How To Make Pork Bao Buns

Steamed Pork Buns (Char Siu Bao) Recipe

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Directions

  • The first step in preparing the filling is to rub five-spice powder evenly over the pork shoulder. Preheat a grill pan over medium-high heat until very hot. Cooking spray should be used to coat the pan. Cook the pork for 18 minutes, or until a thermometer reads 155°, flipping the meat once or twice throughout cooking. Remove the pork from the pan and set it aside for 15 minutes. Advertisement
  • Step 2: Slice the pork crosswise into thin slices, then cut the sections into strips. Pork should be placed in a medium-sized mixing basin. Stir in the onions and the next 7 ingredients (through 1/4 teaspoon salt) until everything is well-combined. Refrigerate after covering with plastic wrap. 3. To prepare the dough, in a large mixing basin, add 1 cup warm water, the sugar, and the yeast
  • Let aside for 5 minutes. In the fourth step, lightly scoop flour into dry measuring cups, and level with a knife. To the yeast mixture, add the flour, oil, and 1/4 teaspoon salt and stir until a soft dough is formed. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and press it down. Knead until the dough is smooth and elastic (about 10 minutes). Toss the dough in a large mixing basin sprayed with cooking spray, stirring to cover the whole surface. Cover and let aside in a warm (85°) area that is free of drafts for 1 hour, or until the dough has doubled in size. (Apply gentle pressure to the dough with two fingers.) If the indentation is still there, the dough has risen sufficiently.) Step 5: Punch the dough down and let it sit for 5 minutes. Make a clean area for the dough to rest on and knead in the baking powder. After allowing dough to rest for 5 minutes, proceed to Step 6 and divide it into 10 equal sections, rolling each into a ball. Make 5-inch circles out of each dough ball, working with one at a time (covering the remaining dough balls to prevent them from drying out). 1/4 cup filling should be placed in the center of the dough circle. Bring the edges up to cover the filling and bring them together at the top. Twist the end of the pinch to seal it shut. To make more dough balls and filling, follow the same technique as described above. 7. Arrange 5 buns, seam side down, 1 inch apart, on each layer of a 2-tiered bamboo steamer, one bun in each tier of the steamer. Stack the layers and cover with the lid. Then fill a big pan half-full with water until the water is one inch deep
  • Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Place the steamer in the pan and steam for 15 minutes, or until the puff and set is achieved. Allow for 10 minutes of cooling time before serving.

Chef’s Notes

Red chili peppers, cilantro, or jalapenos can be used to increase the spiciness of the dish. Cucumbers, cut into little cubes, lend a refreshing crunch to this traditional Asian dish. Hint: The beauty of this recipe is that you don’t have to limit yourself to only using pork products. Make a vegetable, bean, or even seafood bun to go with it.

Nutrition Facts

Per serving: 259 calories; calories from fat 21 percent; fat 6.1 grams; saturated fat 0.9 grams; mono fat 3.2 grams; poly fat 1.5 grams; protein 14.3 grams; carbs 35.7 grams; fiber 1.6 grams; cholesterol 27 milligrams; iron 2.9 milligrams; sodium 343 milligrams; calcium 54 milligrams;

Steamed BBQ Pork Buns (Char Siu Bao) Recipe

Our baked cha siu baoremains one of the recipes that routinely ranks towards the top of our “most popular” list-a testament to how much people like these delectable BBQ pork buns. However, you must try these steamed BBQ pork buns as well! In order to remedy this situation, steaming BBQ pork buns, also known as steamed roast pork buns, have been on our must-do list for a very long time. With good cause, we’ve received a large number of enquiries from readers on how to prepare steamed buns. This fantastic version is a major star ondim sumtables, and is liked by people of all ages and backgrounds.

  • The search for the ultimate steamed bun recipe has been ongoing for as long as we’ve had our Milk Breadrecipe on the site.
  • If you want to prepare your own filling, check out our Chinese Roast Pork Cha Siurecipe!
  • My quest ended with a successful steamed barbecue pork buns recipe in Chinese that I tested and tweaked until it was just right.
  • The pre-boiling of the water in the steamer, as opposed to other steamed buns that are normally started with cold water and steamed at medium heat, causes the buns to rise swiftly, resulting in the top cracking.
  • What a sense of accomplishment it is to finally figure out the solution to a puzzle.

For the steamed pork bun dough:

Dissolve the yeast in the warm water in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment (you can alternatively use a standard mixing bowl and knead the dough by hand). Combine the flour and cornstarch in a separate bowl and stir them into the yeast mixture together with the sugar and oil. To make a smooth dough ball, start the mixer on the lowest speed and let it run until it forms a smooth ball. Place a moist towel over the top and set it aside for 2 hours. (Don’t worry, I didn’t forget about the baking powder.

These buns will be filled with a BBQ pork filling that we previously created for the baked version of these buns (see recipe below). The amounts have been changed to account for the amount of dough used in this recipe.

For the char siu bao filling:

In a wok, heat the oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Stir in the onion for about a minute until it becomes translucent. Reduce the heat to medium-low and stir in the sugar, soy sauce, oyster sauce, sesame oil, and dark soy sauce until well combined. Cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture begins to boil. Cook for a couple of minutes, until the sauce has thickened, adding the chicken stock and flour as needed. Remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the roast pork until well combined (char siu).

  • If you create the filling ahead of time, cover it with plastic wrap and place it in the refrigerator to keep it from drying out.
  • A couple of tablespoons of water can be added if the dough appears dry or if you’re having difficulties integrating the baking powder at this point.
  • It should be let to rest for another 15 minutes after being covered with a moist towel.
  • You may alternatively use paper cupcake liners that have been flattened.
  • Now it’s time to put the buns together: shape the dough into a long tube and cut it into 10 equal pieces.
  • Fill the buns with the filling and pleat them until they are completely closed on the top.
  • Place each cha siu bao bun on a square of parchment paper and steam until soft.
  • (be sure the boiling water does not touch the buns during steaming process).
  • If you are unfamiliar with the practice of steaming dishes in Chinese cuisine, you should also read our guide on how to set up a steamer.
  • Serve your steamed barbecue pork buns while they’re still hot!

