How To Make Manapua Buns

Hawaiian Style Manapua Buns

  • SERVINGS:8 With a single click of a button on the recipe card, you may make changes! Go directly to the recipe. Michael was born and raised on the Hawaiian island of Oahu. He has been raving about manapua, also known as steamed pork buns, since we first met. I had never experienced Hawaiian Style Manapua Buns until meeting Michael on one of my previous travels to Hawaii. It didn’t sound especially appetizing: steamed bread dough with a glob of bright red meat in the center, to be precise. I brought Michael on a trip to Oahu a few years ago, and he ate manapua in restaurants and from the food cases in convenience stores. Manapua is accessible in a variety of forms throughout the islands, from street sellers to upscale restaurants. I tried one, but it did not impress me in the least. Food blogging introduces us to foods that we would not have otherwise encountered. Non-traditional meals, and even foods that were formerly despised, make their way into our plates when they are presented in a novel way or caught in a photograph that looks good enough to eat. This is exactly what occurred between me and Manapua. My eyes were drawn to an exquisite photograph of shining white, steamed buns, each of which had just a smidgeon of that vivid red meat in its middle. As I was putting together these cookies for Michael, I realized that I had fallen in love with them myself. I conducted a lot of web research before settling on the dough recipe and heating process that I would utilize for this project. The Chinese term for these buns is bao, but the Hawaiians refer to them as manapua (manapua buns). In the Manapua dough, there are minor distinctions such as the use of sesame oil and the use of both yeast and baking powder, which distinguishes it from other doughs. Generally speaking, bao are smaller when the seam side is up, but manapua are spherical when the seam side is on the bottom. These buns may be filled with a variety of meats, veggies, and tofu, but the one Michael like and which is the most popular in Hawaii is the char siu pork bun. “Char siu” refers to meat that has been marinated in char siu seasoning before being grilled. The char sui spice can be made from home or purchased in a pouch or jar from a grocery shop or Asian market. This jarring rendition is one of my favorites. (Update: I’ve added a recipe for homemade char Sui BBQ sauce in this post!) Alternatively, if you are short on time, you may pick up char suiBBQ pork from your favorite Chinese restaurant whether you are making it from scratch or if you are using a canned sauce. Char sui BBQ sauce is applied to the pig before it is roasted, either in an oven or over an open fire. I used pork loin that had been grilled on my indoor barbecue. The cooked pork is coarsely chopped then spices, onions, and wine are added to produce the filling. It should have the appearance like this, with little pieces of pork, onions, a rich sauce, and a brilliant red hue to complement it. The dough may either be produced by hand or with a stand mixer, depending on your preference. The initial rise of the dough takes around one hour. The dough is split into 16 pieces that are equal in size. Keep the dough pieces covered with plastic wrap when filling them one at a time to prevent them from drying out throughout the process. Place the dough pieces on a floured board and press them together. Form them into 5″ rounds with a tiny rolling pin, making the center a little thicker than the rest. You may even shape them by hand if you choose. Using a tablespoon of the filling, make a well in the middle. Pinching the corners of the dough together will help to seal it. Traditionally, the seam side of a small piece of parchment paper is placed on a little piece of manapua. Once all of the buns have been filled, cover them loosely with plastic wrap and set them aside for 30 to 45 minutes to rise. Placing the buns on the parchment paper in a steamer insert is a good idea. They will inflate up when cooked, so don’t overcrowd them. I use an electric steamer to do this. It’s a perfect fit! 15 minutes of steaming time is required for the buns. Raise the cover of the pot to enable the steam to escape. Leave them in the steamer in this manner for 5 minutes total. The water that collects on the inside of the lid should drain away without getting on the buns themselves. To remove the steamed buns from the steamer, use tongs to lift them out. They should have a similar appearance! Here are a few that I steamed with the seam side facing upwards: These have a more appealing appearance to me. “Don’t tell Michael,” says the narrator. Aside from that, he claims that they are the greatest manapua he has ever tasted. He claimed that the best part about the pork was the way it was trimmed to eliminate all of the fat and other things that you wouldn’t want to bite into when eating it. We will most definitely be eating them again in the future. Michael claims that he does it at least once a month. That is something I am capable of! Here is my recipe, which is an adaption of a plethora of others found on the internet: Servings8Calories195kcal
  • For the dough, combine 1 12 teaspoons instant dry yeast, 34 cup warm water, 2 tablespoons canola oil, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder, and a scant 3 cups flour. To make the filling, combine 2 cups diced barbecue pork with 3 tablespoons finely chopped white onion, 1 teaspoon sesame oil, 2 teaspoons sugar, 1 teaspoon Chinese cooking wine, 1 teaspoon oyster sauce, 1 teaspoon dark soy sauce, 1 teaspoon corn starch with 2 teaspoons water, and 3-4 drops red food coloring (optional).
  • To create the dough with a stand mixer, follow these steps: To make the yeast, place it in a small dish with the water and let it aside for 1 minute to soften. Whisk in the oil until it is well incorporated and the yeast has been dissolved. Set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the sugar, baking powder, and flour until well combined. Mix on a low speed with the dough hook until everything is well combined. Pour in the yeast, water, and oil mixture. Allow the dough to be kneaded in the mixer on medium speed until it forms a large ball and the sides of the bowl are completely clean. However, if this does not occur, add warm water, 1 TBS at a time, until the dough forms a large ball and is mostly cleaned off of the bowl’s edges. However, it should not stick to your finger and should have a medium-soft and sticky texture. In the event that you do not have access to a stand mixer, you can mix and knead the dough by hand. In order to reach the appropriate texture, it will take around five minutes of kneading. Lightly grease a large glass mixing bowl and transfer the dough into it. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside in a warm, draft-free area to rise until nearly doubled in volume. Although it should only take approximately an hour, the exact time will vary depending on the temperature of the room. To prepare the fillings: While the dough is proving, prepare the ingredients for the fillings by combining them in a small bowl. 3 tablespoons cooking oil should be added to a frying pan. Cook the onions until they are transparent. Stir in the barbecued pork until everything is nicely combined. Combine the cooking wine, sesame oil, sugar, oyster sauce, and soy sauce in a large mixing bowl. Continue to stir-fry for another 2 minutes. Add one-half of the cornstarch/water solution, stirring continually, until the solution becomes translucent. If necessary, increase the amount of thickener used. If desired, tint the sauce with red food coloring. The traditional filling is a vibrant red in appearance. After you have completed proving the dough, it is time to build the manapua. Set the filling aside for subsequent assembling. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board and cut it into 16 equal pieces with a sharp knife. Form the dough into five-inch circles using your hands or a small rolling pin, and set aside. Place a spoonful of the filling in the center of each bread to make a sandwich. Make a ring out of the dough and bring the edges together/span. Prepare a steamer by filling it with 2 inches of water. Depending on your preference, you can use an electric steamer or a stovetop steamer. Place the packed dough in a steamer and steam the buns for approximately 12-15 minutes on a high heat setting. Close the steamer and open the lid just a smidgeon to let the steam to escape before turning it back on. Allow for a 5-minute cooling period before taking the buns from the steamer. It is best if served warm.

