How To Make Bao Buns Without A Steamer

How to Steam Bao Buns Without a Steamer (Microwave, Oven, or Pan) – KitchenPerfect

Bao buns have grown in popularity in recent years. The majority of those who prepare them utilize a bamboo steamer. Many people, on the other hand, question if it is feasible to create bao buns without using a steamer. This shouldn’t come as a surprise given the fact that a bamboo steamer isn’t all that common. It is possible to prepare bao buns without the use of a steamer, which is a blessing. If you want to make bao bun kits, you may utilize a variety of methods to create the same result while still enjoying them.

No matter why you’re attempting to make bao buns without a steamer, the good news is that it is quite possible to do.

Although this item generates some condensation, the basket is responsible for collecting the vast bulk of it.

It goes without saying that you will want to achieve the same results with the improvised methods we will discuss next.

How do You Steam Steamed Buns Without a Steamer?

There are several methods for steaming bao buns that do not require the use of a steamer. All of these processes rely on water and heat to steam the buns, and the differences between them are minor. If you don’t have a bamboo steamer, you can use a microwave steamer, an oven steamer, a metal steamer, or an electric steamer to steam bao buns instead.

How to Steam Buns in a Microwave

Using a microwave to steam bao buns is a viable option. When you purchase your microwave, it does not come with a container for steaming vegetables. Instead, you’ll have to go out and get one on the side. There are a variety of microwave steamers on the market. Fundamentally speaking, a microwave steamer is a special plastic container that is composed of a bowl with a steamer basket inside and a lid on the top. To steam your bao buns in the microwave, simply fill the plastic container halfway with water (about two or three glasses).

  • Once the setup is complete, insert the microwave steamer into the microwave and turn the microwave on to heat.
  • You will require a paper towel for this task.
  • After that, wrap a few bao buns in a paper towel and place them in the microwave for a couple of minutes.
  • For each additional bun, you can add 10 seconds to your time.

Do You Put Water in a Microwave Steamer?

The short answer is that yes, it is possible.

Even in a microwave, it would be difficult to steam anything if there was no water present. Two to three glasses of water will suffice to steam the bao buns while they are still warm.

How to Steam Bao Buns in the Oven

Using an oven-safe hotel pan, a perf pan insert, parchment paper, and another hotel pan to serve as a cover will allow you make steam bao buns in the oven. Following the preparation of your dough and the letting it ride:

  1. Cut the paper into small squares that correspond to the size of your buns. A small amount of water should be added to the bottom pan. Place the perforated pan insert on top of the water in a large mixing bowl. Place each bun on a square of parchment paper and place it on the perf pan insert
  2. Repeat with the remaining buns.

If you use this setup, you can even steam approximately 25-30 bao buns at a time. A perf pan can be substituted with an oven-safe plate laid on aluminum foil balls if you do not have one on hand. All you have to do is set the dough on top of the plate and you’ll have a fully functional oven steamer in no time. As soon as the setup is complete, shut the oven and bring the heat up to the highest setting for 10 to twelve minutes.

How to Steam Buns in a Pan

It is also feasible to steam bao buns in a pan, using a procedure that is similar to that of using a metal steamer. However, there are a few issues that might develop while using a pan. Pans can hold condensation, which will drip down onto the bao if they are not properly vented. Here’s what you can do to avoid this situation:

  • Greaseproof paper should be used to line a metal baking pan. Don’t overfill the container with water. Avoid allowing the bao buns to come into contact with the sides of the pan, as this can cause them to become too wet. Cover the top of the container with a clean tea towel

Bao Buns in Electric Steamer

With the help of an electric steamer, you can make bao buns in no time. The procedure, on the other hand, differs slightly from that of using a bamboo steamer. Similar to using a bamboo steamer, the first step is to prepare the dough and allow it to rise before cooking. After that has been completed, turn on the steamer to bring the water to a boil, as directed. In order to make the bao buns, you will need to cut parchment paper to the exact size of the bao buns. Spray the paper squares with nonstick spray before putting the buns into the squares of paper.

It is recommended that the buns be steamed for approximately eight to twelve minutes.

Can you Steam Bao Buns in a Metal Steamer?

If you don’t have a bamboo steamer, you’ll be delighted to hear that you can still make bao buns in a metal steamer, which is far less expensive. You may even create your own improvised metal steamer out of scrap metal. This method is relatively simple, and you should have no difficulty following it at all. Aluminum foil and a deep skillet are all that are required. To begin, heat a big, deep skillet over a medium-high flame. Bring a small amount of water to a boil. While the water is heating, begin tearing off pieces of aluminum foil from a few rolls of aluminum foil.

In this case, the metal will just be utilized as a non-flammable support for your makeshift steamer, and it will not be heated.

During the time when the water beneath the plate is boiling, the rising steam will bake your bao buns in your absence.

To steam your buns in the electric steamer, cut parchment paper into squares and arrange them on top of the parchment paper squares.

Wrap the lid of the steamer with a towel and seal it with a rubber band before closing it. During the steaming process, this will prevent moisture from leaking onto your buns.

Why do my Steamed Buns Collapse?

The collapse of your steamed buns might be caused by a variety of factors. The first and most likely reason for this is that you opened the lid right after steaming finished. As an alternative, leave the lid on for about two to three minutes before opening it. If you open the lead immediately after steaming, the temperature change will be rapid, and your buns may collapse as a result of the rapid temperature change. Condensation is another factor that could be contributing to the collapse of your steamed buns.

This will assist you in capturing condensation and preventing it from dripping down and destroying the surface of your buns.

Is it Safe to Steam With Aluminum Foil?

Aluminum foil is not considered a hazardous substance by the EPA. In fact, it is employed in a wide variety of culinary applications. Using aluminum foil to steam your bao buns, on the other hand, may cause a minor increase in the amount of metal you consume. Fortunately, many people consume significantly less aluminum than is generally considered safe for consumption. Aluminum foil should not be regarded a health hazard while steaming your bao buns, for this reason. The issue arises only if you use excessive amounts of aluminum foil in other cooking applications as well.

