and sensitive, and they almost melt in your mouth when you bite into them. They keep their freshness for several days and freeze incredibly well. This is a no-fail recipe that is ideal for those who are just starting out. Every time I make these delectable air buns, they turn out perfectly. A single batch of this simple recipe yields 45 buns, which are fantastic for lunches and are especially good served alongside soups and stews. Additionally, because these air buns do not include any dairy components, they are ideal for vegans.

  1. These air buns are my all-time favorite and most often used recipe.
  2. These buns, which are also known as yeast rolls, buns, or dinner rolls, are incredibly simple to make and need little work on your part.
  3. First and foremost, allow me to express my enthusiasm for baking my own bread.
  4. Bread prepared from scratch is always fresh, has little sugar and salt, is free of preservatives, and makes your house smell beautiful.
  5. This is a recipe that belonged to my husband’s grandmother.
  6. Amazingly, this recipe has been around for at least 80 years, and it is oh.my.gosh!
  7. I make it once a week, and it is by far the simplest dinner roll recipe I have ever come across.
  8. It yields three huge loaves of bread or 45 rolls, or one loaf of bread and 30 rolls, or two loaves of bread and 15 rolls, depending on how you slice it.

Whatever the case, you get the image. It’s just ridiculously delicious! Furthermore, it never crumbles and remains fresh for several days! Go to the following page:

  • Ingredients
  • Preparation instructions
  • Variations
  • And what to serve with air buns are all covered. Frequently Asked Questions about Recipes
  • Other excellent bread recipes include: Recipe
  • Comments

Ingredients

This Air Bun Recipe requires only a handful of ingredients to be successful. Most likely, you already have everything you need in your kitchen pantry.

  • Flour. Despite the fact that the original recipe called for simply all-purpose flour, I usually include whole wheat flour to make a healthier loaf of bread. I normally use 30 to 50 percent whole wheat flour in the recipe, with the remainder being non-bleached all-purpose flour. This helps to make the dinner rolls fluffy, light, and airy. The greater the proportion of whole wheat flour in the recipe, the heavier and denser the buns become. Yeast. If I’m in a rush, I’ll use quick-rising yeast, but any sort of yeast will do
  • Sugar is a good substitute. Cane sugar is what I use, but you may also use coconut sugar or raw sugar instead. I haven’t tried it with honey yet because my kid is allergic to it, but I’m confident that it would work just as well
  • Oil. The olive oil I use is extra virgin olive oil, but you may use avocado oil, canola oil, or even melted butter or margarine
  • The vinegar I use is apple cider vinegar. The key ingredient in these air buns is a mixture of flour and baking powder. The vinegar helps to keep gluten connections together, preventing them from popping. When used in conjunction with yeast, vinegar acts as a dough conditioner, keeping the yeast happy and helping it to operate more efficiently, resulting in the buns expanding like crazy
  • Salt. As a result, it slows down the rising process, and salt enhances the flavor of the bread, resulting in an exceptionally tasty bun.

Instructions

In a KitchenAid mixer fitted with the dough attachment if available, this air bun recipe may be completed in under an hour, saving you a significant amount of time. Not to worry if you don’t have a stand mixer; you can simply make them by hand if you don’t have one. Simply mix it with a wooden spoon until it is no longer able to be mixed, then use your hands to incorporate the flour. Let’s get this party started! To begin, in a medium-sized mixing basin, combine 12 cup lukewarm water, 1 tablespoon yeast, and 1 teaspoon cane sugar.

  • It will begin to bubble up on the surface.
  • To begin, put 2 cups of HOT water in the bowl of your stand mixer or big mixing bowl.
  • Then combine 12 cups warm water, 12 cup oil, 1 tablespoon vinegar, and 3 cups of flour in a large mixing bowl.
  • Continue to stir in the yeast mixture until well incorporated.
  • Prepare the dough by mixing it together.
  • The dough should have just begun to pull away from the sides of the bowl.
  • Continue to mix for another 5 minutes with the dough hook, or knead by hand on a lightly floured work surface for about 5 minutes longer.
  • I use the ‘proof’ option on my oven, but you may also preheat your oven to 350 degrees for 1 minute, then turn it off and put the dough in there to rise while it cooks on the stove.
  • Divide the dough into three equal halves.
  • Buns may be made by rolling the dough into balls and placing them on cookie sheets lined with parchment paper, or a loaf of bread can be made by dividing the dough into sections and placing them in greased or parchment paper-lined loaf pans.
  • As previously said, I like to throw them in the oven to rise, which eliminates the need to cover them.