Making the dough with a stand mixer requires the following ingredients: Place the yeast in a small basin, add the water, and let aside for 1 minute to soften the yeast before continuing. Combine the oil and yeast in a separate bowl, whisking constantly. Set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine the sugar, baking powder, and flour. Mix on a low speed, with the dough hook, to blend the ingredients. Toss in the yeast mixture, water, and oil. On medium, knead the dough until it forms a huge ball and the edges of the basin are no longer visible (about 10 minutes).

  1. However, it should not adhere to your finger and should have a medium-soft and sticky texture.
  2. In order to reach the appropriate texture, it will need around five minutes of kneading; A big glass bowl should be lightly oiled before to placing the dough in the basin.
  3. This will take around one hour, although the exact time will depend on the temperature of the room.
  4. Prepare the ingredients for the fillings while the dough is rising.
  5. Cook the onions until transparent, about 5 minutes or so.
  6. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the cooking wine, sesame oil, sugar, and oyster sauce.
  7. 12 of the cornstarch/water solution should be added at a time while stirring continually until the solution becomes clear.

It is optional to tint the sauce with red food coloring.

After you have completed proving your dough, it is time to build your manapua.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board and cut it into 16 equal pieces with a pastry cutter.

In the middle of each bun, place a spoonful of the filling.

Steamers are available in two varieties: electric and stovetop.

Close the steamer and open the lid just a smidgeon to let the steam to escape before turning it back on again.

When served hot, the flavor is enhanced.

Related Posts

Manapua, Baozi, or Steamed Bun – whatever you choose to call them, they are really tasty! Chicken mushroom, chicken curry, teriyaki chicken or beef, shoyu chicken, purple yam (ube), pork hash (bola bola), and lup choung are some of the fillings available in commercial versions of the dish. Among the options available from certain Hawaiian manapua vendors are pizza-filled manapua, turkey melts, ham and cheese omelets, teriyaki burgers, and spicy sausage.

Consider all of the many tastes you might stuff into your manapua. Have a good time and enjoy yourself! Please keep in mind that the times do not include the time required for the dough to rise.

  • 3tablespoonslukewarmwater
  • 11 2tablespoonscooking oil or 1 1/2tablespoonshortening
  • 1 4cupsugar, with a shopping list
  • 1 2tablespoonsesame oil
  • 1 4cupsugar, plus a shopping list
Filling

  • Allow 3 tablespoons of lukewarm water to rest with the yeast until the yeast softens, about 5 minutes. Add the oil or shortening, sugar, and salt to the remaining water and whisk until the sugar and salt are melted or dissolved. Cool. Pour in the yeast mixture
  • Place the flour in a large mixing basin or the bowl of a heavy-duty mixer and gradually add the liquid until the mixture is smooth. Combine until the flour has absorbed the liquid and is beginning to form a ball
  • Continue to add the remaining liquid until you have a very thick dough. To begin, kneading the dough in a large mixing basin. Knead the dough until it is a smooth ball that is beginning to show evidence of long strands on the exterior, which indicates that the gluten has fully grown
  • Remove the dough from the bowl and thoroughly rinse the bowl. Pour sesame oil into a mixing bowl, return the dough to the bowl, and flip it around until it is completely covered with the oil
  • Wrap the dish with plastic wrap. In a warm environment, let the dough to rise until it has about doubled in volume (approximately an hour). Place the dough in the refrigerator and let it to rise until doubled in volume (3-6 hours). pound it down once again and allow it to rise once more (3 hours)
  • While the dough is rising, you may start working on the filling. Stir the cornstarch, hoisin sauce, dry sherry, oyster sauce, ketchup, soy sauce, and brown sugar into the 1 cup water in a saute pan until the cornstarch is completely dissolved. Bring to a boil, then decrease heat to low and continue to cook for 1 minute, stirring frequently. Cook for 5 minutes after adding the char siu. Remove from heat and let aside to cool fully. Refrigerate until 1 hour before you’re ready to pack the manapua, tightly covered. Allow for the return of the product to room temperature before usage. Preparation: Cut 12 (3-inch) squares of waxed paper and spray one side with a very light application of nonstick cooking spray when you’re ready to cook
  • Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces when it has been punched down. Each should be rolled into a ball. Roll out the dough as thinly as possible, aiming to maintain the borders a little thinner than the middle
  • Place the circle of dough in the palm of your hand and press down on it with your fingers. Place a couple of teaspoons of filling in the center of the dough, cupping the dough around it. Pinch the sides of the dough together with the thumb and index finger of the opposite hand, as if you were constructing a fluted border for a pie crust. Make a pincer motion with your folds, twisting them as you go. Prepare a piece of oiled waxed paper and place it on top of the finished manapua. Allow it to puff out into a globe with a tight shell
  • Then remove it. Preheat a steamer with lots of water or a preheated oven to 350 degrees F. If using a steamer, place manapua on their papers about 1 to 2 inches apart in the steamer. If using an oven, preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Steam vigorously for 15 minutes under a tight-fitting lid. Remove the steamer from the heat and allow it to cool for 5 minutes before opening. Place a folded tea towel across the top of the steamer and secure it in place with the lid if using a metal steamer. As a result, steam will not drip onto the manapua when it is being steamed
  • If you’re baking the manapua, arrange them on a baking sheet approximately 1-2 inches apart, with their papers facing up. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, brushing the tops of the buns with a little vegetable oil. Remove the pan from the oven and set it aside for 1 minute. Manapua is best served hot, although it may also be frozen. It is possible to reheat frozen bau by covering it in a paper towel and microwaving it for one minute.

RECIPE MADE WITH LOVE BY

“Manapua, Baozi, or Steamed Bun – whatever you want to call them, they are really excellent! Chicken mushroom, chicken curry, teriyaki chicken or beef, shoyu chicken, purple yam (ube), pork hash (bola bola), and lup choung are some of the fillings available in commercial versions of the dish. Among the options available from certain Hawaiian manapua vendors are pizza-filled manapua, turkey melts, ham and cheese omelets, teriyaki burgers, and spicy sausage. Consider all of the many tastes you might stuff into your manapua.