Are steamed Buns Healthy?

Bao buns can be prepared in a variety of ways and with a variety of different ingredients. As a result, how healthy they are is largely determined by you and the ingredients you use to prepare them. There are also less typical dessert choices, such as the chocolate bao bun, that are worth considering. Additionally, you may develop your own vegetarian bao recipe. It is entirely up to you to decide. When it comes to calorie count, we can’t declare that steamed buns are the “healthiest” of all the munchies.

  1. However, if they are consumed in moderation, they should not pose a threat to health or safety.
  2. Bao buns are a Chinese delicacy.
  3. In any case, the objective is to consume them as part of a well-balanced diet.
  4. Although a bamboo steamer is not required for steaming bao buns, it is the traditional method of doing so.
  5. Wishing you the best of luck and happy cooking!
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How to Make and Steam Bao Buns without a Bamboo Steamer

Interested in learning how to make and steam bao buns without the use of a bamboo steamer? Do you want to learn how to make the most delectable and simple bao buns ever? I didn’t use a bamboo steamer for them; instead, I used a standard steamer. They turned out to be light, fluffy, and supple. They were INCREDIBLY good. Using a stand mixer will make your life a lot simpler if you already have one.

Making these bao buns with mysesame garlic tofu was a labor of love, but boy, was it worthwhile. For more information on how I prepared this dish without using a bamboo steamer (or to watch the video), see the recipe below (or watch the video). You will require the following materials:

  • Interested in learning how to prepare and steam bao buns without the use of a bamboo steamer? You want to know how to create the most delectable and simple bao buns you’ve ever tasted? I didn’t use a bamboo steamer for these
  • Instead, I used a conventional steamer to cook them. They turned out fluffy and airy in texture. This group of people were AMAZING! Having a stand mixer will make your life a lot easier, so invest in one. Making these bao buns with mysesame garlic tofu was a labor of love, but oh, was it rewarding. To find out how I made this without a bamboo steamer (or to watch the movie), check the recipe below (or watch the video). It is necessary to have the following materials:

Continue reading to see out how I steamed these puppies!

How to Make and Steam Bao Buns without a Bamboo Steamer

Theyeast should be activated. In a small mixing dish, combine the warm water and warm milk. Check to see that it is not hot to the touch, but rather warm to the touch. Combine the yeast, oil, and sugar in a mixing bowl. Allow for 4 minutes of resting time after stirring. Make the dough from scratch. Combine the flour, baking powder, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer. Using a dough hook, incorporate all of the ingredients until well blended. Slowly incorporate the wet ingredients into the dough and knead for 3-5 minutes on a medium-high speed.

  1. Wait 2 hours or until the dough has doubled in size in a bowl covered with cling wrap before continuing with the recipe below.
  2. As opposed to pasta, you will not need to add any more flour to this dish.
  3. Cut through the dough with a glass, cup, or round cookie cutter to produce precise circles, and then repeat the process with the remaining dough pieces.
  4. Make the buns into a bun shape.
  5. Keep pressing down with your hand to ensure that it remains folded.
  6. Allow them to rest for a further 30 minutes.
  7. Meanwhile, bring a wok or a steamer filled with water to a rolling boil.
  8. If you don’t, here’s what will happen: Prepare parchment paper by cutting it into squares the same size as your buns.
  9. Wrap a tea towel around the lid and tie the towel around the handle with a rubber band to keep it in place.
  10. Repeat the process with the remaining buns.

Notes on How to Make and Steam Bao Buns without a Bamboo Steamer

  • Instant yeast should be used in this recipe
  • However, the rise time will only be approximately 30 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size
  • I highly recommend checking for active yeast before beginning to work on this recipe. 14 cup of warm water should have 1 teaspoon of sugar and 2 14 teaspoons of yeast (one packet) added to it. Keep an eye on the mixture for 10 minutes, and if you see foams and bubbles, as well as the characteristic yeast aroma, your yeast is still good to go. If this is the case, you will need to obtain fresh yeast.

Description

Instant yeast should be used in this recipe; however, the rise period will only be around 30 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size; I highly recommend testing for activity before beginning to work on this recipe. Prepare the dough by combining 14 cup of warm water, 1 teaspoon of sugar, and 2 14 teaspoons of yeast (from one package). Keep an eye on the mixture for 10 minutes, and if you notice foams and bubbles, as well as the characteristic yeast odour, your yeast is still active. You’ll need to purchase some new yeast if this isn’t the case.

  • 13 cup warm water, 12 cup warm milk, 1 tablespoon active dry yeast, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, 2 12 cups all-purpose flour, 12 teaspoon baking powder, 14 teaspoon salt
  1. 13 cup warm water, 12 cup warm milk, 1 tablespoon active dry yeast, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, 2 12 cups all-purpose flour, 12 teaspoon baking powder, 14 teaspoon salt

Notes

  • 13 cup warm water
  • 12 cup warm milk
  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 12 cups all-purpose flour
  • 12 teaspoon baking powder
  • 14 teaspoon salt
  • 13 cup warm water
  • 12 cup warm milk
  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 12 cups all-purpose flour
  • 12 teaspoon baking powder
  • 14 teaspoon salt

Nutrition

  • 96.9 calories per serving, 2.5 grams of sugar, 90.0 milligrams of sodium, 2.5 grams of fat, 1.75 grams of saturated fat, 16 grams of carbohydrates, 0.6 grams of fiber, 1.9 grams of protein
  • Cholesterol: 0.0 milligrams

Reader Interactions

Image courtesy of Vincent M on Unsplash. Do you eat steamed buns on a regular basis? They’re light and fluffy, and they make an excellent snack.

