How To Make Japanese Meat Buns

Nikuman (Steamed Pork Buns) 肉まん

In an airtight container, you may store the cooked bao until they are needed. Reheat thawed frozen bao by covering them with a moist paper towel. Bao should be microwaved in 30-second increments until it is fluffy and warm. 226.9kcal|33.5g carbohydrates|9.7g protein|5.5g fat|3.3g saturated fat |17.9mg cholesterol |206.8mg sodium | 143.4mg potassium |0.9g fiber|4.3 g sugar|0.1 mg vitamin C | 43.9 mg calcium| 1.7 mg iron Course:Appetizer Cuisine:Chinese Steamed dumplings (char siu bao) are a kind of char siu bao (char siu).

Watch How To Make Nikuman (Steamed Pork Buns)

Learn how to cook Nikuman (Japanese Steamed Pork Buns) at home with this instructional video! Served in delicate fluffy buns, this dish is stuffed with tender juicy pork, shiitake mushrooms, cabbage, and scallions.

What isNikuman(肉まん)?

It is also known asChka Man in Japan. Nikuman is the Japanese name for the Chinese dish baozi (,), which is also known asChka Man in Japanese. Traditionally, steamed buns are constructed of a flour dough that is then filled with meat and other ingredients. These individuals are referred to as Buta Man () in western Japan, which includes Osaka. The savory buns are normally steamed inside a bamboo steamer, and they are at their finest when they are served fresh and fluffy immediately from the steamer.

A variety of hot steamed chka man are available in convenience shops around Japan throughout the winter months, including Nikuman, Kare–man (curry taste), An–man (with red bean paste), and Pizza–man (pizza flavor).

As a tiny child, I recall my mother saying something similar.

Homemade Nikuman

My mother used to buy pre-packaged steamed buns from the grocery store, and they were, as far as I recall, rather tasty. My high school friend’s house for lunch years ago convinced me that this dish was something we could all create at home. I had no idea it was possible! She prepared handmade nikuman for us, and I was particularly struck by the fact that she cooked the pig buns herself. To my amazement, she informed me that they are quite simple to prepare. Because they were freshly baked, the buns were really delicious, and everyone enjoyed them.

Considering that you can buy pre-packaged steamed buns at the grocery store, you might ask if it’s really worth your time to cook them yourself.

Why Make Nikuman at Home:

  • Healthier– Prepackaged steamed buns are more likely to have additions or substances that are less than desirable. It’s a whole different experience when you prepare the buns from scratch. Customization– Don’t eat pork? No problem. Then for the fillings, you may use any ingredients you choose. Vegetarian or vegan options are available. These steamed buns are made specifically for you! I prefer to make them in two sizes: large ones for adults and little ones (such as the one featured in today’s recipe) for children. An accessible recipe– I was overjoyed when I found how simple it was to create my own steamed buns from scratch. Watch my video and then follow the step-by-step directions to complete the project. When you try the recipe, you’ll realize how simple and uncomplicated it is. Enjoy a delectable and refreshing taste– There is nothing better than eating food that has been freshly prepared in your own home. Steamed buns are without a doubt one of those foods. These nikuman have a wonderful, fresh flavor and are really filling. Freezer-friendly– Leftovers may be stored in the freezer and warmed quickly for subsequent use.

Making these steamed buns does present a few minor difficulties, but nothing too difficult to deter anybody from giving the dish a shot!

The Challenges:

  • This recipe takes some time since you have to let the dough to rest, which is required for nice steamed buns. Technique for wrapping and folding steamed buns– Getting the steamed buns to appear presentable will take some effort. But don’t be concerned. As part of the recipe (Step 18) and my video instruction, I’ll demonstrate an EASYMETHOD to ensure that you can follow along with confidence

Mastering The FoldingPleating for Steamed Pork Buns

This is the section that most people are intimidated about. Since I first published my recipe, I’ve folded the dough using the SIMPLE METHOD I described in the post (Step 18). My Nikuman was delicious, but the appearance might be improved. When my friend Maggie ofOminivore’s Cookbook released her Kimchi Pork Steamed Bunrecipe on YouTube, she demonstrated her mother’s folding and pleating method in the process. Since then, I’ve continued to wrap my nikuman in the same manner. I still have a lot of work to do to better my abilities, but the strategy has made a significant difference.

In either case, the nikuman is delicious.

PS: If you liked these steamed pork buns, I recommend that you try outShumaiandManjutoo as well!

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Nikuman (Steamed Pork Buns)

  • It is a traditional Japanese dish that consists of steamed buns that are filled with delectable savoury pork, shiitake mushrooms, cabbage, and scallion. Make this popular snack at home with these simple instructions! Preparation time: 1 hour Cooking Time: 10 minutes 1 hour of resting time Time allotted: 2 hours and 10 minutes

For the dough

  • All-purpose flour (simple flour), plus more for dusting (300 g (10.6 oz) is approximately 2 13 cups)
  • 10.6ozall-purpose flour (plain flour), plus more for dusting 2 tbsp sugar (the term “scant” refers to the fact that 2 tbsp is “just enough”). 2 Tablespoons granulated sugar (two tablespoons is 25 grams, but we only need 20 grams)
  • 12 teaspoons kosher or sea salt (I use Diamond Crystal
  • Use half for table salt)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 tablespoon neutral-flavored oil (vegetable, rice bran, canola, etc.)
  • 160-170 milliliters water (start with 160 milliliters of water and add more if necessary
  • Depending on the weather, you may need more or less)

For alternatives for Japanese condiments and ingredients, go to this page. For more information on Japanese ingredients, see this page.