See also:  Why Do Hotdogs Come In Packages Of 10 And Buns In 8

Please keep in mind that the times do not include proofing time for the dough.”

recipes

Do you have a hankering for dim sum? We’ve taken care of everything! Hawaii’s version of char siu bao is made out of sweet and sour BBQ pork that’s wrapped in fluffy, steamed bao buns. These are known as manapuas in Hawaii. for5manapuas

  • 14 cups all-purpose flour (155g), plus additional flour for dusting 12 cup warm water (120mL)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon quick yeast
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 120 g char siu (Chinese barbecue pork)
  • 14 g char siu sauce (55 g)
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce, 1 tablespoon oyster sauce, 1 tablespoon sugar, 2 tbsp water
  1. Make the bao dough by combining the flour, sugar, yeast, vegetable oil, and 13 cup warm water in a medium-sized mixing basin and stirring until well combined. Pour in the remaining 2 tablespoons of water in a slow, steady stream, mixing continually. In a large mixing basin, knead the dough until it is smooth and thoroughly incorporated. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough to rise for approximately 1 hour, or until it has doubled in volume. Make the char siu filling by following these steps: Chop the char sui into 12-inch pieces and dice the onion
  2. Set aside. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the char siu sauce, soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sugar
  3. Set aside. In a medium nonstick pan, sauté the onion until translucent, about 1 minute, until it is soft and transparent. Combine the chopped char siu, sauce, and water in a large mixing bowl. Stir everything together, then cook for 2 minutes, or until the sauce thickens. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the filling ingredients and chill for approximately 1 hour or until cold. After the dough has risen, punch it down and knead it until it has returned to its original size. Divide the dough into five 48-gram balls and roll them out on a lightly floured board. Each section should be flattened and rolled out, with the centre being thick and the edges being thin, as desired. Holding a dough round in the palm of your hand, place 36 grams of the char siu filling in the center of the dough round. While turning the bao in your palm, use your other hand to squeeze the corners of the dough together, up and over the filling. Place each bao on a tiny sheet of parchment paper to keep them from sticking together. Before steaming, place the dough in a steamer basket, cover it, and allow it to rise for approximately 15 minutes, or until it is somewhat puffy. To begin, bring water to a boil in a steamer or double boiler, filling the bottom half-way. Add the bao to the steamer basket and cover with a lid. Steam for 15 minutes, then turn off the heat and allow the bao to rest for 5 minutes before serving. Enjoy

For5manapuas

  • 14 cups all-purpose flour (155g), plus additional flour for dusting 12 cup warm water (120mL)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon quick yeast
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • One and a quarter cups all-purpose flour (155g), plus more flour for dusting Sugar
  • Instant yeast
  • Vegetable oil
  • 12 cup warm water (120mL)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  1. Make the bao dough by combining the flour, sugar, yeast, vegetable oil, and 13 cup warm water in a medium-sized mixing basin and stirring until well combined. Pour in the remaining 2 tablespoons of water in a slow, steady stream, mixing continually. In a large mixing basin, knead the dough until it is smooth and thoroughly incorporated. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough to rise for approximately 1 hour, or until it has doubled in volume. Make the char siu filling by following these steps: Chop the char sui into 12-inch pieces and dice the onion
  2. Set aside. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the char siu sauce, soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sugar
  3. Set aside. In a medium nonstick pan, sauté the onion until translucent, about 1 minute, until it is soft and transparent. Combine the chopped char siu, sauce, and water in a large mixing bowl. Stir everything together, then cook for 2 minutes, or until the sauce thickens. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the filling ingredients and chill for approximately 1 hour or until cold. After the dough has risen, punch it down and knead it until it has returned to its original size. Divide the dough into five 48-gram balls and roll them out on a lightly floured board. Each section should be flattened and rolled out, with the centre being thick and the edges being thin, as desired. Holding a dough round in the palm of your hand, place 36 grams of the char siu filling in the center of the dough round. While turning the bao in your palm, use your other hand to squeeze the corners of the dough together, up and over the filling. Place each bao on a tiny sheet of parchment paper to keep them from sticking together. Before steaming, place the dough in a steamer basket, cover it, and allow it to rise for approximately 15 minutes, or until it is somewhat puffy. To begin, bring water to a boil in a steamer or double boiler, filling the bottom half-way. Add the bao to the steamer basket and cover with a lid. Steam for 15 minutes, then turn off the heat and allow the bao to rest for 5 minutes before serving. Enjoy

manapua (barbecue pork buns!) + maui! — molly yeh

Using a medium-sized mixing basin, whisk together the flour and sugar until well combined, then add in the yeast and vegetable oil until well incorporated. Pour in the remaining 2 tablespoons of water in a slow, steady stream while continually mixing. To make the dough smooth and well mixed, knead it in the basin until it is smooth and well blended. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set aside for about 1 hour, or until the dough has doubled in size. Filling for Char Siew: Prepare the char Siew by: Chop the char sui into 12-inch pieces after dicing the onion.

  1. In a medium nonstick skillet, cook the onion until transparent, about 1 minute, until it is soft.
  2. Allow 2 minutes for the sauce to thicken after it has been stirred.
  3. Distribute the dough into 5 48-gram balls on a lightly floured worktop.
  4. Take a dough round and place 36 grams of the char siu filling in the center of it in the palm of your hand.
  5. Place each bao on a tiny sheet of parchment paper and repeat the process with the other bao.
  6. Using a steamer or double boiler, fill the bottom with water and bring it to a boil.
  7. Steam for 15 minutes, then turn off the heat and allow the bao to rest for 5 minutes in the steamer before serving.

Manapua – Hawaii Giant Char Siu Bao or Pork Filled Steamed Buns

Just a few weeks ago, I shared a recipe for forchar siu, which is a popular method of preparing Chinese barbecue pork. However, while char siu is excellent eaten on its own, one of our favorite ways to enjoy it is in a manapua, which is a traditional Hawaiian snack dish.

For those of you who have ever eaten at a dim sum restaurant and experienced the char siu bao, a manapua is an even larger version of this delicate sweet bun stuffed with char siu.

Manapua History

The Chinese immigrants who came to work in the sugar cane fields were the ones who brought char siu bao to Hawaii for the first time. They would sell these pork-filled buns in various districts, and it quickly became a popular snack on the island, earning the name manapua. It is the abbreviated form of the Hawaiian phrase “mea ono puaa,” which means “cake or pastry” and “pua’a,” which means pork or pig in English. The current large-sized manapua found in Hawaii is ascribed to a woman called Bat Moi Kam Mau, who lived in the 18th century.

Modern Manapua

Currently, you can get manapuas that are filled with a number of different contents such as curry, boiled eggs, chicken, and a range of other tasty treats. The possibilities for stuffing a manapua are only limited by your imagination, and you may stuff it with everything you would normally enjoy in a sweet bun. Making manapua is a very simple activity, but it is a delicious delicacy that is well worth the effort to complete. To far, I’ve experimented with a few different steamed bun recipes, and the recipe below is my favorite since it provides a wonderful smooth and shiny outer skin that is also of a decent texture.

Manapua Dough

1 cup of lukewarm water should include one package (or 2 1/4 tsp) of yeast in it. Add one cup of flour to the yeast/water mixture and cover with a moist cloth to prevent the yeast from growing. Allow this to settle for one hour or until bubbles begin to form. In a saucepan of boiling water, dissolve the sugar and vegetable oil. Allow this water to cool until it is lukewarm before adding it to the flour/yeast mix. Add the rest of the flour and knead for another 10 minutes. 2 tablespoons sesame oil should be placed in a large mixing basin, and the dough should be rolled in the bowl to gently coat it with sesame oil.