Making them at home is always a good idea, but most Western houses do not have access to the traditional bamboo steamer that is used to prepare them. That’s not an issue because there are alternative approaches that are just as effective! Here are a couple of examples to get you started.

Tabletop Steamer

In the event that you have a tabletop electric rice steamer, School of Wok recommended that you use it for steaming buns. Alternatively, a deep pot with a plate within that is lifted above the water in the bottom can be used. Before you put the cover on the pot, be sure to drape a clean cloth over the top of the pot. This will soak up any water that condenses on the surface of the buns, preventing them from becoming moist.

See also:  How To Heat Up Pork Buns

Sheet Pan

Well Done Cooking demonstrates how to steam your buns in the oven using a sheet pan and a baking sheet. If you’re using a sheet pan, be sure it’s deep enough to contain the water. Place a raised wire rack on top of the sheet pan, pour some water into the pan, and arrange the buns on top of the wire rack. After that, wrap the entire thing in tinfoil and bake for 10 minutes on the bottom shelf of the oven.

Deep Skillet

We learn how to steam your buns in the oven with a sheet pan from Well Done Cooking in this video. If you’re using a sheet pan, be sure it has enough depth to accommodate the water. On top of the sheet pan, set up a high wire rack and fill it with water. Then stack the buns on top of it all! Then, wrap the entire thing in tinfoil and bake it for 10 minutes on the lowest shelf of your oven.

Question: How To Cook Chinese Dumplings Without A Steamer?

What is the most effective method of steaming a dumpling?

  • When everything is hot and steaming, treat your plate with oil or nonstick spray before adding your dumplings and covering with a lid. Having said that, a large number of dumplings are not cooked in the baskets at all, which is a problem. Many dumplings are pan-fried first, then steamed by simply covering the pan with a lid and adding a little water to the pan to cook them

Fill the pot with a few inches of water, bring it to a boil, and then reduce the heat to a medium simmer. Place a small amount of sesame oil on the dish and then as many dumplings as will fit on top of it (without crowding). Remove plate from pot and gently place it on top of the foil balls, then cover pot with a lid. Allow for 7-8 minutes of steaming time or until the chicken is cooked through. 28-Sep-2016 Is it possible to cook dumplings without using a bamboo steamer?

  • The solution is shockingly straightforward. I don’t have aBambooSteamer, so how can I steam dumplings? First and foremost, if you merely want to cook the dumplings, a metal steamer basket will suffice. Be warned, however, that the dumplings will want to stick to the steamer basket, so spray the steamer basket thoroughly with nonstick cooking spray

What can I use if I don’t have a steamer basket?

Fill a medium-sized saucepan halfway with water, then set three golf ball-sized balls of aluminum foil on the bottom, rest a heat-proof plate on top of the foil balls, and bring the water to a boil. Place the vegetables on a plate, cover with a plate, and steam until crisp-tender.

How do you steam dumplings in the microwave?

Make soup dumplings in the microwave in three easy stages by following this recipe:

  1. Put the dumplings in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave for 30 seconds. Fill the basin halfway with hot water. The amount of water in the dish should be sufficient to cover all of the dumplings. Cook the dumplings on high heat for 4-6 minutes in the microwave after putting them in the pan.

Can you make Bao buns without a steamer?

There will be no filling until it reaches the table, no pleating of the dough, and no real mess. Alternatively, a wok or covered roaster can be used in its place if one does not have a steamer (just make sure to keep the steaming plate above the boiling water).

How do you steam food at home?

When steaming dishes, be sure that the components are not completely submerged in the liquid. Place a collapsible pot or a Chinese bamboo steamer over a saucepan of simmering water, then add the dishes you wish to steam and cover with a lid. Cover the pot and bring the water to a boil before reducing the heat to a simmer. Dishes that are steamed take a different amount of time to cook than other foods.

How do you make fluffy steamed buns?

WHAT MAKES SOFT AND FLUFFY STEAMED BUNS? WHAT MAKES SOFT AND FLUFFY STEAMED BUNS?

  1. It’s the flour you’re using. Here are some recipes that I’ve tried and that my family enjoys: Oil. It’s similar to how oil helps to keep dough pliable and not dried out (kind of like a moisturizer), which is common in many recipes. Yeast. You can use active dry yeast, instant yeast (which is what I use), and fresh yeast
  2. However, active dry yeast is not recommended. Kneading

How long do you steam Bao buns for?

Each bun should remain on its paper square until it is transferred to a bamboo steamer placed over an inch of boiling water.

Cover and steam for 9 to 11 minutes, or until the rice is puffed. That’s all there is to it!

Can I use ceramic plate for steaming?

It should be feasible to use a steamer basket within the cooker pot; however, I would advocate using only the steamer basket itself if at all possible; stainless steel is quite safe. Ceramic or stainless steel bowls and dishes should be OK, and they are less likely to leach harmful substances into your food if they are used properly.

Can you steam in a microwave?

Put them in a microwave-safe plate and heat them up. If you’re steaming numerous pieces, increase the amount of water to 1-2 teaspoons (a little more if necessary). Put the dish in the microwave and cover it with a lid to keep the steam in. Set the microwave on the highest setting!

How do you steam dumplings at home?

Fill the pot with a few inches of water, bring it to a boil, and then reduce the heat to a medium simmer. Place a small amount of sesame oil on the dish and then as many dumplings as will fit on top of it (without crowding). Remove plate from pot and gently place it on top of the foil balls, then cover pot with a lid. Allow for 7-8 minutes of steaming time, or until the chicken is cooked through.

Can you cook dumplings on their own in the oven?

Yes, you may bake them in the oven; however, they must be cooked in some sort of liquid or else they will not be genuine dumplins; instead, they will be biscuits. Alternatively, a steamer can be used to steam dumplins. I make blackberry dumplings in the crockpot, as well as chicken and dumplings on the stovetop, all of which are delicious.

Can you steam buns in a metal steamer?