375 degrees Fahrenheit, bake for 15 minutes or until golden brown, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Remove from the oven and set on a wire rack to cool for a few minutes before serving.

  • Using your hands, form air buns into balls and set them on a baking sheet. Allow for a 1-hour rise time, or until the dough has doubled in size. After that, bake for 15 minutes in the oven. Allowing the rolls to cool on a wire cooling rack is recommended.
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Fresh out of the oven, serve these handmade air buns with butter or margarine, or with homemade raspberry rhubarb jam for a delicious treat. Yum! Simply avoid burning your mouth by not using too much heat.

Variations

Fresh out of the oven, serve these handmade air buns with butter or margarine, or with homemade raspberry rhubarb jam for a sweet and savory combination. Yum! Simply avoid burning your mouth by not using too much pressure.

  • 1 cup of oats
  • Simply reduce the amount of all-purpose flour used by the same amount. Thirteen cups of flax seeds
  • Thirteen cups of poppy seeds
  • Thirteen cups of chia seeds
  • Thirteen cups of hemp hearts Make homemade cheese buns by dipping the tops of the buns in grated cheese before baking them
  • This is a delicious alternative.

What to serve with air buns

  • Easy Creamy Chicken and Pasta Soup in the Slow Cooker
  • Tender BBQ Pork Ribs in the Instant Pot – From Frozen
  • Keto Tuna Patties cooked in the air fryer – quick and healthy
  • Seriously Easy Spinach and Mushroom Omelet
  • Quick and Easy Fluffy Oven-Baked Omelet Casserole
  • Seriously Easy Spinach and Mushroom Omelet
  • Seriously Easy Spinach and Mushroom Omelet It’s very simple to make homemade Raspberry Rhubarb Freezer Jam.

Recipe FAQs

Do these air buns keep well in the freezer? It is true that these handmade air buns freeze very well! When they thaw, they taste exactly like they did when they were freshly baked; that is, if you have any leftovers to store; otherwise, my family devours them as soon as they come out of the oven! Allow them to cool for at least an hour or two on a cooling rack before placing them in a big ziplock freezer bag to keep them fresh. Place them in the freezer after zipping them up as tightly as you can, sucking out as much air as you can.

To thaw frozen yeast rolls, remove them from the freezer and set them on your kitchen counter to defrost for several hours.

Is it possible to over-knead dough?

Because of this, it is critical not to knead the dough for more than 5 minutes at a time.

Other great bread recipes:

You may rate the recipe and leave a comment letting me know how you liked it if you’ve tried this Air Bun Dish or any other recipe on my site. Thank you for your time. I always look forward to hearing from you! You may also find me on other media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest. Would you mind include my Instagram handle, @windingcreek ranch, in your photos? I’d love to see some of your photographs! Please also subscribe to my weekly email to receive my most recent recipes!

Recipe

  • These handmade Air Buns are very soft, sensitive, and almost melt in your mouth when you bite into them. They keep their freshness for several days and freeze incredibly well. It’s impossible to mess up this dinner roll recipe for novices
  • They’re quick and simple to make and turn out perfectly each and every time. This fast roll recipe yields 45 buns, which are ideal for lunches or to serve alongside soups and stews as an accompaniment. Furthermore, because these dinner rolls do not include any dairy components, they are ideal for vegans
  • And Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking Time: 15 minutes 2 hours before sunrise 2 hours and 30 minutes in total CourseBreakfast CuisineAmericanServings45rollsCalories94kcal

Yeast mixture

  • 12 cup lukewarm water
  • 1 teaspoon yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar (cane).