When the dough is finished, divide it in half.

Cut the mixture into 8-9 pieces and roll them into balls.

Manapua Filling

Form dough balls into circles that are 4 inches in diameter. More dough should be left in the middle, and you should use your fingers to press the dough out along the borders. * In order for the meat mixture to not pop through the dough when cooking, you want extra dough in the centre. * In the middle of the dough, place a heaping spoonful of the char siu mix and press down. Pulling up the borders of the dough around the filling should begin immediately (my 10yr. old daughter is my helper here).

Lightly massage the top and sides of the bun with your fingertips after dipping them in sesame seed oil.

In a warm environment, allow the dough to rise for another 30 – 45 minutes.

Make sure there is a space of around 1- 2 inches between buns.

Remove from the oven and place on a cooling rack. *Serve while still heated. Instead of a bamboo steamer, you may use a rice cooker or any other sort of cooking appliance that has a steamer attachment. Manapua is a delectable treat. What would you put in your manapua to make it more palatable?

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cup char siu
  • 1 -2 tablespoons hot water
  • 2 tablespoons hoisin
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 1/2 – 2 tablespoons green onions

Manapua Dough

  • 1/2 cup boiling water
  • 1 packet yeast or 2 1/4 teaspoon yeast (do not use quick rise)
  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 1 cup + 3 1/2 cup flour (total 4 1/2 cups)
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 T. vegetable oil
  • 2 tsp sesame oil (for bowl) + 1/2 tablespoon
  • 2″ x 2″ square cut parchment paper for bottom of manapua dough
  • 2″ x 2″ square cut parchment paper for top of manapua dough
  • 2″ x

Instructions

  1. Toss the chopped char siu with the hoisin sauce, oyster sauce, and green onions
  2. Set aside. Sugar should dissolve in 1-2 tablespoons of boiling water. Incorporate into the char siu filling mixture
  3. You may also adjust the flavor by adding extra hoisin or oyster sauce to your liking.

Manapua Dough

  1. 1 cup of flour is added once the yeast has been dissolved in lukewarm water. Cover the area with a cloth. Allow for 1 hour of rising time, or until bubbles develop. 1/2 cup hot water is used to dissolve the sugar and vegetable oil. Allow to cool to lukewarm. Pour the liquid into the yeast mixture and stir in the remaining 3 1/2 cups flour until combined. Using a lightly floured board, knead the dough until it is smooth (10 minutes). Place the dough in an extra large mixing basin and cover with 2 tablespoons sesame seed oil. Roll the dough around in the bowl a few times to gently coat it with the sesame oil. Cover with a moist towel and keep it in a warm area until it is ready to use. 2 hours later, let the dough rise until it has doubled in size. Divide the mixture into two equal halves. Remove the first part of dough and knead it for 2 minutes. Repeat the process with the second. Roll each into a 14-16-inch-long roll and cut into 8-9 pieces
  2. Shape each cut piece into a spherical ball. Repeat with the remaining rolls. Pinch the dough together into 4 inch circles, leaving extra dough in the middle and using your fingertips to press it out from your fingers to form the edges. Fill each dough circle with a heaping spoonful of the char siu mixture, which should be placed in the centre. Pinch together the sides of the circle to enclose the filling
  3. Place each bun on a sheet of 2′′ by 2′′ parchment paper to keep them from sticking together. Lightly massage the tops and sides of the buns with your fingertips after dipping them into the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of sesame oil. These should be placed on a sheet and covered with a moist cloth. Place the buns in a warm location and let them to rise for around 30 – 45 minutes
  4. Lay the buns in a steamer and steam for 10-12 minutes. Remove the buns from the steamer and place them on a cooling rack to cool. Serve when still heated. If you choose to store the buns, let them to cool fully before placing them in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Keep it for up to three days
  5. Heat in the microwave for up to 1 minute, or until well warmed through, after covering with a moist paper towel. If you’re freezing the buns, place them in a plastic bag to keep them fresh. Re-steam for a further ten minutes.

MANAPUA, take a bao!

ManapuaSweet, steamed barbecue-pork-filled bunClick on photo to enlarge

Thousands of Cantonese people emigrated from China to Hawaii in the nineteenth century to work on sugarcane fields, bringing with them their culinary traditions. One of these meals was cha siu bao, which is a sweet, steamed barbecue pork bun packed with barbecue pork (pork-filled bun). This exquisite bun quickly became a favorite among islanders, earning it the Hawaiian moniker of mea’ono-pua’a (mea’ono-pua’a means “delectable bun”) “For example, “mea’ono” is used for cake or pastry, while “pua’a” is used for pork.

  • I have to admit that it is one of my favorite types of snack foods to consume.
  • On Oahu, they may be found at a variety of establishments ranging from dim sum restaurants to Chinese bakeries to food trucks.
  • We are not so fortunate on Moloka’i, but we can obtain frozen manapua in packs of six from a Filipino bakery in Honolulu known as Golden Coin Food, which we can purchase at our local grocery shops on the island (see photo above).
  • Alternatively, you may just take a bun out of the frozen container and microwave it for 1 minute on high; there is no need to thaw or cover the bun before cooking it this way.
  • This quick snack or lunch option is not only delicious on its own, but it can also be served alongside other Chinese cuisines.
  • Manapua For those of you who are interested in preparing these delicious steamed buns at home, I have included a recipe; however, I must warn you that they are time-consuming to prepare.

1 teaspoon sesame oil (optional) 3 tablespoons green onions, finely chopped 2 and a half teaspoons of sugar 4 tablespoons soy sauce (optional) a quarter teaspoon of salt and two tablespoons of flour 2 tablespoons cornstarch (optional) a quarter cup of water 1-2 drops red food coloring (optional) (optional) The following are the ingredients for char siu dough: 3 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, or a combination of all-purpose and cake flour is recommended.

  1. 1 tablespoon vegetable shortening a quarter cup of sugar dry active yeast (one package) 1 cup hot water (optional) Filling out the form is as follows: Make a char siu with dice.
  2. Combine the onions, sugar, soy sauce, and salt in a large mixing bowl.
  3. Add to the char siu and mix well.
  4. The following is the dough preparation procedure: In a large mixing bowl, combine three cups of the flour.
  5. Two tablespoons of the sugar should be added at this point.
  6. Stir until the yeast is completely dissolved.
  7. Combination of the flour mixture, the yeast mixture, and the remaining two-thirds cup water 5.
See also:  How To Do Princess Leia Buns

In a greased mixing bowl, place the dough and cover it with plastic wrap, allowing it to rise until doubled in size, approximately one hour at room temperature Divide the mixture into 18 equal portions.

Place approximately 1 tablespoon of filling in the center of the dough.