Metal Pan Steamer is the first recommendation. Greaseproof paper should be used to line the metal steamer, as this will protect it. Do not overfill the container with water. Avoid letting your bao come into contact with the sides of the metal steamer, since the sides of the metal steamer might become rather wet. Using a clean tea towel, cover the pan to collect any condensation, and then set the lid on top of the pan.

How do you steam Bao buns?

Fill a broad saucepan halfway with water, about 1 inch (3 cm) deep. Bring the water to a boil over medium heat, then drop the bamboo steamer into the pot and cover it with the lid. Reduce the heat to a simmer and allow the buns to steam for 6 minutes before serving.

How do you steam buns with a steamer?

Set a big steamer rack (bamboo steamer) inside a large pot (or wok) and fill the pot with enough water to come halfway up the sides of the rack, then bring the pot to a boil. Reduce the heat to a slow, steady boil. Place the buns in a steamer rack and steam for 10 minutes (do not let buns touch). Cover closely and steam for approximately 3 minutes, or until the buns are puffed and cooked all the way through.

How to Steam Food Without a Steamer Basket

When it comes to single-use tools, especially those that aren’t utilized very often, I am not a huge admirer of the concept at all. Particularly unpopular with me are single-use tools that are only sometimes utilized and take up a lot of storage space. In this list of “kitchen basics,” one of these products is the steamer, which is enormous and bulky and not frequently used yet is still included. Instead of spending $20 and taking up valuable shelf space, try one of these DIY steamers instead if you find yourself in need of one.

  • Don’t Miss Out on These 10 Ingenious Substitutions for Specialized Kitchen Tools

1. Build a Pie Tin Steamer

With just two reusable aluminum pie tins, you can construct a surprisingly effective steamer. To begin, poke 12–16 holes in the bottom of both pie tins with a needle. Then, using a rolling pin, flatten one of the pie pans until it is completely flat. Make no effort to get it perfectly flat; this is all about convenience, so simply run your rolling pin over the tin a few times to flatten it. You’re now ready to assemble your steamer’s components. Place the tin, which is structurally sound, upside-down in a pot filled with a small amount of water.

You’ll have a perfect steamer in action as soon as you turn on the heat! It’s even possible to construct a multi-layer steamer if you want to get really complicated.

2. Use a Strainer or Colander

This steamer hack is as straightforward as they come. All that is required is that you place your meal in a wide kitchen strainer and set it on top of your pot of boiling water to cook. You can also use a colander instead of a strainer to accomplish this. Image courtesy of James Ransom/Food52.

3. Repurpose a Cooling Rack

If you want to build a quick and simple steamer, simply place a cooling rack over the top of your pot of boiling water, arrange your contents on top of the cooling rack, and cover with aluminum foil. Remember to use a cooling rack with no gaps larger than the food you’re steaming, or else you’ll wind up with a bunch of cooked vegetables sitting at the bottom of your pot! Image courtesy of James Ransom/Food52.

4. Use a PlateSome Foil

This recipe is easy to prepare and makes cleanup a breeze because the meal is served on a plate rather than a plate of utensils. To begin, you’ll need to select a plate that is oven-safe and is just a little bit smaller than the pot you’ll be using. Image courtesy of James Ransom/Food52. Next, form three huge, firm balls of aluminum foil and set them in the bottom of your pot to prevent them from exploding. To make a steamer, fill a large plate halfway with water, then set the plate (with contents) on top of the aluminum foil balls.

5. Use a Splatter ScreenBowl

If you’re not steaming a lot, you may also use a splatter screen to protect your surfaces. Simply place it on top of your pot, arrange your vegetables on top of them, and cover with a big bowl. (This procedure is particularly effective for sticky rice.) Image courtesy of Food Canon If you don’t have a splatter screen on hand, you may make due with tinfoil instead of using it. Simply ensure that it fits securely around the pot in order to prevent it from collapsing when you place the meal on top of it.

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Brady Klopfer/Food Hacks provided the photographs (unless otherwise specified)

Steamed bao buns

  • 525g plain flour, with a little more for dusting
  • 525g butter
  • 12-tablespoon caster sugar, plus a pinch
  • 1 teaspoon quick-action dry yeast
  • 50mL milk, 1 tablespoon sunflower oil, plus additional for brushing on top and rubbing on the bottom of the bowl
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

Method

  • STEP 1Combine the flour, caster sugar, and 12 tsp salt in a large mixing basin until well combined (see tip). 1 tbsp warm water to dissolve the yeast and a pinch of sugar, then add it to the flour along with the milk, sunflower oil, rice vinegar, and 200ml water to make a dough. Bring everything together to form a dough, adding a little additional water if necessary
  • STEP 2Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead for 10-15 minutes, or until it is smooth and elastic. Placing the dough in a lightly oiled basin and covering it with a moist towel, allow it to rise for 2 hours, or until it has doubled in size. TO COMPLETE STEP 3: Dump the dough onto a clean work area and punch it down. Rolling out with your hands to flatten the dough, sprinkle over the baking powder, and knead for 5 minutes
  • SIXTH STEP: Roll out the dough into a long sausage form that is approximately 3cm thick, then cut into pieces that are approximately 3cm broad – you should have 18 pieces total. Roll each piece of dough into a ball in the palm of your hand and let aside to rest for 2-3 minutes
  • Then, one by one, using a rolling pin, flatten out each ball into an oval form that is approximately 3-4mm thick. Oil the dough ovals’ surfaces with a pastry brush, then brush a little oil over the end of a chopstick. Place a greased chopstick in the center of each oval and press down. STEP 6Cut 18 squares of baking paper and place a bun on each square. Fold the dough over the chopstick and slowly take the chopstick out of the dough. Transfer to a baking pan, cover with a clean tea towel, and let to prove in a warm area for 1 hour 30 minutes, or until doubled in size
  • STEP 7: Preheat a large steamer over a medium-high heat until it is steaming. To steam the buns, steam them for 8 minutes, or until they are puffed up (you may need to do this in batches). Open each bun and stuff with our barbecued pork and pickled carrot mooli (recipe below). Consume them while they are still warm.
See also:  How To Do Braided Buns
RECIPE TIPS

Up to the conclusion of step 3, the dough may be readily prepared in a mixer fitted with a dough hook.