  • Assemble all of the materials
  • In a large mixing bowl, combine 10.6 ounces flour, 2 tablespoons sugar, 12 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon quick dry yeast, and 1 tablespoon oil. Mixing with chopsticks or a wooden spoon, slowly add 160-170 ml water into the mixture and mixing until it is fully integrated. To avoid the dough from clinging to your hands too much, lightly sprinkle them with flour before working with it. Knead the dough with your hand, pushing it down and reshaping it as necessary. Form it into a ball, then sprinkle flour on the work area to prevent sticking. Transfer the dough to a clean work area and begin kneading it. This is how I knead the dough. To begin, press the top half of the dough into the bottom half, pressing it slightly forward. Then, using the heel of your palm, press it forward twice more before pulling it back and folding it in half again. Then, turning the dough gently, repeat the procedure for another 10-15 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and silky in appearance. Sprinkle a little amount of flour over the dough at a time to help it become less sticky
  • Form the dough into a smooth, round shape, carefully tucking any loose ends beneath. Place the dough in a large mixing basin and coat the bottom of the bowl with oil. Cover it with plastic wrap and set it aside in a warm location for 30-60 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size. While you’re waiting for the dough to rise, prepare the filling ingredients. To begin, soak the dried shiitake mushrooms in 12 cup water for 30 minutes. Place something heavy on top of the shiitake so that the entire mushroom is immersed. Place in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes while you thinly slice the scallion. The cabbage should be chopped into 1″ (2.5 cm) pieces after the rough core has been removed. 1 teaspoon salt should be sprinkled over the chopped cabbage to take out extra water. Once the shiitake mushrooms have been soaked, wring out the excess liquid, cut away the stiff stem, and mince the mushroom tops. Combine the ground pork, scallions, and shiitake mushrooms in a large mixing basin. Make a mess of the cabbage by squeezing it with your hands and throwing it into the basin
  • 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 tablespoon sake, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, 1 tablespoon potato/corn starch, and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 tablespoon sake, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, 1 tablespoon potato/corn starch, and freshly ground black pepper Knead the ingredients thoroughly until it is properly blended and appears pale and sticky in appearance. Wait until the dough is done before setting it aside (or covering it with plastic wrap and placing it in the refrigerator). Once the dough has doubled in size, flour the work area and split the dough in half, then roll each half of the dough into a log. Repeat the process with the remaining dough. Then, cut each log into five equal pieces, and then cut each piece in half again. You can use fewer pieces of dough to make larger buns if you want them to be bigger. Because holding a large amount of dough and filling in one hand is difficult, it’s also better to work with smaller amounts of dough to create attractive pleats as you wrap. Form each piece of dough into a ball, then sprinkle the dough balls with flour to prevent them from adhering to one another during the baking process. Allow enough space between each ball and cover loosely with a moist dish cloth to prevent them from drying out. Allow them to rest for 10 minutes before rolling out a ball of dough and pressing it flat with your palm. Then, using a rolling pin, flatten it into a circular sheet of paper. Here’s how I roll the dough out for the cookies. Right hand: Hold the dough’s surface in place with the left hand while using a rolling pin to roll the dough out with the right hand All that is required is that you roll the dough up and down on the bottom half of it. After rolling the dough a couple of times, use your left hand to rotate it roughly 30 degrees. It is necessary to repeat this procedure until the dough becomes thin. The middle of the dough should be somewhat thicker than the outside of the dough. Filling: Scoop 1 12 tbsp of filling (I use a 1 12 tbsp cookie scoop) and lay it in the center of the dough. Holding the dough in the left hand and sealing the bun with the index finger and thumb of the right hand To begin, take a corner of the dough with your right index finger and thumb and squeeze it together with your other two fingers (left picture). Make a tight pinching motion with your thumb while turning the dough clockwise with your left hand (see right image). Repeat this procedure around 10-12 times (= 10-12 pleats) until you have sealed the last portion of the dough by pinching it securely (see right picture). Here are a few pointers: Your left thumb should be used to hold down the filling while your left fingers are used to flip the wrapper around. Make use of your left index finger to assist with the pleating. Additionally, while making the next pleat, raise up the pinched pleats a little bit to ensure that the filling remains inside the dough. Once you’ve finished sealing the last portion of the dough, twist the pleats even tighter using your right index finger and thumb to ensure a secure seal is maintained. If you’re left-handed, you’ll want to follow the guidelines in the other direction. Easy An alternative method is to wrap the filling by pulling the dough up around the meat to the top, producing tiny pleats with the excess dough, then slightly twisting the dough to seal it and pinching it tightly to connect the sides. Prepare a sheet of parchment paper that is large enough to accommodate the bun (for a small size, 3″ x 3″). Continue to cover the completed buns with plastic wrap and continue the process with the remaining dough until all of the dough has been used. Allow the buns to rest for 20 minutes before serving. Bring a pot of water to a boil and prepare a steamer. The buns and parchment paper should be placed in a steamer tray with approximately 2″ between each bun after the water has reached a boil (buns will get larger while being steamed). Close the cover and steam for 10 minutes on a high heat setting (10 for small buns, 13 for medium, 15 for big). For a standard saucepan, wrap the lid tightly with a kitchen cloth to avoid the condensation (which forms on the lid) from pouring into the buns while steaming them. Take pleasure in the moment