For the steamed cha siu bao dough:

  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 3 1/4 cups warm water
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • 5 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 cup canola or vegetable oil
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1-2 teaspoons water (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Dissolve the yeast in the warm water in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment (you can alternatively use a standard mixing bowl and knead the dough by hand). Combine the flour and cornstarch in a separate bowl and stir them into the yeast mixture together with the sugar and oil. To make a smooth dough ball, start the mixer on the lowest speed and let it run until it forms a smooth ball. Place a moist towel over the top and set it aside for 2 hours. (Don’t worry, I didn’t forget about the baking powder. You’ll remember to include it later!)
  • While the dough is resting, prepare the meat filling for the ravioli. In a wok, heat the oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Stir in the onion for about a minute until it becomes translucent. Reduce the heat to medium-low and stir in the sugar, soy sauce, oyster sauce, sesame oil, and dark soy sauce until well combined. Cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture begins to boil. Cook for a couple of minutes, until the sauce has thickened, adding the chicken stock and flour as needed. Remove the pan from the heat and add the roasted pork to the pan. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. The filling should be covered and refrigerated if you are making it ahead of time to avoid it drying out. After the dough has rested for 2 hours, add the baking powder and put the mixer on to its lowest setting. A couple of tablespoons of water can be added if the dough appears dry or if you’re having difficulties integrating the baking powder at this point. Gently knead the dough until it is smooth and elastic once more. It should be let to rest for another 15 minutes after being covered with a moist towel. Preparing the parchment paper: Get a big sheet of parchment paper and cut it into 10 squares measuring 4×4 inches while you wait. Bring the water in your steamer to a boil before you begin cooking. We are now ready to construct the buns as follows: Roll the dough into a long tube and cut it into ten equal pieces using a sharp knife. Each piece of dough should be pressed into a disc about 4 1/2 inches in diameter (it should be thicker in the center and thinner around the edges). Fill the buns with some filling and pleat them until they are closed on top
  • Place each bun on a square of parchment paper and steam until done. Using a bamboo steamer, I steamed the buns in two batches, one after the other (be sure the boiling water does not touch the buns during steaming process). Once the water is boiling, place the buns in a steamer and steam each batch for 12 minutes over high heat, turning the steamer halfway through.

Calories: 687 kilocalories (34 percent ) 42 g of carbohydrate (14 percent ) 78 g of protein (156 percent ) 22 g of fat (34 percent ) 5 g of saturated fat (25 percent ) Cholesterol: 207 milligrams (69 percent ) Sodium: 410 milligrams (17 percent ) Potassium: 1385 milligrams (40 percent ) 1 gram of dietary fiber (4 percent ) 7 g of sugar (8 percent ) Calcium: 64 milligrams (6 percent ) 3.3 milligrams of iron (18 percent )

nutritional info disclaimer

TheWoksofLife.com is written and created only for the purpose of providing information. While we make every effort to give nutritional information to our readers as a general guideline, we are not professional nutritionists, and the figures supplied should be regarded as educated guesses. The nutritional information in any dish will vary depending on a variety of factors such as the brand of food purchased, natural variances in fresh ingredients, and so on. In addition, different online calculators produce varying answers based on their data sources.

AboutJudy

In addition to being the mother of the Woks of Life family, Judy is also the grandmother. She was born in Shanghai and came to the United States when she was 16 years old. She is fluent in both English and three distinct Chinese dialects, and she serves as our professional menu translator when we travel the length and breadth of China. Her passion is for preserving vanishing recipes and customs, and she specializes in all things traditional, from mooncakes to home-style stir-fries, among other things.

Reader Interactions

Gua Bao are light, fluffy Bao buns packed with juicy, sticky pork belly and served with dipping sauce. I’m going to teach you how to make it all at home, from scratch, using my simple, step-by-step formula that anybody can follow. Immediately following your consumption of this, you will be unable to stop thinking about it until the next time you do so. It’s a vicious cycle that I’m kind of enjoying right now. This is exactly the type of street cuisine I desire – and just writing this piece has prompted me to toss away the concept of what we were going to eat for dinner (steak fajitas, by the way) and replace it with this.

  1. These are rather enormous Bao buns (as you can see in the photo below, they totally fill my palm), therefore one of these should be plenty for a full supper meal.
  2. I prepared my first batch of bao buns for Neff in the beginning of the year.
  3. However, I’ve written (and tested) this recipe using mysteam pan.
  4. I use mine all the time for steaming veggies.
  5. Allow me to return to the Gua Bao situation.
  1. Gua Bao are light, fluffy Bao buns packed with juicy, sticky pork belly and served with a sweet sauce. Using my simple, step-by-step recipe, I’ll teach you how to create it all at home, from scratch, in a matter of hours. Immediately following your consumption of this, you will be unable to stop thinking about it until the next time you consume it. A vicious spiral has been created for me, which I find somewhat satisfying. Just writing this piece has inspired me to toss away the notion of what we were going to eat for supper (steak fajitas, by the way) and replace it with this. I had no choice but to eat them again. These Bao buns are rather enormous (as you can see in the photo below, they totally fill my hand), so one should be sufficient for supper. I’ll be cooking extra since we’re a touch greedy, and I’ll save some for lunch the next day. Baking bao buns was something I initially started doing for Neff early in 2014. The fact that I own one of their steam ovens makes heating these buns a breeze. However, I’ve written (and tested) this recipe using my steam pan, which you can find here. This post contains affiliate links. If you don’t already have one, I strongly advise you to purchase one. I use mine on a regular basis for steaming vegetables. Due to the fact that they can be stacked, you may save valuable stovetop space – which is particularly handy when preparing something that requires numerous dishes, such as a traditional roast beef meal (see recipe below). Bring on the Gua Bao, shall we? Please see the recipe card at the bottom of this page for the whole recipe, but here is a quick run-through with some photographs to assist you in the preparation of this dish: My first step is to make the bun dough.
See also:  How To Make Chinese Steamed Buns

After that, steam for 15 minutes in a steam pan: When the buns are going through their initial proof, I generally start slow cooking the pork:

  1. Cook the pork belly slices in a skillet with the stock, ginger, garlic, rice wine, and sugar until they are tender. Simmer for 2 hours or until the vegetables are soft. Drain the vegetables and cut them into tiny bits. While you’re steaming the bao buns, you may start frying the pork belly in a separate pan. Season with salt and pepper and fry till golden brown in a hot skillet with a little oil. In a small saucepan, combine the glaze ingredients (ginger, chilli, honey, brown sugar, soy sauce, and lemon grass paste)
  2. Bring to a boil. Bring to a boil and continue to cook until the liquid is black and sticky.