FREEZING THE BUNS

The buns can be frozen once they have been cooked. Simply reheat in a steamer once it has been defrosted.

Goes well with

Recipe adapted from the February 2015 issue of Good Food magazine.

How to make Bao

As of August 2021, this post has been updated to reflect current information. I’ve decided to donate all of the advertising money produced by this blog article in the wake of recent racially motivated attacks and hate crimes against Asian people (any previous ad revenue generated in 2021 as well as revenue from the remainder of 2021) A network for East and South East Asian individuals in the United Kingdom is tobesea.n. As well as other essential efforts to achieve equity for this marginalized community, they aim to combat negative perceptions and give materials to promote a positive depiction of ESEA persons in the United Kingdom media.

These soft and fluffy steamed buns are incredibly delicious, and they’re usually not too expensive to buy in large quantities.

Because the prospect of steaming bread might be intimidating, I’ve gone into as much detail as I possibly can here. My family and I have cooked these several times at home, and while I am by no means an expert, I believe I can provide some suggestions based on what I have learned.

Contents:

  1. Videos on how to roll and shape bao
  2. A bao recipe What is a bao bun, and where can I get one? Is it possible to create vegan bao? What is the best way to steam bao? Is it possible to freeze bao? What is the best way to reheat frozen bao? What is the best way to keep steamed buns warm? What’s up with my bao? It’s not white. Is it possible to make wholewheat bao?

A version of this recipe was adapted from School of Wok – Jeremy Pang.

  • The following ingredients: 420g (3 1/2 cups) plain white flour (all-purpose flour), plus more flour for kneading
  • 2 1/4 tsp (1/4 oz or 7g) quick bake yeast (instant yeast)
  • 2 1/4 tsp (1/4 oz or 7g) instant yeast
  • Baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 250 g (1 cup) warm water
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus enough for the bowl and brushing
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder

Make the doughfirst rise:

  • In a large mixing basin, combine the flour, yeast, sugar, and salt. Stir everything together to ensure that it is well-combined. To make a rough dough, combine the warm water and vegetable oil in a mixing basin until it comes together. Empty the contents of the bowl onto a work surface and knead them together, dusting lightly with additional flour if necessary to keep the dough from sticking to the surface (just try to add as little extra flour as possible). Knead the dough for around 10 minutes
  • It will be slightly sticky and rather soft, but it should be flexible and smooth when finished. A stand mixer with the dough hook attachment can also be used to make the dough, if that is what you prefer. Extra vegetable oil should be poured into the bowl you were previously using. Toss the dough into the pan and turn to coat it with oil. Remove from the heat and set aside for 1 hour to rise until doubled in volume (I put it in my oven with the door closed and a baking tray full of boiling water on the rack below – this creates an ideal warm, steamy atmosphere for the dough to rise in)
  • Once the dough has doubled in size, turn it out onto your work surface and pat it into a large rectangle with your hands. Sprinkle the baking powder evenly over the surface of the dough, roll it up, and then knead for another 5 minutes to ensure that all of the baking powder is integrated.

Shape the bunssecond rise:

  • Divide the dough into 20 pieces that are equal in size. Toss each one of them into a ball and sprinkle them with more flour as required to keep them from sticking to the work surface
  • Make 20 pieces of baking paper, each about 3.5 inches (9 cm) wide
  • Assemble the squares as follows: Take each ball of dough and flatten it out into an oval approximately 3.5 by 4.5 inches in size, then cut it into squares (9 x 12 cm). Vegetable oil should be lightly brushed onto the surface of each oval before baking it. Each oval should be folded in half to form a half-moon shape. Place the individual squares of baking paper on top of the molds. Allow them to rise for 20 minutes on your counter to allow them to become a little puffy

Steam the buns:

  • Remove some of the risen buns from the oven and gently place them into your bamboo steamer – I can fit 3 buns in each layer of my steamer, for a total of 6 buns. Make cautious not to squash the buns when you do this, so drop them into the pan by grabbing the corners of the baking paper square with your fingers. Leaving room for expansion is also important since the buns will rise even higher after they are steamed
  • Be careful not to let them touch one other or the rims of your steamer or they will cling together. Place the remaining risen buns on a baking sheet and place them in the refrigerator to prevent them from overproofing while the first batch steams
  • Fill a broad saucepan halfway with water, about 1 inch (3 cm) deep. Bring the water to a boil over medium heat, then drop the bamboo steamer into the pot and cover it with the lid. Reduce heat to a simmer and let the buns steam for 6 minutes, or until they are cooked through. Allow it to cool slightly before removing it from the steamer so that you can steam the next batch
  • You may need to top up the water to keep the steamer from running out of water (you can take the dough straight from the fridge, there is no need to let it warm up first)
  • Eat the buns while they’re still warm! You may reheat them once more by steaming them for about 2 minutes longer if they have cooled down.

FREEZING BUNS:

  • Steam all of the buns according to the directions above. Allow the mixture to cool to room temperature before placing it on a baking sheet (with the baking paper squares still attached). Place the tray in the freezer for 1-2 hours, or until it is firm. Place the frozen buns in a resealable plastic bag that has been labeled and dated. Keep frozen for up to 3 months
  • To reheat, place frozen buns into a steamer and steam until warm. Steam for 5-8 minutes, or until the interior is boiling hot.
  • If you don’t have easy bake/instant yeast, you may substitute melted butter or lard in lieu of the vegetable oil if you want a softer outcome. If you don’t have easy bake/instant yeast, you can substitute a dry yeast mix in place of the water in the dough. In a large mixing basin, combine the yeast and warm water
  • Leave aside for 5 minutes to allow the mixture to bubble up before pouring into the flour, salt, sugar, and oil mixture.