Seams should be pinched and sealed.

Allow for 20-30 minutes of resting time.

This recipe makes 18 buns.

Cooking Char Siu is a Cantonese specialty in which skewers of pork meat are marinated in a honey and hoisin sauce and then baked in the oven until charred and sticky sweet, the result is a savory and sticky sweet masterpiece.

Ingredients: unsliced pork belly with skin removed (1 pound pork belly) 2 tablespoons Shaoxing Chinese cooking wine (optional) 2 tablespoons dark soy sauce, or regular soy sauce can be used in place of dark soy sauce.

Marinate the pork belly for 2 to 3 hours in the refrigerator, rubbing the marinade mixture into the pork belly.

Removing excess marinade from the pork belly (but be careful not to remove it all at once!) and put it in a roasting pan to cook.

Pork belly should be roasted for 40 to 45 minutes, with the pork belly being turned halfway through and brushed with honey on the other side.

Remove the pork from the oven and set it aside for 5 to 10 minutes to cool down.

Make a pile of the slices on a serving plate and serve them plain as part of a multi-course meal, or with rice or noodles and garnished with green onions sliced thinly.

In order to use the char siu for manapua, the meat should be diced to 1/4 inch thick “a number of pieces This recipe serves 4 to 6 people.

BAKED CHAR SIU BAO OR MANAPUA

By Jo Anne Sugimoto, a resident of Kaneohe, Hawaii Having a char siu or seasoned red pork bun in my mouth brings back so many wonderful memories of my gramma and grampa, my mother and father, my childhood and growing up years, having my own children and now having my grandkids to my thoughts and fills me with joy. It has weathered the test of time, and even after several generations, it remains a strong component in my family’s diet. However, no one in my family had ever considered attempting the monumental challenge of inventing and manufacturing it at home until today.

  1. I couldn’t do it since it was too time-consuming and too much labor.
  2. In order to capture the essence of chinese “char siu bao,” it was necessary to create a certain “taste” on your tongue.
  3. It is the white manapua.
  4. This is also a request for someone who is just “homesick” for meals from their hometown.
  5. Enjoy yourselves, LY!

Easy SPAM® Manapua

Skip to the main content Suggestions for How to Serve In Hawaii, the filled-bun dessert known as Manapua is spelt mea’ono-pua’a, which translates as “pork cake.” In other words, it’s a pork cake. Fortunately, making this delectable delicacy is a lot less difficult than spelling it correctly. Servings16 Preparation time: 10 minutes Preparation time: 20 minutes Time allotted: 30 minutes Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon oil
  • 1 (12-ounce) canSPAM ®Less Sodium, diced
  • 1/2 cup diced onion
  • 5 tablespoons oyster sauce
  • 3 tablespoons Chinese cooking wine
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/2 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon water
  • 1/2 tablespoon cornstarch mixed with 1 tablespoon thawed frozen dinner rolls (from a 3-pound bag)
  • 16 frozen dinner rolls

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes, or until gently browned, after adding SPAM ®Less Sodium. Cook for 2 minutes after adding the onions. Combine the oyster sauce, wine, soy sauce, sesame oil, and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Mix in the cornstarch mixture well. Cook for another 1 to 2 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened. Remove from skillet and let aside to cool. Form each dough ball into a flat circular disc with your hands. Fill approximately 1 spoonful of filling into each piece of dough. Pinch the ends of the dough together to seal it. Placing the parchment squares in a steamer basket 1/2 inch apart and steaming for 12 to 15 minutes over high heat
  2. Removing and serving.

Try These Flavors for a Novel Approach Try These Flavors for a Novel Approach View a larger selection of items

Hawaii: Classic Manapua (Steamed Buns Hawaiian Style)

The inspiration for this recipe came from Genius Kitchen. Please keep in mind that the preparation time is uncertain. 1 1/4 ounce) box dry yeast (for a total of 1 1/4 ounce) 12 tablespoons of cooking oil or 12 tablespoons of shortening (optional) 14 cup sugar, as well as a grocery list 12 tablespoons sesame oil (optional) 1 pound chinese barbecue pork shoulder, diced (Char Siu) Directions Pour 3 tablespoons of lukewarm water over the yeast and leave it rest until the yeast softens (about 5 minutes).

  1. Cool.
  2. 3.Place the flour in a large mixing basin or the bowl of a heavy-duty mixer and gradually add the liquid until the flour is moistened.
  3. 4.Add the remaining liquid until a very thick dough is formed.
  4. Knead the dough until it is a smooth ball that is beginning to show evidence of long strands on the exterior, which indicates that the gluten has fully grown.
  5. Pour sesame oil into a mixing bowl, return the dough to the bowl, and flip it around until it is completely covered with the oil.
  6. Allow the dough to rise until it has doubled in size (about an hour in a warm room).
  7. Allow it to rise again once it has been knocked down (3 hours).

Stir the cornstarch, hoisin sauce, dry sherry, oyster sauce, ketchup, soy sauce, and brown sugar into the 1 cup water in a saute pan until the cornstarch is completely dissolved.

Cook for 5 minutes after adding the char siu.

Refrigerate until 1 hour before you’re ready to pack the manapua, tightly covered.

To prepare the dish, cut 12 (3-inch) pieces of waxed paper and spray one side with a very little layer of nonstick cooking spray before putting it in the oven.

Each should be rolled into a ball.

13.Cover your palm with the circle of dough that you just formed.

14.Pinch the sides of the dough together with the thumb and index finger of the other hand, as if you were constructing a fluted border for a pie crust.

15.Place the finished manapua on a square of oiled waxed paper to dry completely.

Prepare a steamer with lots of water, or prepare an oven to 350 degrees F.

When steaming, place manapua on their papers, about 1 to 2 inches apart, in the steamer’s bottom compartment.

Remove the steamer from the heat and allow it to cool for 5 minutes before opening.

During the steaming process, this will prevent steam from falling onto the manapua.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, brushing the tops of the buns with a little vegetable oil.

Remove the pan from the oven and set it aside for 1 minute. Serve when still heated. 19.Manapua is capable of being frozen. It is possible to reheat previously frozen bau by wrapping it in a paper towel and placing it in the microwave for 1 minute.

Recipes we also love.

This recipe is already in the database. This recipe is already in the database. This recipe is already in the database. This recipe is already in the database. This recipe is already in the database. This recipe is already in the database.

From the Cookbook Create Blog

Big, fluffy, and packed with everything from sweet-savory char siu to kalua pork and other delectables. The manapua, a sweet potato from Okinawa, is Hawaii’s counterpart to the Chinese bao (steamed bun). The Royal Kitchen serves baked manapua as an appetizer (Oahu) Take a look at the manapua! Chun Wah Kam’s baked char siu bao is a must-try (Oahu)

What Is Manapua?