How to make the dough

  • 2cupsHOT water
  • 2teaspoonsalt
  • 12cupcane sugar
  • 112cupsWARM water
  • 12cupoil
  • 1tablespoonwhite vinegar
  • 2cupsHOT water
  • 2teaspoons salt
  • 12cupcane sugar 9-10cupsflour It’s 3 cups of whole wheat flour and the rest is all-purpose unbleached flour that I use

Yeast mixture

  • In a medium-sized mixing basin, combine 12 cup lukewarm water, 1 tablespoon yeast, and 1 teaspoon cane sugar. Allow for a 5-minute resting period. It will begin to bubble up on the surface

Begin to make the dough

  • Add 2 cups of HOT water to a large mixing basin or the bowl of your KitchenAid stand mixer. Add 2 teaspoons salt and 12 cup cane sugar to the boiling water and whisk until the sugar is completely dissolved. Next, combine 112 cups WARM water, 12 cup oil, 1 tablespoon vinegar, and 3 cups of flour in a large mixing bowl. Mix
  • Continue to stir the yeast mixture into the batter in the basin. Continue to add flour in little amounts, a cup at a time, until the dough is smooth and begins to pull away from the sides of the mixing bowl (about 15 minutes). Ideally, it should be a smooth and spherical ball. Continue punching down for another 8 to 10 minutes, or 5 minutes if using a KitchenAid mixer fitted with the dough hook, as needed. Allow the dough to rise for 1 hour in a warm location, or until it has doubled in size
  • Dividing the dough into three equal parts is a good idea. Each piece yields 15 air buns or 1 loaf of bread depending on your preference. Roll out the dough into 1.5-inch balls and use them to make the air buns. Spread out on cookie sheets that have been lined with parchment paper. Using a greased or parchment paper-lined bread pan, lay a portion of the dough in the pan
  • Cover and let rise in a warm location for 1 hour, or until the dough has doubled in size. I know it’s difficult to be patient, but it will be well worth it

When air buns or bread are the sizes you would like them:

  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Preheat the oven to 350°F and bake for 15 minutes, or until golden brown
  • Remove the pan from the oven and set it on a wire rack to cool Enjoy

The nutritional information provided is approximate and should only be used as a guideline. Serving:10grams Calories:94kcal Carbohydrates:19g Protein:3g Fat:1g Sodium:11mg Fiber:1g Baking, bread, buns, dinner rolls, french bread rolls, yeast rolls are some of the terms used in this article.

  • The nutritional information is provided as a guideline only and should not be considered exact or definitive. Serving:10grams Calories:94kcal Carbohydrates:19g Protein:3g Fat:1g Sodium:11mg Fiber:1g KEYWORDS: BAKED BAKED BAKED BAKED BAKED BAKED BAKED BAKED BAKED BAKED BAKED

Air Buns

My hubby seldom asks for a meal or a specific food item. He’s a wonderful individual to provide food for. He’ll eat everything I cook for him, even if it’s something he doesn’t particularly enjoy. On the other hand yesterday night, he glanced at me and remarked, “Making cinnamon buns could be a good idea. I’d want to get my hands on some.” So what else was there for me to do today than bake cinnamon buns? “Air Buns” is the recipe that I used, and it can be found all over the internet in about the same proportions as this recipe.

  • Whoever brought me to this recipe will remain in my debt for the rest of my life since it is one of the greatest and most straightforward roll recipes available.
  • However, I prepared it today in a manner that was practically identical to the instructions.
  • Whenever possible, I use instant quick rise yeast for active dry yeast and combine the entire recipe, avoiding the yeast’s proving step.
  • The dough formed a ball in my stand mixer after approximately 10 minutes of mixing, and the sides of the bowl were clean once the mixing was completed.
  • As a result, there was never a shortage of bread dough to fry up for a substantial lunch while Don’s mother’s family of seven children was young and at home.
  • The first time I saw them was at Aunt Bell’s place, which was a long time ago.

She was taken aback and seated me down before handing me a couple molasses-laced sips. Thank you very much, Aunt Bell. The recipe is included at the end of this page. Air Buns are a type of bun that is made of air.