Add plenty of fresh cilantro (cilantro), spring onions (scallions), strips of chili, sesame seeds, and chopped cashews to the bao buns, and you’ve got yourself a delicious meal! In addition to regular-sized buns, you may make bite-size versions by splitting the dough into twenty (20) or even thirty (30) smaller portions. They’re perfect as a finger snack for a party or as part of a buffet.

Other fillings for steamed bao buns:

  • Add heaps of fresh cilantro (cilantro), spring onions (scallions), strips of chili, sesame seeds, and chopped cashews to the bao buns, and you’ve got yourself a delicious meal! In addition to regular-sized buns, you may make bite-size versions by splitting the dough into twenty (20) or thirty (30) buns. This is a delicious party snack or may be served as a part of a buffet spread.

Other Asian Street Food Inspired Recipes:

  • Pad Thai with king prawns
  • Chicken Lo Mein, which is quite simple to put together
  • Pad Thai with king prawns I’ve created a masterclass article that will walk you through the entire process, from start to end, including how to precisely cook the rice
  • Special Fried Rice Succulent AsianSticky Chicken Wings, or cauliflower wings for a vegetarian option
  • Another vegetarian option is kway Teow (fried rice). MalaysianMee Siam is ready in 30 minutes
  • It is also available in Thai.

The Gua Bao Recipe:

  • Gua Bao are fluffy Bao buns packed with delicious sticky pork belly and served with dipping sauce. In this step-by-step recipe, I’ll teach you how to make it from scratch from scratch. Preparation time: 30 minutes Preparation time: 3 hours Time required for demonstration: 2 hours and 30 minutes CourseDinner, Main Course, and Dessert CuisineAsianServings calories: 667kcal per bao bun

Steamed buns:

  • 3 34 cups (450g) plain (all-purpose) flour
  • 2 tablespoons (equivalent to one packet or 7g) instant dried yeast
  • 3 tablespoons (equivalent to one cup plus 2 tablespoons) whole milk
  • 3 tablespoons (equivalent to one cup plus 2 tablespoons) warm water
  • 3 tablespoons (450g) unsalted butter-very soft
  • 1 tablespoon (equivalent to one packet or 7g) olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons (equivalent to one packet or

Slow Cooked Pork Belly:

  • 4 14 cups (1 Litre) hot chicken/vegetable stock
  • 1 tbspminced ginger
  • 3 cloves garlic-peeled and sliced in half
  • 1 tbspcaster sugar
  • 2.2lb (1Kg) rindless pork belly slices split in half- (each piece being about the length of your index finger)
  • 1 tbspprice wine

Pork Belly Glaze:

  • To make the sauce, combine 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, 1 pinch of salt, 1 teaspoon pepper, 1 tablespoon minced ginger, 1 red chilli, finely chopped, 2 tablespoons phoney, 2 tablespoons brown sugar, 3 tablespoons dark soy sauce, and 1 teaspoon lemon grass paste in a mixing bowl.

Gua Bao Toppings:

  • 1 small bunch coriander (cilantro)-roughly torn
  • 2 small bunches parsley (parsley)
  • 3 small bunches parsley (parsley)
  • 2 red chilies, cut thinly into strips
  • 4 spring onions (scallions), sliced thinly into strips
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 2 tablespoons chopped roasted cashew nuts
  • Begin by preparing the bao buns: whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, and yeast in a large mixing bowl until well combined
  • Transfer the milk, warm water, and butter to a jug and whisk together until the butter is melted. Stir the liquid mixture into the flour mixture with a spoon at first, and then with your hands after a few minutes. Turn out onto a floured board and knead for 10 minutes until smooth and elastic. Alternatively, you can use a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook to complete the process
  • Place the dough in an oiled mixing bowl. Allow to prove for 90 minutes to 2 hours, covered with clingfilm or a moist tea towel. In the meantime, prepare the pork belly as directed on the package. In a large skillet, combine all of the ingredients for the slow cooked pork belly (excluding the glaze ingredient). A cast iron casserole pan is what I use. Bring the pot to a boil, then cover it with a lid and reduce the heat to a low setting for 2 hours. Then remove the pan from the heat and drain the pork. Alternatively, you may conserve the liquid (which would be ideal for a Thai or Chinese noodle soup)
  • Once the dough has proof, turn it out onto a floured surface. Re-knead the dough and divide it into 10 equal-sized balls. Prepare your work surface by laying out a piece of baking parchment and rolling each ball into an oval shape on top of it with a rolling pin (approximately 12 cm x 8 cm in size)
  • Brush each oval with the olive oil and fold each oval over, using a chopstick in the middle of the fold to leave a little space in the fold
  • (so the oil is on the inside of the fold). The chopstick should be removed
  • Prepare two baking pans by lining each pan with a piece of parchment paper. Place the buns on the baking pans while still wrapped in the baking paper
  • This will make it easier to shift them later. Each tray should be covered with clingfilm or a carrier bag* (see note 1) and left to prove for a another hour, or until puffed out. Bring a big steamer pan of water to a boil. Place the buns in the steamer (you may leave them on the baking sheet if you like) and steam for 15 minutes, working in batches. I use this pan, layering two buns in each layer and baking it at 350°F. While the bao buns are steaming, you may continue to cook the pork belly in a separate skillet. Pork should be chopped into bite-sized bits. To make the glaze, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a frying pan while mixing the remaining ingredients in a small dish. Heat the oil in a large skillet and add the pork, salt, and pepper, cooking over a high heat until the meat begins to become golden. Pour the glaze over the pork and continue to cook for another 6-7 minutes, or until the meat is black and sticky. Turn off the heat and transfer to a warm dish until you’re ready to construct the gua bao
  • If you want to stuff the buns with sticky pork belly, coriander (cilantro), slices of red chillies, and spring onions, open them up after they’ve been baked and stuff them with that. Sprinkle sesame seeds and cashews on top of the salad.