What is a bao bun?

To be honest, naming these bao buns is inaccurate (bao is a Chinese word that meaning bun, so calling them bao buns would be like calling them bun buns). They’re commonly referred to as gua bao, but they’re also referred to be Taiwanese hamburgers in some circles. Although its popularity in the West has expanded with the redundant term bao buns, we find ourselves in this situation. The most common filling is glazed pork belly, although you can very much stuff them with anything you want. In terms of vegetarian fillings, I believe the following formula works well: grilled/deep fried veggies (or tofu/seitan) + anything crunchy (lettuce, carrot ribbons, shredded cabbage) with sauce + pickles (kimchi, red onion/radish, kraut).

Where can I buy bao?

Although I enjoy cooking from scratch, there are times when I simply want something quick and fast, and frozen bao are a blessing in this situation. I get frozen bao in bulk from the large chest freezers in my neighborhood Chinese food store. They go by a number of different names, including ‘gua bao’, ‘double slice bun’, ‘Hirata bun’, and ‘Taiwan burger bun’, among others. If you want to manufacture them yourself, though, continue reading.

Can I make vegan bao?

Yes! Unless otherwise specified, the recipe below is vegan (with non-vegan substitutions available if desired). Because I only use water and vegetable oil in this recipe, it is extremely simple to prepare. In addition, they are just as fluffy and soft as the ones made with milk and cream. In addition, I have a couple of vegan filling options: –Bao with Grilled Asparagus–Bao with Gochujang Tofu

How do you steam bao?

When I lived in Leeds, I bought a 2-layer bamboo steamer from a Korean grocery, which I still have. Online or at bigger Korean, Chinese, or Japanese food stores are good places to look for them. In the absence of a bamboo steamer, a metal steamer will suffice; however, you will not be able to fit as many buns into it as you would with a bamboo steamer (as they are stackable). In order to properly steam bamboo, set the steamer into a large saucepan or pot that it can fit comfortably inside. Fill the pan halfway with water; I normally fill it to about an inch deep and top it off as required while steaming to keep it from drying out.

The most crucial is that the water level does not rise over the base of the steamer, since you do not want the water to come into direct touch with whatever is in the steamer.

Cover with the lid and steam for 20-30 minutes.

Allow the buns to steam for 5-6 minutes before removing the cover to prevent the buns from being overcooked. I use a pair of kitchen tongs to carefully remove each layer of the bamboo steamer from the pan in order to avoid being burned by the steam.

Can you freeze bao and can you reheat frozen ones?

When I make bao, I normally prepare a large batch so that I can freeze the majority of them for later use as quick meals. To accomplish this, steam all of the bao per to package directions. Once they are all lined up on a baking sheet, leave the small paper square on the bottom of each bun so that it may be used to warm them later. Freeze the buns for 1-2 hours on a baking sheet before transferring them to a resealable bag. Make a note of the date and label them for future reference. You may reheat the bao straight from the freezer; simply place a couple into your steamer and steam for 5-8 minutes, or until the bao is heated in the center.

How do you keep steamed buns warm?

Keep them steaming in the bamboo steamer with the lid tightly closed. They should remain heated in this position for around 10 minutes. Cooking all of the bao ahead of time and reheating them one at a time by steaming for 1-2 minutes before serving them is my preferred method when serving them for supper. As a result, you will always have hot ones to eat.

Why are my bao not white?

The addition of baking powder/bicarbonate of soda to the dough may result in the dough being yellow after it has been steamed. If you don’t properly knead the baking powder into the dough, you may notice that the buns will have small yellow spots on them (this is only an aesthetic issue; the buns will still taste delicious). If you use unbleached flour, which is what most people in the UK use, your buns will not be as white as they may be, which is why they are yellow. If you’re truly wanting that pure white appearance, you may purchase bleached white flour from various Chinese grocery chains.

Can I make wholewheat bao?

Yes! Simply use wholemeal (wholewheat) bread flour for one-third of the flour in the following recipe. They’ll be a little denser and chewier than usual, but they’ll still be wonderful. The use of 50% or 100% wholemeal flour would result in buns that are overly thick and lack fluffiness; this is something I would avoid.

Steamed Bao Buns

Detailed instructions and photographs on how to create the ideal, soft, and fluffy steamed bao buns. To make the perfect homemade bao buns, follow these tips and tricks. They’ll be perfect for stuffing with your favorite ingredients. In this section, you will find instructions for steaming bao buns on the stovetop and in a steam oven.

Bao Buns

It was about 2004 that David Chang introduced his version of Pork Belly Buns to the menu of his restaurant, Momofuku Noodle Bar in New York, and no one could have imagined that the modest bao buns would go on to become an international gastronomic sensation. Even I made a point of getting a table at Momofuku every time I was in New York, no matter how lengthy the line was. His concept of transforming a normal bao bun into a sandwich or hamburger of sorts, packed with delicious pork belly and a simple garnish of pickled cucumbers, was absolutely brilliant to me.

Homemade Bao Buns

Bao buns were not to be found in Zurich’s stores or restaurants (and this is still the case in 2019!

), so I set out to make my own using a recipe from David Chang’s cookbook, Momofuku, to make steamed bao buns from scratch. After a few years of experimentation (David Chang’s bao bun recipe yields almost 50 buns! ), I settled on the recipe below, which I use on a regular basis throughout the year.