To Store

  • Assemble all of the materials
  • Assemble Place 10.6 ounces flour in a large mixing basin with scant 2 tablespoons sugar, 12 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon instant dry yeast, and 1 tablespoon oil. Stir until the mixture is well moistened. While continuing to combine the mixture with chopsticks or a wooden spoon, slowly add 160-170 ml water into the mixture and stir until well mixed
  • And To avoid the dough from clinging to your hands too much, lightly sprinkle them with flour. Knead the dough with your hand, pushing it down and reshaping it as needed. It should be formed into a ball, and flour should be sprinkled on the workspace. Spread out the dough on a clean work area and begin to work it. How I knead the dough is as follows: To begin, press the top half of the dough into the bottom half, pressing it slightly forwards. Then, using the heel of your palm, press it forward twice more before pulling it back and folding it in half once more. Then, turning the dough gently, repeat the procedure for another 10-15 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and silky in texture. Make little additions of flour to the dough at a time to help it become less sticky
  • Form the dough into a smooth, round shape by gently tucking any loose ends beneath. Place the dough in a large mixing basin and coat the bottom of the bowl with vegetable oil. Make the filling while you’re waiting for the dough to rise. Cover with plastic wrap and set it aside in a warm area until the dough has doubled in size, around 30-60 minutes. Pour 12 cups of water into a large mixing bowl and add the dried shiitake mushrooms. Submerge the shiitake completely by placing something heavy on top of it. After 15 to 20 minutes of resting time, thinly slice the scallions. The cabbage should be chopped into 1″ (2.5 cm) pieces after the rough core has been removed
  • 1 teaspoon of salt should be sprinkled over the chopped cabbage to take out any extra water before cooking. As soon as the shiitake mushrooms have been soaked, squeeze off the excess moisture and finely chop the mushroom tops. Ground pork, scallions, and shiitake mushrooms are mixed together in a large mixing dish. Squeeze the excess water out of the cabbage with your hands and place it in the mixing bowl
  • A. Grate the ginger and combine it with the spices (1 teaspoon sugar, 1 tablespoon sake, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, 1 tablespoon potato or corn starch, and freshly ground black pepper)
  • Set aside. Re-knead the mixture until it is well mixed, pale, and sticky in appearance. Wait until the dough is done (or cover it with plastic wrap and store it in the refrigerator). Once the dough has doubled in size, flour the work surface and split the dough in half, then roll each half of the dough into a log. Repeat this process with the remaining dough. Then, cut each log into five equal pieces, and then each piece in half. If you want to make larger buns, split the dough into fewer pieces. Because holding a large amount of dough and filling in one hand is difficult, it’s also simpler to work with smaller amounts of dough to create lovely pleats when wrapping. Using your hands, roll each piece of dough into a ball. Lightly sprinkle the dough balls with flour to prevent them from clinging to one another. Separate each ball and cover with a moist dish cloth to prevent them from drying out. Allow them to rest for 10 minutes before working with them. Take a ball of dough and flatten it with your hand. Once this is done, roll it out into a circular sheet with a rolling pin. How I roll out the dough is seen in the video below. Maintain control of the dough with your left hand while using your right hand to roll it out with a rolling pin. The bottom half of the dough just has to be rolled up and down once. After rolling the dough 1-2 times, use your left hand to rotate it around 30 degrees. Continue in this manner until the dough becomes thin (about 10 minutes). When making dough, the center should be somewhat thicker than the edges. Filling: Scoop 1 12 tbsp of filling (I use a 1 12 tbsp cookie scoop) and lay it in the center of the dough
  • Right index and middle fingers and thumb close the bun after it has been held in the left hand. To begin, take a corner of the dough with your right index finger and thumb and squeeze it together with your other two index fingers (left picture). Without moving your thumb, pick up the dough with your right index finger and pinch it with your thumb while rotating the dough clockwise with your left hand (right picture)
  • Repeat this process approximately 10-12 times (= 10-12 pleats) until you have sealed the last part of the dough by pinching it tightly. For starters, consider the following suggestions: The filling should be held in place with your left thumb, and the wrapper should be turned with your left hand. To assist with pleating, use your left index finger. Additionally, while making the next pleat, raise up the pinched pleats a little bit to ensure that the filling remains within the dough. Twist the pleats even further with your right index finger and thumb once you’ve finished sealing the last section of dough in order to preserve a tight seal. If you’re left-handed, you’ll want to follow the guidelines in the other direction. Easy An alternative method is to wrap the filling by pushing the dough up around the meat to the top, producing tiny pleats with the extra dough, then slightly twisting the dough to seal it and pinching it firmly to join the edges
  • Prepare a sheet of parchment paper that is large enough to accommodate the bun (for a modest size, 3″ × 3″ is sufficient). Wrap the finished buns in plastic wrap and proceed with the remainder of the dough as before. Finished buns are ready to serve. 20 minutes should be allowed for resting the buns Preparing the steamer: Bring the water to a boil. The buns and parchment paper should be placed on a steamer tray with approximately 2″ between each bun after the water has reached a boiling point (buns will get larger while being steamed). Steam for 10 minutes on high heat with the lid closed (10 for small buns, 13 for medium, 15 for big). For a standard saucepan, wrap the lid tightly with a kitchen cloth to avoid the condensation (which forms on the lid) from pouring onto the buns as you steam them. Right away, take pleasure in.
See also:  Where Can I Buy Steamed Buns

calories: 125kcal; carbohydrates: 14g; protein: 5g; fat: 5g; saturated fat:2g; cholesterol:12 mg; sodium: 138 mg; potassium: 93 mg; fiber: 1g; sugar: 2 g; vitamins: 16IU; vitamin C: 4mg; calcium: 23 mg; iron: 1 mg Courses include an appetizer, a main course, and a snack. Cuisine:Japanese JustOneCookbook.com has a recipe for pork buns and steam buns. The content and photos are protected by intellectual property rights. We invite you to share this dish with your friends and family. It is completely banned to copy and/or paste whole recipes into any website or social media platform.

If you make this dish, take a picture and tag it with the hashtag justonecookbook!

Similar Savory and Sweet Treats You’ll Enjoy:

  • In addition to Shumai (Steamed Pork Dumplings), there are Manju, Black Sesame Cookies, and Anpan (Sweet Red Bean Bun).

Steamed pork dumplings, Manju (Black Sesame Cookies), and Anpan (Sweet Red Bean Bun) are some of the dishes you may get in a Japanese restaurant.

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Japanse Pork Buns Recipe & Video

  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/4 cup all purpose flour (use blenched flour if you want completely white buns)
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour (use blenched flour if you want completely white buns)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 1 tablespoon oil (I used avocado oil). 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour (use blenched flour if you want completely white buns). You can use any oil with a light color and flavor (for example, vegetable, canola, or sunflower seeds)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

For the Filling

  • 1/2 medium size onion, chopped
  • 1/2 large leek, only the whitelight green part, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 4 oz ground pork
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp sake
  • 1/2 Tbsp sugar
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • Asian mustard or sriracha to taste

Instructions

  1. In a normal mixer, combine the yeast, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1/4 cup flour, and 1/4 cup warm water until well combined. Allow for 30 minutes of resting time before adding the remaining warm water, flour, salt, sugar, and oil to the yeast mixture. Knead the dough on a medium-low pace until it comes together in a single piece and the surface is smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and form it into a circular. Make use of the same mixing bowl that you used to make the dough and place the dough in it. It should be covered with plastic wrap and let to rise for 3 hours or until it has tripled in size
  2. Sprinkle the flour and baking powder on the work surface in an even layer and bring the dough together. Knead for 5 minutes at a time. Using a knife, cut the dough into eight pieces. Form each into a ball between your palms and roll it around in your hands. Place each ball on a baking sheet that has been lined with parchment paper. Set aside for 30 minutes with a slightly damp towel to allow the dough to double in size. Meanwhile, prepare the filling! In a large mixing bowl, combine all of the filling ingredients and thoroughly mix them together
  3. Now, bring one ball at a time to the work surface and slightly flatten it with your palm. To flatten the dough, use a rolling pin to flatten it into a 3″ circle, making sure the center is slightly thicker than the edges
  4. Place 3 to 4 Tablespoons of filling in the center and bring the edge to the top with your index finger and thumb to seal while pressing the filling into the center with your left thumb. Stretch and squeeze it until it takes on its final shape. Place the sealed pork bun on a steamer lined with parchment paper and continue the process with the other ingredients. Give the pork buns about 1 1/2 inches of space between them since they will expand in size as they are steaming. Allow the pork buns to rest for 10 to 15 minutes before bringing a wok of water to a boil. Bring a steamer rack filled with pork buns to a boil in a wok. Make certain that no water comes into contact with the steamer or the buns. Remove from the heat and steam for 15 minutes, or until the pork buns are fluffy and cooked through. It is necessary to remove the lid immediately after turning off the heat, or otherwise water would leak back onto the bun surface, resulting in yellowish “blisters” on the bun surface. Make sure to steam batches of buns until they’re all cooked through. Enjoy

Notes

How to Make a Freeze If you wish to freeze the buns, transfer them to a ziplock bag or other airtight container as soon as they are through cooking. Either pack them individually or make sure a piece of parchment paper is sandwiched between the buns before putting them together. Freeze the water quickly. When you’re ready to eat, say so. 1. Microwave in the original bag/container for 30 to 60 seconds on high. 2. Remove the bun from the bag/container and re-steam it for 5 minutes, or until it is completely heated throughout.

Remove the bun from the bag or container and place it in your rice cooker on the “warm” setting for approximately 1 hour.

Related

Get ready to sink your teeth into these fluffy and delectable steaming pork buns! Eating it feels like you’re biting into a fluffy cloud that is filled with flavor. These are steamed pork buns made in the Japanese style, loaded with a pig mince filling that has a more mild flavor profile than their Chinese equivalent. When consumed in moderation, they are a delectable and nutritious snack or lunch option. Although I understand that it is difficult to refrain from eating them since they are simply too good to pass up!

What are Steamed Pork Buns?

The Japanese dish of steamed pork buns (also known as “Nikuman” or “Butaman”) is comprised of very soft, steamed buns that are filled with a pig mince mixture. Their origins may be traced back to China, where they were later altered for use in Japanese cuisine, where they were given the name “Nikuman.” This name is formed from the Japanese words “niku” (meat) and “manju,” which is taken from the Chinese term “mantou” (steamed bun), respectively. They are also known as Butaman (from the Japanese word “buta,” which means pork), but this is a moniker that is more widespread in the Kansai region of Japan.

The Japanese variant, on the other hand, has a pork mince filling that is comparable to gyoza.

The steamed pork bun is often seen on the streets of Asian nations or on the menus of yum cha restaurants.

It is possible to find them in food markets, grocery shops, and convenience stores like 7-Eleven and Lawson, among other places, in Japan. In fact, these buns have grown so popular in recent years that you can now frequently find them frozen in shops all over the world.

What Are Steamed Pork Buns Made From?

A mixture of all-purpose flour, instant dry yeast, sugar, sea salt, and sesame seed oil will be needed to produce fluffy steamed buns that are soft and fluffy. Ground pig flesh, chopped scallions, soy sauce, sake, grated ginger, sesame seed oil, and sesame oil are all needed to make the delectable and flavorful pork filling.

How To Make Steamed Pork Buns?

The following is a schedule for the preparation of steamed pork buns, with complete directions provided in the recipe card below the timeline.

  1. Prepare the dough for the buns. Preparing the filling may be done while the dough is rising. Wrap the filling in the dough and set aside. The buns should be steamed.

What Equipment Do I Need?

Pork buns are traditionally prepared in a Bamboo Steamer Basket, which you have most certainly seen before. You need not be concerned if you do not have one of these devices since I will discuss other alternatives. If you happen to have a bamboo steamer, that’s fantastic! The only other materials you’ll need are parchment paper, a saucepan, and a gauze or muslin cloth to finish the project. This cloth will aid in the absorption of excess moisture, preventing the buns from becoming soggy during the baking process.

How To Make Steamed Pork Buns Without a Steamer?

You may use any other sort of steamer (stainless steel, etc.) or you can steam them in a conventional fry pan or an instant pot if you don’t have access to a bamboo steamer at this time.

Using a frying pan

For those who want to cook their buns in a skillet, warm vegetable oil in the skillet over medium heat before spacing them out by 0.8-1 inch (2-3cm). When the underside of the bun is browned, add 2/3 cup of water into the pan and cover it with a lid to allow the buns to steam for around 2-3 minutes. Remove the cover, reduce the heat to low, and continue to cook for another 5-6 minutes, or until all the liquid has evaporated completely. Increase the heat to high and toast the bottom for a minute to make it crispy.

Using a instant pot

Because every instant pot is different, please refer to the instructions that came with your instant pot for steaming. The basic procedure is to insert the steaming rack into the instant pot’s inner pot and pour 1 cup of water to the inner pot. Place the buns on a platter and place them on the steaming rack. When closing the lid, make sure that your steam release valve is in the’sealing’ position (see illustration). To steam for 5 minutes, use the’steam’ option on your device. Release the pressure on the lid and lift it up.

What To Serve With Steamed Pork Buns?

Because every instant pot is different, please refer to the instructions that came with your instant pot while steaming vegetables. Basically, pour 1 cup of water into the inner pot of the instant pot and insert the steaming rack into the pot to begin cooking. Stack the buns on a dish and put them on the steaming rack. Make sure your steam release valve is in the’sealing’ position before closing the lid. To steam for 5 minutes, select the’steam’ option from the menu bar. Lifting the lid will relieve the strain on the seal.

How to Store Steamed Pork Buns?

Butaman is best served immediately after preparation, however you may make a little too much and need to keep some. You can, in fact, do so rather easily. After Butaman has been steamed, it can be stored. Cool the pork buns entirely before wrapping them securely in a cling wrap sheet to prevent them from sticking together.

It will keep for approximately a month in the refrigerator. Reheat the buns in the microwave for 1-2 minutes, or re-steam them in the same manner as you did the first time you made them.

FAQ

Q: Do Steamed Pork Buns contain gluten? A: No. A: They are not, in fact. Gluten is included in the buns as well as the soy sauce used in the filling. To make this gluten-free, substitute gluten-free flour for the regular flour and use gluten-free soy sauce for the fillings and sauce.

Recipe Measurement

  • For example, to change the serving size, just click on the serving number and move the slider to either the left or right side to vary the amount. While moving the slider, the quantities of the components will vary in both imperial and metric measures in accordance with your selection.

Buns

  • 150 grams of ordinary flour 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons plus 2 tablespoons
  • 1/2 teaspoon quick dry yeast*1
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • A pinch of salt
  • 80 mL lukewarm milk 1 tablespoon sesame seed oil
  • 1/3 cup *2

Filling

  • 100 g of ground pork 1/2 cup
  • 1/4 cup finely sliced scallions
  • 1/2 teaspoon ginger
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce*3
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame seed oil
  • A dash of salt and pepper
  • 1 tablespoon salad oil for frying
  • Into a large mixing basin, sift the flour. Make a well in the flour and add the instant dry yeast and sugar. Stir until thoroughly combined. Pour in the lukewarm milk and whisk everything together
  • Knead the sesame seed oil and salt into the dough with your hands until it comes together. When all of the ingredients have been thoroughly blended, roll the mixture into a ball and cover it in plastic wrap. Allow it to rise for approximately 1 hour, or until the ball size has doubled. *4
  • During the time the dough is resting, prepare the filling. In a large mixing basin, combine all of the ingredients for the filling and knead until the dough becomes sticky. Divide the mixture into 6 equal amounts and form them into round mince patties with your hands. Set them aside for the time being. When the dough has doubled in size, remove it from the oven. Place it on a floured cutting board and cut it into six equal pieces
  • Each dough ball should be shaped into a circular circle. Squash each one with the palm of your hand. Using your finger tips, pinch the dough around the side of the bowl and roll it out with another hand. Using your rolling pin, squeeze and pull the dough to your front, then rotate the dough 30 degrees with your rolling pin again. This step should be repeated until the dough has been pushed out to a diameter of 4 inch (10cm)
  • Place the flattened dough in your palm and place the mince pattie on top of it
  • Grab a point on the edge of the dough and place the thumb on the point to serve as a pivot point. With the index finger, draw and form pleats by moving the dough in a clockwise manner while holding the dough in one hand. Tighten the aperture by pinching it with the thumb and index finger at the end. Repeat the procedure for a total of five more doughs. Place each bun on a piece of parchment paper
  • Arrange 2-3 buns, 0.8-1.2 inch (2-3cm) apart, in a bamboo steamer lined with muslin cloth
  • Steam for 15 minutes. Using a cover, steam the buns for 15 minutes over boiling water in a large saucepan. Remove the pan from the heat and serve
See also:  Where Can I Buy Pork Buns

*1 You can use fresh yeast in this recipe. 3 times the amount of fresh yeast is required. 2 Microwave for 20 seconds to make it lukewarm. 3 Coconut aminos or liquid aminos can be used in place of the soy sauce. See the section on Japanese cuisine substitutions. *4 The time is simply an indication because it is impacted by the temperature of the room. calorie count 215kcal|carbohydrate count 24g|protein count 5g|fat count 9g|saturated fat 3g|cholesterol count 13mg|sodium count 45mg|potassium count 272mg|fiber 0g|sugar count 4g|vitamin A 65IU|vitamin C 0.8mg|calcium count 96mg|iron count 1.5mg Show me how your Instagram experience went!

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Nikuman – Japanese steamed buns Recipe on Food52

Nikuman. Buns that are sluggish. Alternatively, you might say “lazy bones,” which would describe me. Again, I used a no-knead bread recipe that was packed with leftover pulled pork that I had cooked according to a David Chang recipe. The supreme ruler of all things porcine. Make these buns for a lunchbox for a construction worker or for a girlie Japanese tea party. They’re very wonderful. Alternatively, a picnic on a warm summer’s day might be enjoyed. It is possible that some will propose a cold glass of saké, preferably the best you can get your hands on.

Whatever you do, prepare yourself for a mouthwatering experience.

  • Preparation time: 3 hours and 15 minutes
  • Cooking time: 15 minutes This recipe makes 12 substantial buns or 24 tiny buns.
Ingredients
  • Nikuman (Japanese pork buns)
  • Portion bread dough (recipe follows)
  • Nikuman (Japanese pork buns)
  • Nikuman (Japanese cooking time: 4 ounces of cooked pulled (or fresh ground) pork 1 spring onion, white and green parts removed and coarsely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated fresh ginger
  • 2 teaspoons chili garlic sauce
  • 2 teaspoons light soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar, for cooking (optional)
  • A large egg lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons butter (chilled and chopped into pieces)
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
Directions
  1. A large egg lightly beaten
  2. 2 tablespoons butter (chilled and chopped into pieces)
  3. 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  4. 1 teaspoon salt
  5. 3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  1. Bread dough: In a large mixing basin (with a lid), add the warm water, freshly crushed yeast or active dried yeast, and salt – mix well to incorporate. It is not necessary to put aside any time for the yeast to ‘prove’ if you are using fresh yeast
  2. But, if you are using active dried yeast, set it aside for a few minutes until it is bubbling before adding the whisked egg, butter chunks, and sugar. Season with salt and then gradually add the flour, cup by cup, until everything is well combined. Use a dough whisk or an electric mixer to finish the process. Set aside on the counter for a couple of hours, lightly covered, until the dough has risen. Use immediately, or place in the refrigerator overnight to ‘enhance’ the flavor. If you’re using the overnight approach, gently grease the top of the dough and the top of the lid with a pastry brush before refrigerating

I’m passionate about food, and I’m interested in providing a platform for underrepresented perspectives as well as appreciating Nigerian cuisine as a whole.

How to Make Steamed Meat Bun (Nikuman) from Haikyu!

The snack is ready in 1 hour and 25 minutes. DifficultyMedium The following recipe for steamed beef bun (nikuman) from Haikyu is being shared with you today! (ハイキュー!) As a snack, it is frequently consumed by students on their walk home from school, as depicted in the anime Haikyuu. With so many rich ingredients crammed into the light and airy dough, just one piece will leave you feeling completely satisfied.

What is Nikuman?

It is a steamed bun that is produced by combining your favorite ingredients such as green onions and shiitake mushrooms with minced pork and wrapping it in a flour-based dough before steaming. It is referred to as BUTA-Man in the Kansai area of Japan (in the vicinity of Osaka). Warm steamed buns may be purchased from convenience stores in Japan during the winter months, which are located near the cash registers and are available for purchase.

You may also purchase pre-made steamed buns that can be cooked in a microwave oven, eliminating the need to create them from scratch.

What kinds of steamed buns are there in Japan?

Nikuman (meat bun) is the most popular sort of steamed bun in Japan, yet it is also the most expensive. Fillings such as pork, bamboo shoots, shiitake mushrooms, and other ingredients are often added to customize the taste of the finished product. The bread is light and fluffy, and the fillings are juicy and delicious. Buns with different flavors and textures have been developed in response to the nikuman, including red bean paste, curry, and pizza buns (all with different flavors). Premium meat buns, created from only the best cuts of meat, are also available on request.

Sauces for Nikuman

Freshly steamed buns are delectable on their own, but depending on the location, it is customary to serve them with a sauce. The Kyushu area, for example, prepares them with vinegar, soy sauce, and Japanese mustard paste before serving them. Kansai people prepare it with soy sauce, vinegar, and soy sauce, or Worcestershire sauce, according on their tastes. It astonished me when I found that they were served with soy sauce and Japanese mustard, because I grew up in an area where they were never served with any toppings.

How to Make Meat Bun (Nikuman) from Haikyu!

Preparation time: 1 hour and 15 minutes Cooking Time: 10 minutes 1 hour and 25 minutes is the total time. CourseSnackCuisineChinese, Japanese, and other cuisines

For the Dough

  • In Germany, 150gall of purpose flourtype 405 (in Germany), 50g of bread flourtype 550 (in Germany), 30g of sugar, 12tbsp instant yeast, 12 tbsp baking powder, 12 tbsp vegetable oil, a pinch of salt, and 100ml lukewarm water are required.