Can I make the pork belly ahead?

To create the pork belly, you can go to step 5 and stop there (where the pork is slow cooked and then drained). Refrigerate (for up to two days) or freeze once they have been immediately cooled and covered. Allow the beef to defrost overnight in the refrigerator before slicing and frying it as directed in step 11. In addition, you may prepare the sauce ahead of time and store it in the refrigerator for up to a day.

Can I make the Bao buns ahead?

To create the pork belly, you can go to step 5 and then stop (where the pork is slow cooked and then drained). Refrigerate (for up to two days) or freeze once they have been rapidly cooled. Step 11: Allow meat to defrost overnight in the refrigerator before slicing and frying it. Also, you may prepare the sauce ahead of time and store it in the fridge for up to a day.

Can I freeze the Bao Buns?

Yes, prepare the buns, allow them to cool rapidly, wrap them in plastic wrap, and place them in the freezer. Allow for defrosting overnight in the refrigerator and allowing for the dish to come to room temperature before cooking. You may warm the buns in the microwave for 20-30 seconds per bun if you keep them covered. Alternatively, steam them for 5 minutes to reheat them. You may also reheat the bao buns from frozen by placing them in a steamer for 10 minutes, or until they are hot all the way through.

Nutritional Information is approximate and is per filledlargeGua Bao.

Calories:667kcal Carbohydrates:49g Protein:34g Fat:37g 15 g of saturated fat Cholesterol:82mg Sodium:900mg Potassium:343mg Fiber:2g Sugar:11g 355 International Units of Vitamin A 21.1 milligrams of vitamin C Calcium:41mg Iron:3.3mg Better than takeaway, Fakeaway, and Street Food are some of the terms used to describe this type of food. This post may include affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the links and purchase the product, I receive a tiny compensation (at no extra cost to you).

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Hi I’m Nicky

I enjoy cooking and I’d want to share some of my favorite, tasty, and family-friendly recipes with you. To motivate you to prepare delicious meals for your family on a daily basis, I want to inspire you. More information can be found at

Reader Interactions

Sticky Pork Bao Buns served with Quick Pickled Carrots and Quick Pickled Cucumbers are a delicious combination. It’s a delicious snack or a filling lunch. Recipe includes step-by-step photographs.

Steamed Buns

Following my Instagram Stories, you may have seen that I enjoy making handmade steamed buns for supper pretty frequently. if you have been following me there, thank you! When my children begin to complain that they are eating too much rice or too many noodles, I know it is time to start mixing things up a bit. Bao buns may be an excellent substitute for many Asian dishes, and they can be found in many Asian markets.

Sticky Pork Bao Buns

When we have company, I love to prepare Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Siu Pork), but I also make it for a comfortable mid-week supper every now and again. My version of David Chang’s pork belly buns (of Momufuku renown) is as follows: char siu pork slices are stuffed inside bao buns with pickled cucumbers and carrots, and coriander leaves are sprinkled on top (cilantro). It’s a type of shortened version of a typical Steamed Pork Bun (char siu bao), but with fresher ingredients and more flavorful combinations.

However, if you live in a Chinatown with fast access to store-bought steamed buns and char siu pork, you can whip up these Sticky Pork Bao Buns in minutes with no effort.

How to Make Steamed Bao Buns

Most Asian supermarkets keep plain steamed bao buns in their freezer area, which means you can have a great dinner ready in minutes at any time of day. For those who live in areas where ready-made steam buns are unavailable, or who like the art of bread-making, I have a simple recipe for bao buns that can be prepared from scratch. The end product is a delightfully soft and fluffy bao bun that you may never want to purchase from a store again! My recipe for bao buns, complete with step-by-step images, can be found here.

How to Make Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Siu Pork)

If you live in close proximity to a Chinatown, you will most likely be able to get char siu pork from a reputable Chinese takeaway, just as you would for the steamed buns. Although it appears difficult, creating your own char siu pig is actually fairly simple, and whenever I make Chinese Barbecue Pork, I always make a double batch because the leftovers can be utilized in so many various ways. Cooking leftover char siu pork in the oven is a simple and effective method of reheating it. My char siu pork recipe, complete with step-by-step images, can be found here.

How to Make Quick Pickled Carrots

Asian cuisine is frequently about achieving a harmonious balance of flavors, particularly those of sweetness, saltiness, and sourness. Pickled carrots are frequently used in Vietnamese cuisine to provide a sour aspect to dishes and to counteract the saltiness of other ingredients. They also provide a satisfying crunch to the dish. Pickled carrots are frequently used in Vietnamese Banh Mi sandwiches, and they may also be found as a major garnish for Vietnamese Grilled Pork Chops. Traditional pickling liquid has to be left to work for at least 24 hours, but when speed is of the essence, I like to prepare Quick Pickled Carrots.

The carrots should be chopped into thin matchsticks (also known as “julienned”), and this is best accomplished with either an amandoline slicer or an ajulienne peeler, depending on your preference.

How to Make Quick Picked Cucumbers

In a similar vein to the Quick Pickled Carrots, I prefer to use a 2:1 vinegar to sugar ratio, but you may vary the proportions to your preference. The soft bao buns are enhanced by the addition of quick pickled cucumbers, which offer a wonderful crunch and sourness. If you are really pressed for time, you might omit the pickling completely — my children adore fresh cucumbers, so I offer a good amount of them alongside the bao buns for them to snack on.