  • 2 teaspoons vinegar or lemon juice
  • 3 12 cups lukewarm water
  • 12 cup melted shortening, butter, or oil

Here’s how to create it: Combine the yeast, 12 cup warm water, and 1 teaspoon sugar in a mixing bowl. Allow for a 10-minute rise. Shortening (butter or oil), lemon juice (or vinegar), warm water, and the risen yeast mixture are mixed together in a small bowl until well combined. In a large mixing basin, whisk together the remaining 12 cup sugar, the salt, and approximately 8 cups of the flour. Make a well in the flour and pour in the liquid ingredients until the well is filled. In a large mixing bowl, combine the ingredients, adding extra flour as required to form a soft but not sticky dough.

  1. Place in a greased mixing bowl and allow to rise for 2 hours.
  2. Allow for an additional 1 hour of rising time.
  3. Place on a prepared baking sheet or in oiled muffin tins at a distance of approximately 3 inches.
  4. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit a few minutes before the buns are to be baked.
  5. This recipe yields around 4-5 dozen dinner rolls.
  6. The dough has been prepared and is ready to rise.
  7. Then it’s time to use this dough to create a slew of delectable goodies.

Perfectly fried to perfection!

It is now time to prepare the Cinnamon Rolls.

Cinnamon should be sprinkled on top.

Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper for easy cleanup.

The cake is still warm from the oven, awaiting the frosting.

As you can see, I just cooked one pan of cinnamon buns with raisins, which you can find here.

Before they rise and bake, they appear to be rather little.

Rolls that have just come out of the oven have been brushed with melted butter.

It’s so light and airy.

These keep quite nicely in the freezer.

They’ll taste just as nice as they did the day you made them. Plain Air Buns with butter are delectable; fried in molasses like Newfoundland Toutons are delectable; and cinnamon rolls are delectable. To print, click on the arrow in the top right corner.

MOM’S AIR BUNS recipe – from the Something Old & Something New Family Cookbook

5 stars – based on a single vote Have you tried it? This recipe has been rated:

Contributor:
�cup warm water1 tsp sugar1 envelope or 2 tbsp of yeast3 � cups lukewarm water1 cup white sugar1 tsp salt1 tbsp vinegar � cup shortening melted and cooled9-10 cups flour

Directions:
Mix 1/2 cup warm water, 1 tsp sugar and yeast together and let rise for 10 minutes in warm place. Mix next 6 ingredientswith risen yeast so that dough does not stick to hands.Grease bowl and put dough in bowl and cover with towel.Let rise in warm place for 2 hours then knead it.Let rise for 1 more hour.Form into balls and place on greased cookie sheet.Cover with towel and let rise 3 hours.Bake until light golden brown approx. 15 to 20 minutes at 375 degrees.

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Helen McKinney’s Canadian Prairie Dinner Buns

It is not a source of shame for me to have my mother, who is approaching 86 years old, bake buns for every festive event throughout the year. Indeed, the holiday would be incomplete without her buns, and despite the fact that she “showed me how to make them” many years ago, she was not a particularly patient instructor. She is now in a position to do so. And, since I now know more, I am better positioned to genuinely learn from her. She was simply too far ahead of me at the time, back in the day.

  • ” Awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww They are no longer necessary for me to manufacture!” What is my response?
  • “Of course you do!” I say.
  • Along with teaching me, I also made them at the same time using my Thermomix machine, and we all participated in a blind tasting at the conclusion of it all!
  • Each of the yeast-scented soft pillowy mounds blended together, making it impossible to distinguish between hers and mine.
  • What a resounding success.
  • You have earned the title of “Kitchen Idol.” The recipe, which she has written in her own writing, is exactly as it was 60 years ago.
  • Everyone pitched in to make bread.

Aunty Pat was the source of this dish.

‘Pat Thompson,’ says the narrator.

I’ll never forget her warmth, her kindness, or the food she served me at her table.

That is, until Mom obtained a copy of “her recipe.” Consider the implications of this.