The short explanation is that it’s Hawaii’s take on the char siu bao. They’re large and fluffy buns that can be served steamed (for a more traditional presentation) or baked. In this “traditional” manapua, char siu is used as a filling. What exactly is char siu? Roasted seasoned, fatty pork that has been marinated in a char siu seasoning* before being served. It’s a delicious combination of sweet, salty, and saucy! The pork is sliced finely and placed into the manapua dough before being baked.

  • Char siu is a Chinese roast pork dish that is popular in Hawaii.
  • When you deliver a box of fresh manapua to a friend’s house, the first thing they’ll ask (after thanking you) is, well, what flavor manapua do you have?
  • We’ll go over the various fillings in more detail below.
  • Chun Wah Kam serves two types of char siu manapua (one steamed, one baked) (Oahu)

What Does “Manapua” Mean?

Manapua is a term that originates in Hawaii. Essentially, it’s a condensed form of two words:

  • Mea oono puaa, which translates as “delicious pork thing.”
  • Mauna puaa, which translates as “mountain of pork.”
  • Mea puaa, which translates as “delicious pork thing.”

You couldn’t have asked for a more fitting moniker The menu board of Royal Kitchen features Manapua (Oahu)

Different Types of Manapua Fillings

A better name couldn’t have been chosen for you._ Royal Kitchen’s menu board including Manapua (Oahu)

Savory Manapua

  • It is recommended that you start with char siu as your first manapua experiment. The basic filling is char siu
  • However, there are other options. Curry chicken – You know those Japanese curry buns that are filled and deep-fried? Consider this to be the Hawaiian equivalent of those buns. Kalua pig (also known as kalua pork) is a classic Hawaiian dish that is similar to Chinese steam buns. This combination brings me joy
  • Lup cheong
  • Lup cheong For the simple reason that Portuguese sausage is eaten everywhere and with anything
  • It’s a hot dog
  • A vegetarian dish made with long rice, shredded cabbage, carrots, and mushrooms is one of my personal favorites.

Sweet Manapua

  • This is something you should definitely try
  • Coconut
  • Red bean – A typical sweet filling made with red beans
  • Okinawan sweet potato — We utilize Okinawan sweet potato in a variety of meals such as lau lau, taro, and fried rice.

Definitely give black sugar a shot. Sweet fillings made with coconut and red beans are traditional. The Okinawan sweet potato is used in a variety of recipes including lau lau, taro, and other root vegetables.

Manapua versus Bao

Manapua is a variation on the Chinese steamed char siu bao, which is a popular dim sum meal in the United States. During the plantation era* in the 1800s, the Chinese brought char siu bao to Hawaii, where it became popular. In Hawaii, the buns grew in size, and the char siu filling got sweeter as a result. Steaming was the original technique of preparation, although baked manapua became increasingly popular in subsequent years. Many traditional Hawaiian cuisines, such as saimin, shave ice, and even macaroni salad, originated or developed during the plantation era.

Similarities between Manapua and Bao:

  • Both steamed and baked options are available. Both may be filled with savory and sweet ingredients.

Differences between Manapua and Bao:

  • Manapua are much larger in stature
  • Manapua have the seam/closure side facing up instead of down. The bao is made with the seam/closure facing up
  • Both the manapua and the bao require yeast for the dough. However, baking powder and sesame oil are also used in certain manapua dough recipes.

In the Royal Kitchen, you can see the inside of a black sugar manapua (Oahu)

The Manapua Man

Have you ever heard of the manapua man? If not, you should. The term “manapua man” first appeared in the 1800s, at the heyday of the sugar plantation. Following the completion of their contracts as plantation laborers, many Chinese moved on to establish restaurants and snack stores in their communities. In order to increase sales, they would also wander around other areas selling snacks (such as char siu baos) to the locals.which is how they came to be known as “manapua men.” The manapua man is considered to be Hawaii’s national symbol.

In Hawaii, they were quite prevalent.

When I was growing up in the 1990s, I recall seeing the rare modern-day manapua man on a truck, but by the early 2000s, most of them had vanished completely.

You don’t see them very often these days, but when you do, you must stop and enjoy some! Char Hung Sut is a restaurant in Chinatown that serves a variety of dishes (Oahu)

Where To Eat Manapua in Hawaii

There are so many locations to go (full list at the bottom of the post). Manapua are around $1.40-$2.35 per piece. A total of two for lunch (one sweet, one savory) and one for a snack will suffice. Char siu bao (steamed char siu bun) from Char Hung Sut (Oahu) Some of us have strong feelings about which company creates the greatest manapua. But, to be really honest, I enjoy visiting all of the manapua businesses. Some restaurants have unique specialties that others do not; some specialize on baked manapua, while others provide a wide variety of other delectable dishes such as half-moon.

  • Char Hung Sut (Oahu) — This is maybe the most well-known manapua site in the entire island. The hotel is situated on the outskirts of Chinatown. Even though the entrance is difficult to miss, you’ll know you’ve arrived at Char Hung Sut when a long queue spills out onto N Pauahi Street (especially on weekend mornings). They provide both steamed and baked manapua, with the steaming being the superior option. Don’t forget to get some half-moons while you’re there.they’re my personal fave.
  • Royal Kitchen (Oahu) — This restaurant specializes on Hawaiian cuisine. Because they specialize in baking solely, they offer the widest selection of sweet and savory fillings (the first photo at the top of this piece displays some of their manapua filling selections)
  • They also have the best prices. Chun Wah Kam (Oahu) – This establishment is more expensive than the others (but still affordable). Manapua is prepared in two ways: steamed and baked. As an added bonus, there are other places across the city. Bakery: Sing Cheong Yuan Bakery (Oahu) – Get the baked manapua here
  • They’re generous with the char siu filling compared to other bakeries. (All Islands) – Male and female Manapua (Manapua man and woman) Keep an eye out for the manapua man and woman who are hiding in the bushes. Classic manapua trucks are becoming increasingly rare, and you won’t find them in the touristic areas of Hawaii (though you could find them in Pearl City and Ewa Beach if you’re lucky)
  • 7-11 (All Islands) — Yes, that’s right, 7-11! You know how fantastic 7-11 is in Japan, right? Hawaii 7-11 isn’t particularly exciting, but it is still rather good (a billion steps up from 7-11 anywhere else in the US). The 7-11 convenience store is a popular stop for local sweets and snacks, such as fresh and hot steamed manapua. The manapua case may be found just next to the registration. This is the perfect small treat

Manapua Recipe

char hung sut (oahu) – This is maybe the most well-known and visited manapua place in the area On the outskirts of Chinatown, this hotel is a good choice. Even though the entrance is difficult to miss, you’ll recognize Char Hung Sut by the long line that flows out onto N Pauahi Street (especially on weekend mornings). The manapua is available both steamed and baked, with the steaming being the superior option. Don’t forget to get some half-moons while you’re there.they’re my absolute fave.