See also:  How To Make Two Buns

More Asian Recipes

If you’re looking for more Asian recipes, you might be interested in the following: Braised Short Ribs with Asian Flavors Pork with a Chinese Barbecue Sauce (Char Siu Pork) Chilies that have been pickled Bao Buns (Steamed Buns) Print

Sticky Pork Bao Buns

  • It’s possible that you’ll enjoy the following Asian recipes if you’re seeking for more: Short Ribs with Asian Braising Sauce Grilled Pork with Chinese Seasonings (Char Siu Pork) Chilies in vinegar Chinese Bao Buns that have been steaming. Print

Sticky Pork Bao Buns served with Quick Pickled Carrots and Quick Pickled Cucumbers are a delicious combination. It’s a delicious snack or a filling lunch.

Ingredients

In order to make the Quick Pickled Cucumber,

  • 1 big cucumber, neatly sliced
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 4 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 large cucumber

1 big cucumber, coarsely sliced; 2 tablespoons sugar; 4 tablespoons white wine vinegar;

  • 1 big cucumber, coarsely sliced
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 4 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon salt

In order to make the Spicy Hoisin Sauce

  • Shoisin sauce (eight tablespoons)
  • Sriracha sauce (four teaspoons) (or to taste)
  • Shoisin sauce (eight tablespoons)
  • Sriracha sauce (four teaspoons or more, to taste)

Instructions

In order to make the Quick Pickled Cucumber,

  1. In a mixing bowl, combine the sugar and vinegar
  2. Mix well. Finely slice the cucumber, either with a sharp knife or an amandoline slicer
  3. Set the cucumber aside. Combine the cucumber and pickling liquid in a large mixing bowl. Set aside for at least 10 minutes before continuing. Drain the pickling liquid from the cucumbers just before serving, and gently squeeze the cucumbers to expel any extra liquid.

In order to make the Quick Pickled Carrots,

  1. In a mixing bowl, combine the sugar and vinegar
  2. Mix well. Using a sharp knife, a mandoline slicer, or a julienne peeler, julienne the carrots until they are thin. Combine the carrots and pickling liquid in a large mixing bowl. Set aside for at least 10 minutes before continuing. Drain the pickling liquid from the carrots just before serving, and gently compress the carrots to eliminate any extra juice.

In order to make the Spicy Hoisin Sauce

  1. In a small saucepan, combine the hoisin sauce with the Sriracha sauce
  2. Set aside for later use. Bring the mixture to a gentle boil over medium heat until it is well heated
  3. Serve the sauce while it’s still heated.

In the case of the Steamed Bao Buns

  1. See my recipe for Steamed Bao Buns with step-by-step images for instructions on how to create your own handmade bao buns
  2. Because the bao buns need to steam for 10-12 minutes, I recommend steaming the bao buns (whether homemade or frozen) immediately before serving. As a main course, allow around 3 buns per person.

In order to make the Chinese Barbecue Pork

  1. Pork should be served hot, so reheat the pork as needed before serving it. In most cases, I cover the piece in aluminum foil and reheat it in a hot oven. Thinly slice the pork, allowing about 3-5 pieces per bun
  2. Prepare the buns as directed.

Making the Spicy Pork Bao Buns is a simple process.

  1. Open the bao buns that have just been freshly baked
  2. Spread the Spicy Hoisin Sauce on both sides of the bun to create a sandwich. Place a few slices of Chinese Barbecue Pork into the bread and close the bun. Quick pickled cucumbers and carrots are placed on top of the salad as a garnish. Optional: Garnish with spring onions (scallions), coriander (cilantro), and Pickled Chillies (if desired). Serve as soon as possible

eatlittlebird

Try our recipe for pork belly bao buns, then explore our other pork bao bun recipes, pork dumpling recipes, soup dumpling recipes, and other Asian street food ideas.

How to make the best bao buns

Extra raising agent and double rising are the secrets to making pillowy steamed buns, which are perfect for stuffing with pork belly and serving as a side dish.

Bao buns recipe

  • Extra raising agent and double rising are the secrets to making pillowy steamed buns, which are perfect for stuffing with pork belly and other delicious ingredients.

PORK BELLY FILLING

  • Pork belly slices1kg, skin and extra fat removed
  • Garlic2 cloves, smashed
  • Chinese five spice12 tsp
  • Honey3 tbsp
  • Hoisin sauce5 tbsp
  • Soy sauce4 tbsp
  • Shoaxing rice wine4 tbsp
  • Groundnut oil2 tbsp

GARNISH

  • In order to serve, grate the cucumber and mix it with a splash of rice wine vinegar. spring onions sliced and ready to serve
  • Sriracha chilli sauce ready to serve

Method

  • In a large mixing bowl, combine the sugar and yeast with 250 mL warm water and let aside until the mixture begins to foam slightly. In a large mixing basin, combine the flour with a generous sprinkle of salt, 2 tablespoons oil, and the yeast mixture. With a wooden spoon, combine the ingredients to form a rough dough. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead until it is smooth and soft. If necessary, add extra flour to the dough. Place the dough in an oiled basin, turning it to coat it with oil, then cover and let aside to rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour. The dough should be flattened out with your hands once it has risen. Step 2Tip the dough onto a floured surface and sprinkle with the baking powder. Fold the dough over and knead it until the baking powder is well mixed and the dough is soft and pliable, about 5 minutes. Cover and set aside for 30 minutes to let the flavors to blend. To prepare the pork filling, arrange the meat in a single layer on a baking dish. Pour the marinade over the meat after mixing all of the ingredients. Leave for at least 2-3 hours, if not overnight. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius (fan 180 degrees Celsius/gas mark 6) 6. Place a rack on top of a roasting pan into which you’ve put a little amount of water and set aside. Lift the pieces of pork from the marinade and place them on a roasting rack
  • Step 3Roast the pork for 1 hour, flipping once and basting twice or three times with the remaining marinade, until it is tender. To complete the buns, cut squares of baking paper to fit inside the buns. Step 4Roll out each piece of dough into an oval about 12 x 6cm (use a little more flour if the dough is sticky)
  • Step 5Place on a piece of baking paper, brush one side with oil, and fold gently in half using the paper (you want to be able to open them once they are cooked)
  • Step 6Place on a piece of baking paper, brush one side with oil, and fold gently in half using the paper (you want to be able to open them once they are cooked To steam the buns, put a big steamer over medium-high heat and steam them for 6-8 minutes, or until they are puffed and cooked through (open carefully and check the middle is cooked through). If you allow them to come into contact, they will stick. Cucumber, spring onion, and a squeeze of chilli sauce should be stuffed into the buns after the pork has been cut up. When possible, prepare and eat the dish right away.