Even if the exact amounts of each component were provided, the true magic occurs in the hands of the creator.

Consider the following: French bread, Italian bread, German bread – all of which are drastically different, yet all of which are made with the same four simple components.

In the world of bread making, there are “Masters of Bread Making” and “Messers of Bread Making.” It is what you do with those four simple elements that makes all of the difference in the world.

Most likely because she was born on a farm where she and her mother fed threshers on a yearly basis, to a mother who had 13 siblings of her own.

It’s just the way things were.

This is still the case.

When she has a day off, she bakes or cooks to pass the time.

She is the one who produces them.

There is nothing that can be done to stop her. Yes, we are well aware that we are a very, very fortunate group of people!

Helen McKinney’s Prairie Dinner Buns

Sugar and water are combined with a helpful finger to prepare the yeast for proofing, and then the yeast is added. Everything tastes better when served with butter, and Mom’s buns are no exception to this rule. Divide 1/4 cup of the pound into four equal halves and arrange the unique “Canadian Prairie Dinner Bun” ingredients. Ingredients: butter, sugar, egg, and milk (not in the photo). This is also the step at which the salt is introduced together with the sugar. While the yeast is proving, combine the butter, sugar, salt, and egg in a mixing bowl using an electric mixer until well blended.

  1. Her first GE Sunbeam was a dependable appliance in our home kitchen for more than three decades.
  2. She has used only two in the previous ten years and will not use anything else.
  3. It’s a sweet little giggle.
  4. Before adding the yeast, a cup or two of flour should be incorporated into the wet ingredients.
  5. There is no dough at this time.
  6. When she is in the vicinity, you must always look before you walk.
  7. She is unable to see or hear anything at all.

“Oh, Valerie!

“Please, don’t take any more photographs!” The batter in the upper left is turning into a dough.

It is now necessary to remove the mixture from this bowl and transfer it to another for hand mixing.

Mom whisked all of the delicious vitality out of the yeast as it grew and then put it into the bowl of batter.

Not only is she folding, rather than beating, but she is also not slow and delicate in her motions.

It is ingrained in her muscle memory to do this bread-making procedure, and she just “takes it away.” She has formed a ball of sticky dough by folding in the amount of flour indicated in the recipe, which is little less than 1/2 cup.

At this point, I’ll mention that my dough is complete and is currently resting in my Thermomix dish.

I did not follow the same procedure as the others, but I will explain why later on.

It all starts with a simple folding motion of the dough to evenly distribute the flour over the work area.

She kneads practically from the beginning of the video above.

You can see she isn’t being rigorous or working up a sweat, but she is steady and reliable.

You’ll want to pay close attention for the pops and crackles in the dough since we normally talk over them, but you can hear them. Because Mom’s Canadian Prairie Dinner Buns are almost through with their proofing, I’ll tell you about what I did in the Thermomix at the same time.

Translating Helen McKinney’s Canadian Prairie Dinner Bun Recipe to the Thermomix TM5

Sugar and water are combined with a handy finger to prepare the yeast for proofing. The yeast is then added. Everything tastes better when served with butter, and Mom’s buns are no different. Divide the pound into quarters and separate the special “Canadian Prairie Dinner Bun” additions from the rest. Butter, sugar, egg, and milk are all used in this recipe (not in the photo). At this point, the salt is also added along with the sugar. Meanwhile, while the yeast is proofing, cream together the butter with the sugar, salt, and egg in an electric mixer until light and fluffy.

  1. We had our first GE Sunbeam in our home kitchen for more than 30 years, and it was a reliable appliance.
  2. The last ten years, she’s had two, and she’s not going to use any other.
  3. The smallest of giggles.
  4. Before adding the yeast, a cup or two of flour should be mixed into the wet ingredients.
  5. There is still no dough.
  6. When she is present, you must always look before you walk.
  7. She is completely unable to see or hear anything.

Valerie screamed out, “Oh, Valerie!” Already!

It is beginning to form a dough in the upper left corner of the screen.

It is now necessary to remove the mixture from this bowl and transfer it to another for further hand mixing.