  • Because they specialize in baking solely, they offer the widest selection of sweet and savory fillings (the first photo at the top of this piece displays some of their manapua filling selections); they also have the best customer service.
  • (but still affordable).
  • There are other spots across the city as an added bonus; Bakery: Sing Cheong Yuan Bakery (Oahu) – Get the baked manapua here; they’re generous with the char siu filling compared to most other bakeries.
  • Classic manapua trucks are becoming increasingly rare, and you won’t find them in the touristic areas of Hawaii (though you could find them in Pearl City and Ewa Beach if you’re lucky); 7-11 (All Islands) — Yes, that’s right, a 7-11 store.
  • Despite the fact that Hawaii 7-11 isn’t particularly exciting, it’s still really good (a billion steps up from 7-11 anywhere else in the US).
  • In front of the cashier, you’ll see a manapua display case.
See also:  How To Do Side Buns With Long Hair

Hawaiian Manapua Recipe

Char Hung Sut (Oahu) — Probably the most well-known manapua site on the island. Located on the outskirts of Chinatown. Even if the entrance is difficult to miss, you’ll know it’s Char Hung Sut because of the long queue that extends out onto N Pauahi Street (especially on weekend mornings). They provide both steamed and baked manapua, with the steaming being the superior option. Make sure to try some half-moons while you’re there.they’re my personal fave. ; Royal Kitchen (Oahu) – This restaurant is located on the island of Hawaii.

  • Manapua is prepared both steamed and baked.
  • Sing Cheong Yuan Bakery (Oahu) — Get the baked manapua here; they’re more liberal with the char siu filling than most bakeries.
  • Keep an eye out for the manapua man and lady who may be present.
  • You know how fantastic 7-11 is in Japan?

Stopping at 7-11 for local delights and snacks, like as freshly steamed manapua, is rather usual. The manapua case is located close to the cash register. This is the perfect small treat.

Ingredients we need:

In Order to Make the Dough

  • 2 teaspoons instant dry yeast
  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour

For the Steamed Pork Bun Filling, combine the following ingredients:

  • 3 cups of dried BBQ pork
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 2 12 tsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp Chinese cooking wine
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 1 tsp corn starch combined with 2 tsp normal water
  • 3 or 4 drops of food color (red)
  • 3 or 4 tsp corn starch mixed with 2 tsp normal water
  • 3 or 4 drops of food color (

How to Make Manapua Step by Step:

Making the Dough with a Stand Mixer:Step 1:First, get a small bowl out of the cupboard. Combine 2 teaspoons instant dry yeast and 1 cup lukewarm water in a mixing bowl. Allow the yeast to soften for 1 minute before continuing. Pour in 2 tablespoons of canola oil and stir to combine, making sure the yeast is well dissolved. Set aside. 2. In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine 2 tablespoons baking powder, 3 cups all-purpose flour, and 2 tablespoons brown sugar. In a separate bowl, mix the dry ingredients on a low speed for 3 minutes, using the dough hook.

  1. You may maintain the pace at a medium level here.
  2. Cover the glass bowl with plastic wrap and store it in a cool, dark location.
  3. Please keep in mind that kneading it by bands will take some time.
  4. That is why I prefer stand mixers over hand mixers.
  5. In a big frying pan, heat 3 tablespoons of any sort of cooking oil till hot.
  6. Add 3 cups of dry BBQ pork to the frying pan and stir until the meat is evenly distributed throughout the onion.
  7. Step 4: After thoroughly mixing, add the cornstarch water mixture.

If you want it to be thicker, you may add more.

Remove the filling from the oven and put it aside.

Step 2:Place the dough back on the lightly floured surface.

Step 3:Place 1 tablespoon of filling in the center of each bun, sealing the sides of the dough together with a circle motion.

Step 5:Steam the manapua that has been prepared over high heat for approximately 15 to 17 minutes.

Step 7: Remove the buns from the steamer and let them to cool for 5 minutes before removing them. If you like, you may serve it with roasted broccoli or mashed potatoes. The best way to savor the flavors to their maximum extent is to consume them while still warm.

Conclusion:

First, prepare a small bowl by placing it in the stand mixer’s bowl attachment. Combine 2 teaspoons instant dry yeast with 1 cup lukewarm water to make a bread dough starter. Allow the yeast to soften for 1 minute before continuing the recipe. 2 tablespoons canola oil should be added now to help combine the ingredients and dissolve the yeast. Set the mixture aside for now. 3 cups all-purpose flour, 2 teaspoons brown sugar, and 2 teaspoons baking powder are combined in a stand mixer bowl. Toss the dry ingredients together with the dough hook on a low speed for 3 minutes, or until well combined.

  1. Medium pace is appropriate in this situation.
  2. Placing the glass bowl in a warm location after covering it with plastic is recommended.
  3. Please keep in mind that kneading by bands will take some time.
  4. I like stand mixers because of this reason.
  5. Step 2: 3 tablespoons of any sort of cooking oil should be placed in a big frying pan.
  6. Add 3 cups of dry BBQ pork to the frying pan and stir until the meat is evenly distributed around the pan.
  7. Adding the cornstarch water mixture after finely mixing is the fourth step.

If you like it thicker, you may add extra.

Remove the filling from the oven and set it aside till later.

Lie the dough out on a lightly floured surface and divide it into 16 equal pieces.

Step 2: Roll the dough into a 5-inch round ball shape using a rolling pin to finish shaping it.

Using a steamer with 2 inches of water ready, place the filled dough in the steamer and cover with a towel.

To turn off the steamer, lift up the lid and allow the steam to escape from the interior of the machine.

After 5 minutes, remove the buns from the steamer and set them on a cooling rack. If you like, you may serve it with roasted broccoli or mashed potato. Serving them warm is the most effective method for maximizing flavor enjoyment.

Manapua Recipe

Enjoy traditional ethnic foods in the comfort of your own home with this manapua recipe, which is both delicious and healthful for people of all ages. If your children have experienced it even once, they will be enthralled. Hawaiian cuisine is served as a side dish. Recipe for Manapua (Keywords) Recipe This recipe makes 8 servings. 195 calories per serving Time Required for Preparation:10MC ooking Time: 30 minutes 40 minutes in total ecipe Ingredients: Bbq Pork Oil Yeast Baking Powder Onion Soy Sauce Flour Bbq Pork Recipe Instructions: Make the dough according per package directions.

Place the filling in the center of the formed manapua.

Savory Duck Buns aka Kalua Manapua Recipe on Food52

I enjoy street food because it serves as a constant reminder of where you are and is one of the most delicious ways I can think of to eat while also interpreting the world. Kalua is a traditional Hawaiian cooking method that involves steaming food, usually a whole pig, in an imu, or in-ground cooking pit, until it is tender. Manapua is a Hawaiian term that refers to the large Chinese bao buns that were popular in the state of Hawaii at the turn of the century. Vendors would sell them from food carts dotted about Chinatown, where they could be found.