Nutritional Information

  • 374 calories
  • 18.6 grams of fat
  • 33 grams of carbohydrates
  • 1 gram of fiber
  • 18.2 grams of protein
  • 1.5 grams of salt

Steamed Pork Bao

374 calories; 18.6 grams of fat; 33 grams of carbohydrates; 1 gram of fiber; 18.2 grams of protein; 1.5 grams of sodium

WHAT’S A BAO(包)?

Chinese may be a difficult language to learn. Bo can refer to a variety of things, including an action of folding something in, a bag, or in this case, a steamed bun. More often, it is referred to as “BoZi” – a general word for steamed buns that are formed like the photo above and filled with various fillings. These BaoZi can be referred to by a variety of names depending on what is within them: red bean bao (hóngdubo ), vegetable bao (CàiBo ), black sesame bao (HiZhMáBo ), and so on. “MiànBo” () is a term used to refer to baked western-style bread that has been baked.

GROUND PORK

Languages like Chinese might be challenging. Bo can refer to a variety of things, including the process of folding something in, a bag, or in this case, a steaming bun. The word “BoZi” is used more frequently, which is an abbreviation for steamed buns that are formed like the picture and filled with various contents. According on what is put inside, these BaoZi are referred to as many things, such as red bean bao (hóngdubo ), vegetable bao (CàiBo ), black sesame bao (HiZhMáBo ), and other variations.

JUICY FILLING

You may wonder how I can make the juiciest filling possible. When it comes to creating beef fillings in Taiwan, a technique known as “”(DShu) is frequently employed. “”(DShu) is a Chinese term that literally translates as “pounding water.” A small amount of water or broth is beaten into the ground pork at a time until it is completely absorbed.

When cooked, this filling is the most juicy you’ve ever had the pleasure of tasting. The same technique is also employed in the preparation of traditional pig dumplings.

THREE CLEAN- MAKING THE DOUGH

When kneading the dough, the aim is to have three clean kneads. This is a guideline that applies to pretty much all of the dough on this blog. Three clean or three shine is referred to as “SnGung” in Chinese, which means “three clean or three shine.” When “PénGung), “ShuGung), and “MiànguGung”) -the dough will pull away from the bowl (bowl should be clean), your hands should be clean, and the dough seems clean, the dough is ready (smooth).

ROLLING PIN

When it comes to rolling pins, I like ones that are easy to operate with one hand. The baos are tiny and circular, therefore rolling the dough with one hand while rotating the dough with the other is the most convenient method. My spouse Sean (AKAKnotty Woodpecker) custom-made a few rolling pins for me because I considered most Western rolling pins to be too large for me. These black walnut rolling pins are extremely simple to use, and they are coated with a natural, food-safe coating. Just as I requested, the rolling pin is 1-3/8 inches thick and 14 inches long, which is just what I needed.

FOLDING THE PORK BAO

I could describe it to you, but it’s probably more convenient for you to just watch a video about it. What is the key to making a beautiful bao? Practice. It’s possible that you won’t get it right the first time, but keep trying! Feel it, experiment with it. Starting with less filler may also be beneficial. This pork bao tastes just like the ones you’d get in Taiwan, and it’s INCREDIBLY DELICIOUS to boot. Pork bao has consistently been among the most popular dishes. Following this recipe, you can prepare real, hot, steaming, juicy, and delicious pork bao in the comfort of your own home.

Course Breakfast, Pork, Side Dish, Snack, and Appetizer are all options.

Asian, Bao, Breakfast, Pork, Steamed Buns are some of the keywords to keep in mind.

Equipment

  • I could describe it to you, but it’s probably more convenient for you to just watch a video of the process. When it comes to making an attractive bao, there are some secrets to remember. Practice. It is possible that you will not do it perfect the first time, but persevere! Get in touch with it and have fun with it! Reduce the amount of filling you start with may also be beneficial. This pork bao tastes just like the ones you’d get in Taiwan, and it’s INCREDIBLY DELICIOUS to boot! A popular recipe, pork bao, has consistently been among the most popular requests. Following this method, you may cook real, hot, steaming, juicy, and tasty pork bao in your own home. A video tutorial on how to fold the paper is also included. Course Breakfast, Pork, Side Dish, Snack, and Appetizer Asian, Chinese, and Taiwanese cuisines are available. Asian, Bao, Breakfast, Pork, Steamed Buns are some of the key words to remember while thinking about Asian cuisine. 20 minutes for preparation Approximately 15 minutes of preparation time Taking a Break40 minutes 1 hour and 15 minutes is the total time. Servings16 Bao AuthorChoochoo-ca-Chew

Filling

  • 1poundGround Pork
  • 2 tablespoons Corn Starch
  • 3 tablespoons Soy Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Toasted Sesame Oil
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon Ground White Pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon Five Spice Powder
  • 1/2 inch GingerFinely sliced
  • 3/4 cup Water
  • 1 large bunch of scallions (about 3 cups chopped)

Instructions

  • Mix 1 cup warm water (warm to the touch) with 1 tablespoon sugar and 1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast—this step aids in the dissolution and mixing of the yeast in the following stage. Using your hands, mix in the remaining dough ingredients until smooth and elastic. The aim is to get three cleans. Your hand should be clean, the dough should appear clean (smooth), and it should be able to pull away from the bowl (indicating that the basin is clean). The dough should be able to easily be pulled away from the bowl and should not be sticky. If the dough is too sticky (summer humidity may cause the proportions to vary), add 1/4 cup flour at a time until the dough is soft, smooth, and not sticky anymore. Rest for 10 minutes after covering with a damp towel. InstaTV @CHOOCHOOCACHEW has the whole footage, which you can see here. You may also use a stand-up mixer fitted with a dough hook to do this task in approximately 6 minutes.
See also:  How To Steam Hot Dog Buns