For the Filling

  • 150gground pork
  • 12 onion, minced
  • 1 tablespoon panko
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 12 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 12 tablespoon sugar
  • 12 tablespoon potato starch / corn starch
  • 12 teaspoon salt

To Make Dough

  • In a large mixing bowl, combine all of the ingredients for the dough, except for the lukewarm water, and well combine
  • Add lukewarm water a little at a time, kneading well after each addition for about 10-15 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and silky. The dough can be worked either in the bowl or on a work surface
  • Either method is acceptable. Roll out the dough into a smooth, round shape, gently tucking any loose ends beneath the dough. Place the dough in a bowl and wrap it tightly with plastic wrap to keep it from drying out. Wait for the dough to double in size, which should take 30-60 minutes. (about 40 minutes at 35 degrees Celsius)

To Prepare the Filling

  • While the dough is rising, prepare the ingredients for the recipe. Into a large mixing basin, add all of the ingredients for the filling
  • Knead the mixture thoroughly until it is completely incorporated and appears pale and sticky. Place in the refrigerator until the dough is done
  • Cover with plastic wrap and set aside

To Form

  • Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces and roll out each piece a second time to make a rectangle. Cover the dough with a moist towel that has been tightly pressed and let it aside for 20 minutes to make it easier to handle
  • Make a circle out of the dough by spreading it out with a rolling pin. Roll out the circle’s edges as thinly as possible, but avoid stretching the center too much. In this way, the components will be brought to the center. Your thumb and index finger of your right hand should be used to pinch the dough’s edges together. The index finger should be used to squeeze the dough farther forward and glue it together without altering the position of the right thumb. Make a small indentation in the dough with the thumb of your left hand to prevent the filling from escaping
  • Close the dough by pinching the middle of the dough together. It will be difficult to wrap if there are too many components inside
  • Thus, if you are preparing it for the first time, use less ingredients to make it simpler to wrap

To Steam

  • Each bun should be protected with a little piece of parchment paper. In a steamer, bring water to a boil and arrange the buns apart so that they rise to approximately 1.5 times their original size
  • 15 minutes of steaming on a medium heat setting

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Tomoyo

Hello, my name is Tomoyo and I’m from Japan. I am a huge fan of anime, manga, anime snacks, and, of course, Japanese cuisine. I’m going to offer some of my anime dishes and Japanese recipes. Please keep in touch with me, all of you anime aficionados and Japanese food enthusiasts! よろしくね Cookies are used on our website to provide you with the best relevant experience possible by storing your choices and recognizing you when you return. By clicking “Accept,” you agree to the usage of ALL cookies on this website.

Nikuman – Steamed Pork Buns ( 肉まん ) Recipe

Uncut Recipes (photo courtesy of Uncut Recipes) RECIPE FOR TRADITIONAL JAPANESE FOOD: Nikuman are Japanese steamed hot buns filled with ground pork that are available practically everywhere in the country. Nikuman was initially known in Japan as “chukaman” when it was first launched (Chinese-style steamed bun). Initial sales were restricted to Chinatown specialty shops, but by 1927, they were being sold to Japanese consumers as well. While they were previously only available for purchase at festivals, after the 1990s, convenience stores began to stock them, and today they are one of Japan’s most popular snacks.

The term Nikuman stems from the combination of the meat (Niku) and the cake (Man) (Man from Manjyu).

Manjyu are Japanese sweet cakes that are descended from Chinese dim sum steamed buns. Nikuman, on the other hand, has undergone its own development to suit Japanese preferences over the course of the previous 100 years. Ingredients:

  • Baking Dough: 200g All Purpose Flour100ml Warm WaterBread Dough in Metric Sugar (54 g) 10 gallons of oil 5 g Baking Powder (optional) 4 g of Yeast 200gr of ground pork for the filling 50gr Water Chestnuts (optional) (chopped finely) 2 Shiitake Mushrooms that have been dried (rehydrated and chopped finely) 36 g Soy Sauce (optional) 15 ounces of Sake 14 g Sesame Seed Oil 12 g of granulated sugar 2 Green Onions (optional) (chopped finely) 7 grams of corn starch 6 g Oyster Sauce (optional) 5 g Ginger Root (optional) (grated) salt 1 g Imperial: g Imperial: 7 ounces of bread dough Flour for All Purpose Use 3.5 ounces of warm water 0.35 cup oil0.17 cup baking powder0.14 cup yeast 1.9 cup sugar 0.35 cup oil0.17 cup baking powder0.14 cup yeast 7 ounces of ground pork for the filling Water Chestnuts (1.7 oz) (chopped finely) 2 Shiitake Mushrooms that have been dried (rehydrated and chopped finely) 1.26 ounces soy sauce, 0.52 ounces sake, 0.49 ounces sesame oil, and 0.42 ounces sugar 2 Green Onions (optional) (chopped finely) The following ingredients: 0.24 ounce corn starch0.21 oz oyster sauce 0.17 ounce Ginger Root (optional) (grated) Cups: 0.03oz salt
  • 0.03oz sugar The following ingredients are needed to make bread dough: 1.6 cup all-purpose flour0.36 cup warm water 3 tablespoons Sugar2 teaspoons Oil3 tablespoons Sugar1 teaspoon Oil 1 teaspoon Baking Powder (optional) a teaspoon and a half Yeast 1 cup of ground pork for the filling a trio of water chestnuts (chopped finely) 2 Shiitake Mushrooms that have been dried (rehydrated and chopped finely) 2 teaspoons Soy Sauce (optional) one-and-a-half tablespoons Sake 1 tablespoon of Sesame Oil (optional) Green onions, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 green onions (chopped finely) 1 tablespoon Corn Starch1 teaspoon Oyster Sauce 1 tablespoon Oyster Sauce 1 teaspoon Ginger Root (optional) (grated) 0.25 teaspoon Sodium chloride

Directions for the Bread Dough: For the Bread Dough: 1. In a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, dissolve the yeast in the warm water and leave to stand for 5 minutes, or until bubbles appear. 02 – In a separate mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, and baking powder. 3. Place the dry ingredients and yeast water in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook and begin mixing until the dough comes together. 04 After 1 minute, pour in the oil and knead the dough for 10 minutes, or until it is elastic and smooth, in the stand mixer.