Mom whisked all of the lovely life out of the yeast as it grew and then poured it into the bowl of ingredients.

But she does not fold in a slow and gentle manner, nor does she beat her breasts.

It is ingrained in her muscle memory that she “takes it away” from the process of making bread.

In order to begin hand kneading, she covers her work surface area with 1/4 cup of the leftover flour she has leftover.

In this case, there isn’t any snarl.

It is placed on a well-floured work surface and appears to be highly saturated.

The dough was sticking to her hands, but as she worked, the sticky bits became part of the dough.

She kneaded for about ten minutes in the kitchen.

Following that, she allowed the dough to rest for approximately 5-7 minutes before continuing with the second video.

Due to the fact that we usually talk over these sounds, but you can hear them, pay close attention to the pops and crackles in the dough. Because Mom’s Canadian Prairie Dinner Buns are almost finished with their proofing, I’ll tell you about what I did in the Thermomix at the same time as her buns.

Forming Canadian Prairie Dinner Buns

My dough, shown on the right in the photo above, proofed for a far longer period of time than mom’s, as evidenced by the bubbles that have formed on the surface. Both doughs, on the other hand, are really stunning. “You’re so alive!” would exclaim Richard Bertinet. Please don’t misunderstand what I’m saying. Making dough by hand is something I enjoy doing. When it comes to being a prairie girl, there is nothing more satisfying, and I am genuinely “old school.” Before being handed a calculator, I think that every pupil should be able to perform complex mathematical calculations by hand.

  1. So, if the people who put food on the table for our Canadian families aren’t going to learn to make bread by hand, they can surely make it from scratch using a Thermomix machine, which is becoming increasingly popular.
  2. Because I have two children who have one, I decided to translate this dish.
  3. My dough is on the left, and my mother’s is on the right.
  4. Mine was on the verge of doing so!
  5. She then began pushing her palms firmly against the dough in order to form a rectangle from which to cut the buns.
  6. Since everyone in our family enjoys a substantial dinner bun, she chose a glass with a generous circle.
  7. My buns, on the other hand, were significantly rounder and bigger than hers.

With each cutting motion, I pressed one side of the glass into the dough and then pulled that side inward to trap a greater quantity of dough within each cut.

She would push the dough between cutting circles on a frequent basis, I would estimate, to keep the height of the dough consistent at almost an inch.

It’s possible that cutting circles in dough to make buns would be deemed sacrilege by a professional French Bread Baker.

Nonetheless, it is via this process that the texture and shape that we have come to associate with the Canadian Prairies are created.

Bags of buns from the grocery store have taken the place of this great Canadian prairie dinner bun, which used to be a fixture at every family holiday meal, church supper, and family reunion picnic in the past.

For my mother and myself, this day of bread-making was really rewarding. My dough is shown below. Evidence that I followed the instructions my mother gave me. Our buns will need to proof for around 30-40 minutes more before they can be baked.

Proofing and Baking Canadian Prairie Dinner Buns

I proofed my dough for a far longer period of time than my mother’s, as seen by the bubbling on the surface of my dough (see photo above on the right). Both doughs, on the other hand, are simply stunning. Richard Bertinet would exclaim, “You’re so alive!” To be clear, I’m not implying that you should ignore the facts. Baking bread by hand is something I really like doing. 🙂 When it comes to being a prairie girl, there is nothing more satisfying, and I am definitely “old school.” Before being handed a calculator, I think that every pupil should be able to do complex mathematical operations by hand.

So, if the people who put food on the table for our Canadian families aren’t going to learn how to bake bread by hand, they can surely make it from scratch using a Thermomix machine, which is becoming more and more popular.

My girls each have one, which is why I decided to translate this dish into Spanish.

In the photo above is my dough, while in the photo below is my mother’s dough Everything about her poured out just how she desired.

She folded her dough in thirds on top of itself, one third over into the centre, and the other third on top of the two layers on top of the first two.

For the sake of consistency and to ensure that I got the same outcome as she did with her dough, I did exactly what she did with mine.

When I made my buns, I used the exact same glass.