Why This Recipe Works

  • Bao buns are a steamed bun that is light, fluffy, and pillowy in texture, and they are ideal for stuffing with your favorite ingredients. Make the bao buns anyway you like using this recipe
  • It’s all up to you. This recipe can be used to make bao buns that are filled or stuffed. Once the buns have been rolled out, all that is left to do is fill and shape them before allowing them to rise for the second time according to the recipe. After they’ve been cooked, the bao buns may be frozen and then warmed in the steamer
See also:  Why Are They Called Space Buns

Steamed Buns

Buns are traditionally circular in form, with a filling that is either char siu or minced pork mixed with slices of Chinese lap cheong sausage and boiled egg. Char siu pork is the most common filling, although other fillings are also popular. Steamed buns can also be cooked simple, that is, without any filling, to serve as an appetizer. Traditionally, in my family, we prepare simple steamed buns, which are circular in form and tied at the top with a twisted knot, to go with roast duck on Sundays.

Bao Buns Recipe

Traditionally made in China, Chinese steamed buns are circular in shape with an enclosed filling, which can be either char siu pork or a ground pork combination with slices of Chinese lap cheong sausage and boiled egg, depending on the region. Buns can also be cooked without any filling, which is known as “simple steamed buns.” Plain steamed buns (round in form with a twisted knot at the top), which are popular in my family, are commonly served alongside roasted pork belly or roasted duck. Nonetheless, somewhere along the line, someone had the brilliant idea of creating folded over steamed buns that could be opened up and filled with a variety of things, much like a burger or sandwich.

How to Make Bao Buns

Bao buns are made with both yeast and baking powder, which helps the buns rise to their full potential. Begin by combining all of the dry ingredients in a large mixing basin and mixing well. Then, using a measuring jug, pour the heated water and oil into the pan. The water should be somewhat warmer than lukewarm in order to aid in the activation of the yeast, but it should not be boiling hot.

Step 2

The dough for my bao buns is made in my electric stand-mixer; however, you may certainly create everything by hand if you so choose. Using a dough hook on a medium speed, incorporate the liquid components into the dry ones. If you are using a different type of flour than that specified in the recipe, you may require more or less liquid than that specified. You just need a small amount of liquid to bring everything together into a soft dough. Next, with the mixer still running on medium speed, knead the dough until it is soft and smooth to the touch.

Step 3

After the dough has become soft and smooth, I recommend kneading it by hand for a few more minutes on the kitchen counter top to finish it off. In order to determine whether the dough is ready, push your finger into the dough and produce an imprint in the dough. If the dough bounces back, it indicates that it is ready.

If the imprint is still visible, you will need to knead the dough a little longer. Place the ball of dough back into the (clean) mixing basin and set the bowl somewhere warm for around 60 to 90 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size, to rise and expand.

Step 4

As soon as the dough has doubled in size, punch it down and knead it by hand for around 5 minutes to remove any air bubbles that may have formed in the dough. Afterwards, roll out the dough until it is approximately one centimeter in height. Rub a small amount of oil onto the surface of the dough with your hands. Using this method, you will be able to avoid the dough from sticking together later on while shaping the buns.

Step 5

To cut out rounds from the dough, use an 8 cm (3 inch) diameter cookie cutter. Continue to re-roll the dough as needed until you have used up all of the dough in the recipe.

Step 6

Place the rounds on a small sheet of baking paper – I like to use plain white cupcake wrappers that I flatten with a rolling pin to make them easier to handle. This saves me the time and effort of having to cut a sheet of baking paper into little pieces before using it. Then, using a rolling pin, carefully flatten the dough to make the bun shape. Repeat with the remaining rounds.

Step 7

Set everything on a big baking sheet, cover with a tea towel, and set it aside somewhere warm for approximately 30 minutes to let the buns to rise again and become more puffed. It should have taken around 10 minutes for the bao buns to rise somewhat and puff out a little.

Step 8

In the meantime, heat the steamer on the stovetop (see notes below). The buns should be steamed in batches for 10 to 12 minutes, or until they are fluffy and soft, and the insides are cooked through.

How to Proof Dough

The yeast in the dough must be activated in a warm atmosphere in order for the dough to rise properly. You might try one of the following suggestions if you don’t have a warm spot in your house:

  • In the oven with the oven light turned on (this is only applicable to certain ovens)
  • On the lowest shelf of the oven, there is a baking plate filled with boiling water. Use approximately 1 litre (4 cups) of water, and top it up after approximately 1 hour of cooking
  • Cook at a low temperature of around 25-40°C (77-104°F) in the oven or a steamer oven

How to Steam Bao Buns

  1. Oven light on (works only for some ovens)
  2. In the oven with the door open
  3. On the bottom shelf of the oven, there is a tray of boiling water. Use around 1 litre (4 cups) of water, then top it up after approximately 1 hour of cooking. Low temperature (approximately 25-40°C
  4. 77-104°F) in the oven or a steamer oven is ideal.

Tips For Making Bao Buns

  • Plain flour (all-purpose flour) is fine for this recipe, as the cornflour (cornstarch) will aid in giving the buns a light and fluffy texture due to the addition of cornstarch. It is not necessary for the buns to be a blinding white as those available in Chinese restaurants
  • Nonetheless, the taste and texture should remain the same. To get the pure white appearance of buns found in Chinese restaurants, I recommend using bleached flour, which can be obtained at Asian grocery shops or online. In order for the dough to rise properly, it must be kneaded for the necessary period of time. It is possible that failing to knead the dough adequately can result in buns that are blotchy in appearance (but still taste delicious), and this is due to not mixing the ingredients together well enough and/or failing to remove all of of the air bubbles from the dough. To prevent the buns from becoming soggy, steam them on a low-medium heat until they are just cooked through.

How to Make Steamed Bao Buns with a Steam Oven

The following methods should be followed for proving the dough as well as steaming the bao buns in an electric steam oven or a combi-steam oven:

  1. Make bao buns in a steam oven or a combi-steam oven by following the methods outlined below for proving the dough and steaming the bao buns: 1.

Freezing Bao Buns

Bao buns are ideally consumed fresh, and as soon as they are steamed, if at all possible. Bao buns can be preserved in zip-lock bags in the freezer for up to two months if they are not used immediately. To reheat frozen bao buns, just steam them for about 5 minutes, or until they are thoroughly warmed through.