  1. Form the dough into a ball and set it aside in a large mixing dish.
  2. Roll up tightly in cling film and place somewhere warm for 45 minutes, or until it has doubled in size.
  3. 07 – Combine all of the ingredients in a large mixing bowl until a smooth paste is produced.
  4. Once the Dough is double its original size, divide it into eight equal pieces and roll each piece into a ball.
  5. 9.
  6. 10.
  7. Repeat.
  8. 12 – Place the Nikuman laced on parchment paper squares in a heated steamer (space them 5cm/2in apart) and steam cook over medium high heat for about 10-15 minutes, or until the Nikuman is tender.
See also:  How Do You Play Hot Cross Buns On A Recorder

Nikuman Japanese Steamed Pork Buns

You are here: Home/Recipes/Meat/Nikuman Steamed Pork Buns (Japanese Steamed Pork Buns, Nikuman) If you are traveling in Japan during the winter months, there is a good possibility that you may come across street food sellers and convenience stores that serve Nikuman, which are steamed beef buns. Steamed buns, originally known as Chukaman (Chinese-style steamed buns), were brought to Japan in the late 1920s and have since become a winter staple throughout the nation. Indeed, buns are a seasonal meal that can only be found from August/September until April of the following year, depending on the region.

Nikuman are available at most convenience stores and supermarkets.

Nikuman, Japanese Steamed Pork Buns

Nikuman are steamed pork buns that are sold on the streets of Japan during the colder months of the year. It is the white fluffy buns prepared with flour dough and filled with flavorful pork and onions that are steamed on bamboo steamers that are great for quick and simple snacking.

Course Chef’s Appetizers and Side Dishes Asian, Japanese Steamed buns, pork, Japanese street cuisine, snack, and winter meal are some of the keywords to remember. Preparation time: 10 minutes Preparation time: 20 minutes Servings8bunsCalories208kcalCost8

For the dough

  • 2 cups all-purpose white flour (200 grams)
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry yeast
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup warm water

For the filling

  • A third pound of pork, half a medium yellow onion, chopped, 1 1/2 teaspoons bread crumbs, 1 teaspoon soy sauce, 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil, 1/2 teaspoon corn starch
  • Assemble the components
  • In a regular mixing bowl, combine all of the dry ingredients for the dough. While the mixer is running on medium speed, slowly pour in the warm water and oil. To make the dough, mix for about 20 seconds, or until it comes together. Spread out the dough on a floured board and shape it into a ball. Wrap it in plastic and put it somewhere safe
  • Prepare the filling by combining all of the ingredients for the filling in a mixing bowl. Make eight balls out of the filling
  • Set aside. Find a skillet that is large enough to accommodate a bamboo steamer on top of it. Fill the skillet half-full with water and place it on the burner to heat
  • 12 inch squares of parchment paper should be cut off. You will require eight. Eight balls of dough should be formed from the dough. Roll the balls into 4-inch circles, one at a time, starting with the largest. To make it thinner, press it around the rims. This helps to avoid having an excessive amount of dough on the top. Pulling the edges together and pinching them at the top will help you wrap the filling. Set it on a piece of parchment paper and place it in the bamboo steamer to steam for 15 minutes. Place four buns in each tray
  • Turn the heat on the burner to high and bring the water to a boil
  • Remove from the heat. Placing the bamboo steamer on top of the pan and turning the heat down to medium-low. The buns should be steamed for 20 minutes before serving.

Preparing the ingredients: In a regular mixing bowl, combine all of the dry ingredients for the dough. Warm water and oil should be added while the mixer is running on medium speed. To create the dough, mix for approximately 20 seconds. Spread out the dough on a floured surface and shape it into a ball with your fingers. It should be wrapped in plastic and placed somewhere safe; Filling: Combine all of the filling ingredients in a large mixing bowl until well blended. Eight balls of filling should be formed.

  • Pour half a cup of water into a pan and place it on the heat.
  • It is necessary to have 8 of them.
  • Roll the balls into 4-inch circles, one at a time, starting with the smallest.
  • As a result, there isn’t any extra dough on top of the baked goods.
  • Set it on a piece of parchment paper and place it in the bamboo steamer to steam for 10 minutes.
  • Turn on the heat on the stove and bring the water to a boil.
  • Allow 20 minutes of steaming time before serving.

Reader Interactions

These steamed pork buns, also known as ‘nikuman’ in Japanese, are popular Japanese appetizers as well as a popular alternative in Chinese Dim Sum. They are also known as ‘nikuman’ in English. The fluffy white buns that enclose the warm, delicious pork filling that melts in your tongue make them a pleasant comfort dish to eat on a cold night.

Secret ingredient for easy steamed pork buns

If you enjoy these pork buns, this is a simple recipe that eliminates the need to make the dough from scratch, saving you a significant amount of time. Even though this surprising component serves as a substitute for the homemade dough, the flavor of these buns is exactly as real as the Japanesenikumanyou can buy in Japan. Here’s everything you need to know about the secret ingredient: Using a secret ingredient, you can reduce the amount of time it takes to produce dough from scratch!

Mushroom options

Make sure not to leave out the shiitake mushrooms from the recipe. At the United States, they are becoming increasingly frequent in normal grocery shops. If necessary, normal button mushrooms can be used in place of the cremini. Alternatively, have these dried shiitake mushrooms on hand so that you can simply soak them in water and they will be ready to use! To check the current price on Amazon, simply click on the image.

Tools you’ll need

Before you begin cooking, there are a few things I want to make sure you have before you get started. There’s nothing worse than having all of the materials ready and then realizing that you’re missing a crucial tool halfway through the process!

Because these are very basic cooking implements, it is likely that you already have them in your kitchen. However, be certain that you have the following goods on hand:

  • Waxed paper or parchment paper
  • A stainless steel steamer basket
  • A deep 12-inch skillet or an 8-quart Dutch oven – both of which should be equipped with a cover.

How to serve steamed pork buns

Because of the moisture in the dough, these buns may seem dark when they are finished baking. Remove them from the saucepan and allow them to air dry for a few minutes. Serve with a simple, optional dipping sauce made with soy sauce and a little amount of karashi, Japanese spicy mustard, on the side after they have cooled enough to touch (like soy sauce and wasabi forsushi). Before serving, be sure to remove the wax paper from the bottom of the dish. Preparation tip: Make careful to press and seal the dough securely at the top of the dough.

Japanese Steamed Pork Bun Recipe

Nikuman, this is the quickest and most straightforward method for making real Japanese steamed pork buns. Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking Time: 40 minutes Time allotted: 55 minutes Appetizers and Snacks are included in the course fee. CuisineJapanese

Ingredients

  • 1 can (about 16.3 oz) Pillsbury Grands! 1 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • Flaky refrigerated Original biscuits

Filling Ingredients

  • Ground pork, 2 – 3shiitake mushrooms, chopped, 1/2 cup onions, chopped, 5 tablespoons soy sauce, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1/2 teaspoon ginger paste, 1/2 tablespoon Japanese sake, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, and 1 tablespoon potato or corn starch

Dipping Sauce (Optional)

  • Cut the wax/parchment paper into eight (8) squares that are approximately 3 inches by 3 inches in size. Heat the veggie in a small sauce pan over medium heat until it is warm. Sauté the chopped onion and shiitake mushrooms in a little olive oil until the onions are transparent, 3-4 minutes. Filling ingredients (including the sautéed onion and mushrooms) should be combined in a large mixing basin and well mixed together. Make eight biscuits out of the dough. Each should be pressed into a flat 5 to 6-inch circle. Fill the middle of each round with approximately 1 spoonful of the ground pork mixture filling. By going around the biscuit and pulling its edges together, you may make a 2-inch ball by pinching it tightly at the top and rolling it in your hands. Place a wax/parchment square on the bottom (non-seam) side of each ball
  • Bring 1/2 to 1 inch water to a boil in a large pan or Dutch oven. It is important that water does not come into contact with the bottom of filled buns
  • Otherwise, they will get soggy on the bottom. Place the filled buns in the steamer basket with the seam side up and at least 1/2 inch apart from one another. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes until the vegetables are tender. Because a skillet or Dutch oven can only hold 4 buns at a time, repeat the method above, making sure there is enough water at the bottom of the skillet. Because the steam is quite hot and the buns are delicate, use tongs to carefully remove the steam buns from the pan. Remove the waxed paper or parchment paper from the dish before serving or reheating. Optional dipping sauce should be served with the dish.

Dim sum, ground pork, and nikuman are some of the keywords to remember. Save it to your Pinterest board for later!

Steamed Japanese Pork Buns (Nikuman) Recipe

A delightful blend of juicy meat and fresh veggies is contained between soft, fluffy buns known as Nikuman (Japanese Meat Buns) that are steam-cooked. They are delicious as a delightful snack or as a savory accompaniment to a meal. They are the ultimate comfort meal because of their delicious flavor and creamy texture. Thailand is undoubtedly one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world, but Japan does not appear to hold the same allure, at least not for us in the United States. When Jacob and I were arranging our vacation, we figured that stopping in Japan would be a good way to save money on airfare.

  1. And, to be quite honest, I’d never even contemplated visiting Japan before to this journey.
  2. But, in all seriousness.
  3. It wasn’t just the culture that was incredible; the cuisine was also very wonderful, the people were really nice, and the scenery was breathtaking.
  4. As a result, while there were so many wonderful things to see and do in Japan, I was naturally thrilled to sample all of the different foods.
  5. Ugh, this is really wonderful.
  6. While we were traveling across Japan, I made it a point to look for all of the different cuisines that we wanted to sample while we were there.
  7. This eatery was well-known for its meat buns (also known as Nikuman), which were steamed buns fashioned from a flour dough and filled with ground beef or chicken.
  8. The fact that something so basic can be so pleasant is very remarkable.
  9. While they aren’t precisely the same as authentic Japanese steamed pork buns, they are quite near in flavor and texture.

Although I realize that preparing things from scratch may seem daunting, I was first intimidated by the prospect of doing so. However, I believe you will be pleasantly delighted to discover that it is far less difficult than you anticipate.

Are pork buns Chinese or Japanese?

Nikuman is the Japanese term for Chinese baozi, which means “little pig.” Steamed buns, which are prepared from wheat dough and filled with cooked pork or beef, are genuinely eaten in many nations throughout South East Asia, in addition to Japan and China, and are particularly popular in Thailand.

How do you cook pork buns without a steamer?

Is there no steamer? It’s not an issue! This video provides an excellent explanation on how to cook pork buns without the use of a steamer.

How long do pork buns last in the fridge?

The buns may be kept in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 3-4 days or in the freezer for 4-6 weeks after they have been cooked. Allowing the buns to come to room temperature before reheating them from frozen or refrigerated is recommended. Steam the buns for 5-7 minutes, or until they are steaming hot. In an airtight container, cooked buns will keep for 3 to 4 days in the refrigerator or 4 to 6 weeks in the freezer if stored in the proper conditions. To reheat, let the buns to defrost and come to room temperature if they were frozen; if they were refrigerated, allow them to come to room temperature.

You’ll also love these other Japanese recipes:

  • Japanese Ramen with Chicken, Japanese Milk Bread, Pork Tonkatsu, and Fluffy Japanese Pancakes are some of the dishes on the menu.

Please let me know what you think of this dish if you try it. Would appreciate it if you could leave a star rating and a remark in the section below. Also, don’t forget to follow me on Instragram, Pinterest, and Facebook! A delightful blend of juicy meat and fresh veggies is contained between soft, fluffy buns known as Nikuman (Japanese Meat Buns) that are steam-cooked. They are delicious as a delightful snack or as a savory accompaniment to a meal. They are the ultimate comfort meal because of their delicious flavor and creamy texture.

Cuisine:Japanese Keywords: beef, pork, and lamb Servings:6servingsDough

  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2/3 cup water
  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

Filling made of meat

  • 1/2 pound ground beef or pork cooked
  • 1 1/2 cups finely chopped cabbage
  • 4 green onions chopped
  • 1/2 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1/8 tsp dried ginger
  • Dash of pepper
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  1. Begin by allowing your yeast to proof (unless you are using instant yeast). Warm water should be used to dissolve the yeast and sugar. Allow the mixture to rest for 5 to 10 minutes, or until it seems frothy. Combine the flour, baking powder, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Using a stand mixer or by hand, knead the dough for 5 minutes after adding the olive oil. At this time, the dough should be somewhat sticky to the touch. Cover the dish with a moist cloth and allow it to rise until it has doubled in size
  2. In a separate dish, mix all of the ingredients for the meat filling. Place the dough in the refrigerator until it is ready to use. Once the dough has doubled in size, divide it into six equal pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and allow it to rise for another 10 minutes before using. Fill the meat filling into each ball once it has been rolled out with a rolling pin. Using your fingers, pinch together the edges of the bun to close it, and then gently twist it in the centre. Place each bun on a tiny sheet of parchment paper or a cupcake liner to prevent them from sticking together. Allow for a 20-minute rising time for the buns. Steam the buns for 20 minutes, or until they are completely done.

The following is an adaptation ofMamaloli. You may also use four equal-sized balls of aluminum foil layered in a big pot if you don’t have a steamer. Insert an aluminum sheet into the pot and set a plate on top of it. Add a couple of inches of water and stir. Place your buns on a platter and cover with a lid to keep them warm. Allow the buns to boil for 20 minutes on a medium heat.

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I am a huge foodie and traveler who enjoys discovering new places. On most days, you can find me in the kitchen concocting culinary creations or traveling to some exotic location around the world. Have you tried a new recipe or visited a breathtaking location? On Instagram and Twitter, use the hashtags @wanderzestblog orwanderzestblog. I’m looking forward to seeing your exciting travels!

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