My mother had taught me to do this many years ago and she just pressed the glass into the dough.

When I showed her, she said she didn’t recall doing anything at all.

Thick.

Each every bun is shaped by a process, and none are just cut out in this way as seen above.

Unfortunately, only a small percentage of the population in the previous two generations has ever had the pleasure of eating this delicious supper bun.

There is also a difference in the job in the kitchen now.

Making bread with my mother was a very rewarding experience. My dough is seen below. The proof that I followed the instructions that my mother demonstrated for me In order to bake our buns, we will need to proof them for around 30-40 minutes more.

Canadian Prairie DInner Buns

This recipe has been in my mother’s possession since 1950, when it was handed to her by her longtime friend Pat. Aunty Pat was well-known across the community for her superb cooking and for baking the greatest buns in town. This is the traditional Canadian prairie supper bun recipe, which may be produced at home. My mother’s famous recipe for Helen McKinney’s Canadian Prairie Dinner Buns is still in use today, just as it was when I was a youngster, and is served at picnics, potlucks, Sunday and church dinners.

  • 1 heaping tablespoon granulated yeast (not quick)
  • 1 heaping tablespoon sugar a 1/2 cup lukewarm water, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1/4 cup butter, room temperature, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 cup sugar, 1 egg, 2 cups tepid milk, 2 cups flour, 3 1/2 cups flour, 1/2 cup flour
  • A 1/2 cup tepid water, 1 teaspoon sugar

Ingredients for the Thermomix

  • 1 heaping tablespoon granulated yeast (not quick)
  • 1 heaping teaspoon sugar a 1/2 cup lukewarm water, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1/4 cup butter, room temperature, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 cup sugar, 1 egg, 2 cups tepid milk, 2 cups flour, 3 1/2 cups flour, 1/2 cup flour, a 1/2 cup flour, a 1/2 cup flour

Instructions for Making the Dough

  1. 1 heaping tablespoon granulated yeast (not quick)
  2. 1 teaspoon sugar a 1/2 cup tepid water, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1/4 cup butter at room temperature, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/4 cup sugar, 1 egg, 2 cups tepid milk, 2 cups flour, 3 1/2 cups flour, 1/2 cup flour
  3. A 1/2 cup flour

Instructions for Making the Buns

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Prepare the work area by lightly flouring it
  2. Flip the rising dough upside down onto the work surface
  3. Fold the paper three times over on itself. the dough should be patted into a rectangle about 12 x 15 inches
  4. Flour a big biscuit cutter and cut the buns out of the dough
  5. Place the buns on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and allow them to rise until they have doubled in size (about 30 minutes). Bake for 15 minutes, or until golden brown
  6. Remove from oven and brush the tops of each with melted butter
  7. Cool. Cool

Instructions for the Thermomix

  1. Leaving out the yeast, place the following seven ingredients in the Thermomix bowl (water, sugar, butter, salt, sugar again, egg, and milk)
  2. Mix on high speed for 30 seconds. at 40 degrees Celsius, speed 2 (this ensures that all ingredients are at a good proofing temperature)
  3. Mix for 8 minutes at 40 degrees Celsius, speed 2 (this ensures that all ingredients are at a good proofing temperature)
  4. Yeast should be weighed in. temperature 40 degrees Celsius, speed 2
  5. Proof for 3 minutes Rest for 10 minutes (this isn’t strictly essential, but it’s great to pay tribute to those who came before you and to watch the batter develop)
  6. 250 grams of flour are weighed into the TM bowl, and they are combined for 2 minutes at 40 degrees Celsius, speed 2. In a TM bowl, weigh the remaining 500 grams of flour
  7. Mix on speed 0-4 for 10 seconds, or until the dough forms a ball. Knead for a total of 4 minutes. The dough will be elastic and soft, similar to a baby’s bottom. Grease a large mixing basin
  8. Lay the dough in the bowl face down, knead it a little, and then flip it over to prove
  9. Cover with a warm moist towel and set aside in a warm area until it has doubled in volume
  10. Make the buns according to the directions listed above.

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