What to Serve with Bao Buns

One of my favorite ways to serve bao buns is to stuff them with char siu pork and pickled veggies that I make in a flash. For further information, please refer to my recipe for Sticky Pork Bao Buns. Other excellent fillings for bao buns include the following: Braised Short Ribs with Asian Flavors Pickled Chillies, Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Siu Pork), and other condiments Print

Steamed Bao Buns

★★★★★4.8from32reviews

  • The resting time is 2 hours, the preparation time is 1 hour, the cooking time is 10 minutes, and the total time is 1 hour 10 minutes. This recipe makes 12-16 buns. Recipe Type:Bread
  • Cooking Method:Stovetop
  • Cuisine:Chinese

Instructions on how to create the ideal, soft and fluffy steamed bao buns, complete with images. To create the ultimate handmade bao buns, follow these tips and methods. They’ll be excellent for stuffing with your favorite fillings. There are directions for steaming the bao buns on the stovetop and in a steam oven included in the recipe.

Ingredients

  • With step-by-step images, learn how to create the ideal, soft and fluffy steamed bao buns. To make the perfect homemade bao buns, follow these tips and tricks. They’ll be perfect for stuffing with your favorite ingredients! There are instructions for steaming the bao buns on the stovetop and in a steam oven included in this cookbook.

Instructions

In order to prepare the buns

  1. In a large mixing bowl or the bowl of an electric stand-mixer (if using), combine all of the dry ingredients
  2. Mix well. Using a measuring jug, pour the heated water and oil into the pan. The water should be somewhat warmer than lukewarm in order to aid in the activation of the yeast, but it should not be boiling hot. Mixing the liquid components into the dry ingredients using the dough hook at a medium speed is recommended. If you are using a different sort of flour than what is specified in the recipe, you may require more or less liquid than is specified in it. Continue kneading the dough on medium speed until the dough becomes soft and silky to the touch until you’ve achieved a sticky dough consistency. This should take around 10 minutes with a stand mixer on medium speed, or approximately 5 minutes if done manually. After the dough has become soft and smooth, I recommend kneading it by hand for a few more minutes on the kitchen counter top until it is elastic. Replacing the ball of dough in the (now-empty) mixing bowl
  3. Use some cling film or a disposable bowl cover to keep the bowl covered. Placing the bowl in a warm location for 60 to 90 minutes will allow the dough to rise and double in size.

In order to form the buns

  1. To remove any air bubbles that may have formed in the dough, punch it back and knead it by hand for around 5 minutes after it has doubled its size. Then, using a rolling pin, roll out the dough until it is approximately 1 cm in height. Rub a little oil into the surface of the dough with your hands
  2. To cut out rounds from the dough, use an 8 cm (3 inch) cookie cutter. Re-roll the dough as many times as necessary. Place these circles on a small piece of baking paper – I prefer to use simple white cupcake wrappers that I flatten with a rolling pin – and set them aside to dry. Fold each circle in half and then gently flatten the dough with a rolling pin to make the bun shape
  3. Set everything on a big baking sheet, cover with a tea towel, and set it aside somewhere warm for approximately 30 minutes to let the buns to rise again and become more puffed. After this period of time, the bao buns should have inflated up a little.

To remove any air bubbles that may have formed in the dough, punch it back and knead it by hand for around 5 minutes after it has twice its original size; Roll out the dough until it is approximately 1 cm in height; then cut into squares. Rub a little oil onto the surface of the dough with your hands. To cut out rounds from the dough, use an 8 cm (3 inch) cookie cutter; If necessary, reroll the dough. Place these circles on a small piece of baking paper – I prefer to use simple white cupcake wrappers that I flatten with a rolling pin – and set them aside to cool.

Set everything on a big baking sheet, cover with a tea towel, and set it aside somewhere warm for approximately 30 minutes to allow the buns to rise once more.

The bao buns should have swelled up a little bit at this point.

  1. In the meantime, prepare the steamer on the stove (see the Kitchen Notes section below). Puff and soften the buns by steaming them in batches for 10 to 12 minutes or until they are completely cooked through
  2. Serve the buns as soon as possible.

Kitchen Notes

The many types of yeast* Please keep in mind that there is a difference between instant yeast (also known as quick dried yeast or fast-action dried yeast) anddried yeast while baking (also calledactive dry yeast). When in doubt about the sort of yeast you have, look for instructions on how to utilize it on the package. If you use instant yeast, you may add it right to the flour mixture without having to wait for it to activate first. If you don’t have instant yeast, I would recommend using the same quantity of dried yeast as you would with instant yeast.

  • Add this yeast mixture, along with the vegetable oil, to the dry ingredients in the recipe above.
  • Although the buns will be a pale yellow in color, they will taste delicious.
  • INSTRUCTIONS FOR STEAMING BAO BUNS* Place the steamer basket (whether bamboo or other material) directly on top of a saucepan that has the same size and shape.
  • * Place the steamer basket on top of the saucepan.
  • * Place the lid on top of the steamer basket.
  • How to Make Bao Buns in a Steam Oven*First Proof: Cover the bowl with cling film or a re-usable bowl cover to prevent the buns from drying out.
  • There is no need to wrap the buns with plastic wrap.
  • * Preparing the Bao Buns by steaming them: Take the tray of bao buns out of the steam oven/combi-steam oven and set it aside.
  • As soon as the steam oven/combi-steam oven has reached the desired temperature, return the tray of bao buns to the oven and steam them for 10-12 minutes.

To reheat frozen steamed buns, place them in a stovetop steamer for approximately 5 minutes, or until they are completely warmed through. CONVERSIONSIf you need to convert from cups to grams, or vice versa, you may use this handyConversion Chart for Fundamental Ingredients.

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This recipe was initially published on May 17, 2019 and has since been updated. More detailed recipe notes have been added to the original version.

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