Filling

  • Prepare the filling while the dough is resting. Add 1 cup of sliced ginger to 1 cup of water and set it aside. 1 pound of ground pork should be beaten with a fork until it is sticky, lumping together, and not crumbly in texture
  • Combine 3 tablespoons soy sauce, 2 tablespoons corn starch, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil, 1/8 teaspoon white pepper, and 1/8 teaspoon five spice in a large mixing bowl. Remove the ginger from the water and set it aside. Add the ginger-infused water to the pork mixture a quarter cup at a time, stirring the meat with a fork after each addition. Check to see that all of the moisture has been absorbed before adding the next 1/4C of water. Repeat the process until all of the water has been absorbed. (Alternatively, a stand-up mixer fitted with a mixing paddle can be used to prepare the pork mixture.) Toss in 3 cups of finely cut scallions with the pork mixture. If you aren’t ready to fold straight away, put it in the refrigerator.

Making Bao

  • Filling may be prepared while the dough is resting In a cup of water, add the ginger slices and let it sit for 10 minutes. To make 1 pound of ground pork sticky, mix together with a fork until it is not crumbly
  • Combine 3 tablespoons soy sauce, 2 tablespoons corn starch, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil, 1/8 teaspoon white pepper, and 1/8 teaspoon five spice in a large mixing bowl
  • Mix well to combine. Take the ginger out of the water and set it aside to cool. The ginger-infused water should be added in little amounts to the pork mixture, about 1/4 cup at a time, while stirring the pork with a fork. Before adding the following 1/4C, be sure that all of the water has been absorbed. Repeat the process until the water has been completely absorbed. (You may alternatively make the pork mixture in a stand-up mixer fitted with a mixing paddle.) Then add the scallions (about 3 cups), and combine thoroughly. If you aren’t ready to fold right away, place it in the refrigerator.

Steaming

  • Make the filling while the dough is resting. Add 1 cup of chopped ginger to 1 cup of water and set it aside
  • 1 pound ground pork should be beaten with a fork until it is sticky, lumping together, and not crumbly
  • Combine 3 tablespoons soy sauce, 2 tablespoons corn starch, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil, 1/8 teaspoon white pepper, and 1/8 teaspoon five spice
  • Set aside. Take the ginger out of the water and set it aside. Add the ginger-infused water to the pork mixture a quarter cup at a time, stirring with a fork after each addition. Check to see that all of the moisture has been absorbed before adding the next 1/4C. Continue until all of the water has been absorbed. (For the pork mixture, you may alternatively use a stand-up mixer fitted with a mixing paddle.) Toss in 3 cups of finely chopped scallions to the pork mixture. If you aren’t ready to fold right away, put it in the fridge.

Storing

  • Consume the baos while they are still hot. Keep them refrigerated for up to a week, or freeze them for up to three months! Steam the baos to bring them back to temperature.

Notes

What should you do with all of that additional money? Make some Taiwanese Gua Bao — it’s like a taco, but with steamed buns instead of corn tortillas! When cooked, the dough turns out to be a fairly nice pizza dough as well; it’s crispy, soft, and fluffy when done.

OTHER RECIPES YOU MIGHT BE INTERESTED IN:

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Momofuku’s Pork Buns Recipe on Food52

Photo courtesy of James Ransom

Author Notes

I’m quite aware of what you’re going to say. What mom in her right mind would consider David Chang’s famous pork buns to be a healthy option? When you live in the same city as Momofuku, what should you make for your children and what should you do at home? I have strong reasons in support of both positions. There are so many aspects to these buns that children adore: Pork belly, a near relative of bacon, is used in these recipes because it is salty, sweet, and texturally fascinating. They are both visually and gastronomically appealing.

  1. What could be more entertaining than small balls of dough that can be smashed and rolled into amusing shapes?
  2. When it comes down to it, the second reason is simply that things are not that difficult.
  3. Quick-pickled cucumbers are ready in minutes, and then it’s only a matter of assembling the buns, which is both the most physically demanding and the most enjoyable portion of the dish.
  4. The finest part about the buns, though, is that they freeze like a dream once they have been steamed to perfection.
  5. The following is a step-by-step guide on how to form the buns: Following the first rise, split the dough into 50 pieces and roll them into little balls before allowing them to rise a second time.

Place a chopstick in the middle of the bun and fold the bun in half over it to enclose it. 3. Gently lift the bun off the chopstick and place it on a piece of parchment paper to finish rising before steaming. David Chang and Peter Meehan’s Momofuku by Merrill Stubbs was adapted for this piece.

Keep an eye on this recipe Pork Buns from Momofuku Nishioka

  • Preparation time: 25 hours
  • Cooking time: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • Yield: around 25 buns
Ingredients
  • 2 thick Kirby cucumbers, sliced into 18-inch slices
  • 6 pounds skinless pork belly
  • 1 / 2 cup plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 / 2 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar
  • Pork belly with quick-pickled cucumbers
  • 6 pounds skinless pork belly
  • 1 / 2 cup plus 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup plus 1/2 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 thick Kirby cucumbers, sliced into 1/8-inch slices
  • 1 cup plus 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt (optional)
  • 2 cups plus 1/2 tablespoon sugar (optional).
Directions
  1. Cooked Pork Belly with Cucumbers Pickled in Minutes
  2. Place the pork belly, fat side up, in a roasting pan large enough to accommodate it snugly. 12 cup of the salt and 12 cup of the sugar are combined in a small dish and rubbed all over the pork shoulder. Seal tightly with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours and no more than 24 hours. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove any liquid that has gathered in the roasting pan and set it aside. Roast the pork belly for 1 hour, basting halfway through with the rendered fat, or until it is golden brown. Raise the oven temperature to 250 degrees Fahrenheit and continue to roast for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until the pork is fork tender. Transfer the pork to a platter, decant the fat and meat juices from the pan, and set them aside for dipping the buns in later on. Allow the pork to cool somewhat before wrapping it in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and placing it in the refrigerator to chill until totally cooled and hard, at least 2 hours or overnight. (You may skip this step if you’re pushed for time, but chilling the belly sufficiently before slicing it is the only way to produce tidy, nice-looking slices in the end.) The remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and 1 teaspoon salt should be combined in a small dish with the cucumbers.
  3. Allow yourself 5 to 10 minutes of resting time. When you’re ready to create the buns, slice the pork belly into 12-inch pieces that are approximately 2 inches long. You may use them right away or chill them for up to 4 hours. Warm in a pan over medium heat for a minute or two, or until the vegetables are tender and well heated. Make use of the pork as soon as possible.
  1. Cooked Pork Belly with Cucumbers Pickled in a Hurry Using a roasting pan that fits it tightly, place the pork belly fat side up in the oven. 12 cup of the salt and 12 cup of the sugar are combined in a small dish and rubbed all over the pork shoulder before cooking. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours, but no more than 24 hours, after wrapping in plastic wrap. Bake at 450 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 minutes. Remove the roasting pan from the oven and discard any liquid that has gathered. Raise the pork belly for 1 hour, basting it halfway through with the rendered fat, or until it is golden brown. Raise the oven temperature to 250 degrees Fahrenheit and continue to roast for another 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until the pork is fork tender. Transfer the pork to a platter, decant the fat and meat juices from the pan, and set them aside for dipping the buns in later. Allow the pork to cool somewhat before wrapping it in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and placing it in the refrigerator to chill until totally cooled and hard, at least 2 hours or more. Nonetheless, if you’re short on time, you may omit this step
  2. However, the only way to produce tidy, nice-looking slices is to cool the belly fully before slicing it. The remaining 1 tablespoon sugar and 1 teaspoon salt should be combined in a small mixing basin with the cucumbers.
  3. Allow for a 5- to 10-minute resting period before continuing. When you’re ready to create the buns, cut the pork belly into 12-inch slices that are approximately 2 inches long. You can use them right away or store them in the refrigerator for up to 4 hours. Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat for a minute or two, or until it is soft and completely melted. Take immediate advantage of the pork.

Sticky pork belly bao buns

  • 8oz boneless pork belly, cut into thick slices
  • 4 tbsp light muscovado sugar
  • 3garlic cloves, sliced
  • Thumb-sized piece ginger, sliced
  • 2star anise
  • 100mlShaosing rice wine
  • 2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
  • Huge sprinkle ofChinese five-spice powder
  • 1 tbsp sunflower oil
  • 1 tbsp dark soy sauce

For the buns

  • 250 g plain flour, with a little extra for sprinkling
  • One-tablespoon white caster sugar
  • One-tablespoon baking powder
  • Two-tablespoon fast-action dry yeast
  • Fifty-milliliters milk
  • One-tablespoon sunflower oil, with a little more for sprinkling on top

For the crushed chilli peanuts

  • 1-tablespoon togarashi spice mix (see tip below)
  • 1 handful toasted peanuts

To serve

  • Corianderleaves, cucumberbatons, and shredded spring onion are some of the ingredients.

Method

  • STEP 1: Preheat the oven to 160 degrees Celsius (140 degrees Celsius fan/gas). 3. In a flameproof casserole dish, heat the oil over a medium-high heat until shimmering. Cook the pork belly in batches until it is nicely browned, then transfer to a dish. Place the sugar in a small saucepan and heat over a medium heat until it begins to dissolve and caramelise, then quickly stir in the garlic, ginger, and star anise and cook for 1 minute
  • STEP 2Carefully pour in the rice wine and soy sauce – be careful, it will spatter – and bring to a simmer to allow the sugar to completely dissolve. After coating the pork with the caramel, add 100ml water and the five-spice and bring the pot to a simmer over medium heat. Cover with a cover and bake for 1 hour and 30 minutes in the oven. Allow to cool slightly before covering with foil and putting on a high heat to boil and reduce the sauce until sticky. Preparation can be done up to 2 days ahead of time and kept cold. With a dash of water, reheat the dish. In a pestle and mortar, grind most of the peanuts until they are coarsely crushed, then add the remainder of the nuts and roughly crush again to get a chunky texture. Toss in the togarashi powder until well combined. The buns may be made up to 2 days ahead of time and refrigerated in an airtight container
  • STEP 4Put the dry ingredients and a generous teaspoon of salt into the bowl of a food processor equipped with a dough hook. Pour in the milk, oil, and 100ml lukewarm water, and mix for approximately 10 minutes, or until the mixture is smooth and elastic. transferring the dough to an oiled bowl, covering with cling film, and allowing it to double in size (for approximately 1 hour)
  • STEP 5transferring the dough to a floured surface and rolling it into a sausage shape Make 10 equal parts of the sausage by cutting it in half. Using a rolling pin, flatten out each part into an oval shape after it has been rolled into a bundle. After carefully greasing each one, fold them over a greased chopstick or skewer and set them aside on a lightly oiled baking sheet to rest for 1 hour, or until they have doubled in volume. Remove the chopstick or skewer from the steaming vessel before steaming
  • STEP 6Heat a steamer and cook the buns on rings of baking parchment for about 10 minutes, or until they are puffy and golden brown. Divide the buns in half and pack each half with a slice or two of the pork, drizzled with some of the sauce, and close the sandwich. Combine coriander, cucumber and spring onions in a large mixing bowl, then top with the crushed nuts and serve.
RECIPE TIPS

Togarashi is a seven-spice blend from Japan that contains crushed chillies, sesame seeds, poppy seeds, and citrus peel, among other ingredients. You may get it at Asian food stores or online from sites like as souschef.co.uk, seasonedpioneers.com, and amazon.co.uk. It is also available in the United States.

Goes well with

Recipe adapted from the May 2016 issue of Good Food magazine.

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