  1. My inspiration for this dish came from one of my favorite food trucks, Melt Honolulu, and one of my favorite grilled sandwiches from them, the Duck Confit Melt.
  2. In order to enhance the taste of the meat even more, I used a variety of vinegars, inspired by the tang of adobo.
  3. Fresh cilantro and apricot preserves are then put to each bun after the meat is cooked.
  4. To make things easier, I combined all of the bun ingredients in a single mixing dish.
  5. I hope you find these as entertaining as I do!
Ingredients
  • In addition to reminding me of where I am, street food is also among the most delicious methods I can think of to consume and understand the environment around me. Kalua is a traditional Hawaiian cooking method that involves steaming food, usually a whole pig, in an imu, or in-ground cooking pit, until it is tender and flavorful. At the start of the twentieth century, the term “manapua” was used to describe the giant Chinese bao buns that were popular in Hawaii. Sellers would set up shop in food carts all around Chinatown and sell them to customers. The use of a slow cooker and simple seasonings such as sea salt and liquid smoke may be used to imitate kalua meats at home, without the need to dig an imu. My inspiration for this dish came from one of my favorite food trucks, Melt Honolulu, and one of my favorite grilled sandwiches from them, the Duck Confit Melt. A variety of vinegars was used to enhance the flavor of the meat, which reminded me of the tangy flavor of adobo sauce. In order to balance the tastes of the filling, I added chipotle peppers to each bun after the meat is cooked. Fresh cilantro and apricot preserves are then placed into each bun after the meat is cooked. I wanted the bun to be slightly sweet to match the duck, so I substituted coconut milk for the milk in my other manapua bun recipe (also on this website). In order to make things easier, I combined all of the bun ingredients in a single mixing dish before baking them. Although this dough is more difficult to work with, the resultant bun is soft and aromatic on the inside. Hopefully, you’ll find these as entertaining as I do! – the root of the ginger.
  • In the case of Buns
  • 1 packet active dry yeast
  • 1 packet active dry yeast I use Chao Koh brand coconut milk, which I shake before using
  • 1 / 4 cupwhole milk
  • 1 / 4 cupall vegetable shortening, such as Spectrum, melted
  • 1 / 4 cupall purpose flour
  • 1 / 2 teaspoonkosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 / 3 cupwarm tap water (90-115 degrees – warm but comfortable against your skin – too high a temperature will kill your yeast)
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 31 / 2 cups all purpose flour 1 big egg
  • A splash of water
  • A sprinkle of salt
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil for greasing the bowl
Directions
  1. To prepare the filling, pat the duck legs dry with a paper towel. Mash together white peppercorns with salt in a mortar and pestle until pepper is aromatic and roughly crushed, about 30 seconds. Salt and pepper the duck legs on both sides, pushing the salt and pepper into the flesh of the bird. Cook the meat in a big, wide pot or Dutch oven until it is nearly smoking. Cook the duck legs, skin side down, for approximately 7 minutes, or until the skin is golden and the skin has crisped a little. Transfer the legs to the bottom of the slow cooker, skin side up. Pour the rendered fat over the duck
  2. Then, in a slow cooker, combine the liquid smoke, chopped chipotle, vinegars, and maple syrup, spreading each over each of the four legs. Close the lid and cook on high for four hours. Remove the skin and bones from the cooked duck legs and place them in another bowl. Remove the meat off the bone and lay it in a basin, allowing it to cool somewhat. Cover and place in the refrigerator until you are ready to fill the buns. While the meat is chilling, prepare the buns for baking.
  1. To make the buns, combine the yeast and warm water in a small bowl or Pyrex measuring. Gently whisk in the sugar until it is dissolved. Allow for 5 minutes of softening time. The mixture should froth up and nearly double in size. This indicates that your yeast is active and ready to be used to produce your buns. If the volume does not increase by a factor of two, trash it and start over. Fill a large mixing bowl halfway with flour. Stir in the salt and baking powder until everything is well-combined. Scrape the bottom of the container with a spatula to ensure that all of the yeast mixture is removed. Pour in the coconut milk (I use the same measuring cup that I used for the yeast mixture), the milk, and the melted vegetable shortening, stirring constantly. Make sure to stir the ingredients until it forms a shaggy pile. Turn the dough out onto a cold, lightly floured surface and knead for 5-8 minutes, or until it is smooth and elastic. Sesame oil should be used to grease a big mixing basin. Place the dough in a mixing bowl and flip it to coat it. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set it aside in a warm, draft-free location for approximately an hour, or until the dough has doubled in size. *** If you are approximately 15 minutes away from filling the buns, take the filling from the refrigerator and heat it for one minute in a microwave-safe dish. Combine the shredded duck and cilantro in a large mixing bowl and set it aside near where you will be filling the buns with the filling. Organize the apricot preserves in a small dish and place it close to the duck stuffing for easy access. Cut 16 pieces of parchment paper (about 2″ x 2″) and arrange them on a big baking sheet with a rim. Put the dough aside and once it has doubled in size, punch it down and divide it into 16 equal sections. By gently drawing out the sides of each dough ball with the tips of your fingers, flatten each dough ball into a circular shape. In order to do this, you want the center of the circle to be thicker than the corners (think of it as a sunny side up egg). Using a heaping spoonful of duck filling, fill the center of the bun (the thickest part of your circle). 12 teaspoon of apricot preserves should be placed on top. Using your fingers, carefully gather up the edges around the filling, pinching and twisting the bun to seal it. Transfer the bun, pinched side down, to the baking sheet lined with parchment paper that has been prepared. Repeat the process with the remaining dough and filling until all of the dough has been used. Allow time for the buns to rise for 30 minutes
  2. While the filled buns are rising, preheat the oven to 350°. One egg wash may be made by mixing together an egg, a splash of water, and a grain of salt. Bake for 18-20 minutes, gently brushing the tops of the buns with egg wash. You may either eat them right away or allow them to cool fully before freezing them. I’ve had good success warming manapua in the microwave, using the defrost setting for 30 seconds, followed by an extra 10 seconds, and it’s been delicious. NOTE: As seen in the photo, all 16 can be baked on a single baking sheet, albeit the manapua will most likely puff up and fuse to the one next to it due to the heat. While I was concerned that they would leak, I was able to separate them without incident using a knife.

My most vivid childhood recollections are those that revolve around my family and food. Having grown up with a mother who constantly pushed me to try new foods, as well as two grandmothers who welcomed me into their homes and kitchens at an early age, was a blessing for me. Cooking provides me delight because it allows me to share food with family and friends, and it also serves as a stress reliever. It is something I resort to in both good and terrible circumstances. Now that I have two small children, I make an effort to be mindful of what we prepare and consume as a family.

Despite the fact that I normally cook by myself, my children are my favorite kitchen partners, and I like cooking with them.

My favorite thing about living in Honolulu after spending years on the mainland for college and graduate school is that I get to eat, cook, and raise my children in my hometown of Honolulu.

When I’m not cooking, I’m either assisting people in growing their own organic food or teaching art to schools.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *