How To Make Steam Buns Fluffy

The Soft and Easy Steamed Bun (Mantou) you need

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What is Steamed Bun – Mantou ‘馒头’

Mantou, also known as Mantau, is a sort of simple soft bun that is often taken for breakfast in China. Personally, I like to top it with nut butter or serve it alongside a savory side dish. You might be wondering why I’m sharing this basic bun that appears to be so straightforward to cook with all of you. I honestly believe that this is not as simple as it appears, especially when I want a flawless layer on top of the foundation. After many failed attempts, I have finally found a recipe that is successful, and I hope you will give it a try as well.

How to make Steamed bun – Mantou

Step 1: Make a mound of flour on a clean surface and set it aside. Next, using your fingers or a spoon, construct a well in the center of the bowl, similar to that of a volcano. Step 2: Make a well in the center of the well and add the yeast, a bit of salt, and sugar. Pour in the water in a slow, steady stream, stirring constantly to incorporate the flour from the surrounding area. A bench scraper comes in handy during this step, which I have found to be very useful. Alternately, combine all of the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl until thoroughly mixed.

  • Continue to step 3 after transferring to a clean work surface.
  • Step 3: This is the most important phase, since you want to eliminate as many air bubbles as possible from the final product.
  • Mine came out to be around 48g per serving.
  • TIP: When you divide the dough, you should see a smooth with no tiny holes on each of them.
  • To correct this, knead each portion of the dough again before shaping it into balls.
  • Following the steaming process, you will have a layer of outer skin that you can simply peel off.
  • Step 6: Fill a large saucepan halfway with water for steaming.
  • Then, using a bamboo steamer, cook the buns for 12 minutes over a high heat until they are soft.

How to knead with mixer

Step 6: Fill a saucepan halfway with water and set it aside to steam the vegetables.

Turn the heat up to high and bring the water to a boil in a large saucepan. Then, using a bamboo steamer, steam the buns for 12 minutes over a high heat setting. Transfer to a heated serving dish or see the storage guidelines below for further information.

Variations

  • Yeast– I used Instant Yeast in this recipe, but if you want to use active dry yeast, check the Cooking Tips section below. Baking Powder Only– If you are unable to use yeast, you may use 2 teaspoons of baking powder in place of the yeast. This approach produces a denser bun that is equally as wonderful as the previous method. When you combine yeast and baking powder, you get a fantastic result since the baking powder will give the yeast an extra kick while it is proving. I used 1/2 teaspoon of the spice in addition to the other ingredients in the recipe. Milk substitute– unsweetened plant-based milk can be used for the water to make the buns milkier in flavor. Buns with flavorings– Try incorporating matcha, cocoa, or berry powder to create vibrant buns.

Steamed Bun (Mantou) Cooking Tips

If you want to use cups instead of a scale, please go to the Notes section beneath the recipe for instructions. Warm vs. room temperature water — I experimented with warm water and Instant dry yeast, and the results were wonderfully soft buns, despite the fact that the tops were wrinkling. However, in this recipe, I used room temperature tap water (which was filtered) from the faucet. If you are using active dried yeast, the ideal method is to combine it with the sugar and warm water separately before adding it to the flour.

  1. When you split the dough into sections, be sure that none of the chunks have any little holes in them.
  2. Do not overproof the dough– Overproofing the dough increases the likelihood of the buns collapsing.
  3. With my little steamer, I start steaming in batches of four while I wait for the last set to proof before starting the next.
  4. If the area begins to bounce back, they are ready to be loaded into the steamer for the ride home.
  5. If you are using a stainless steel steamer, make sure to cover the lid with a piece of cloth during steaming to avoid water condensation from forming.

How to store the buns

  • After the buns have been steamed and allowed to cool, they can be frozen. To reheat the buns, resteam them in the steamer or wrap them in a wet paper towel and microwave for 10 – 15 seconds to warm them up before serving them.

How to serve Steamed Bun (Mantou)

  • As-is
  • Spicy Thai Basil Tofu
  • Vegan Chili ‘Crab’
  • Chickpea Curry
  • As-is

This Steamed Bun (Mantou) is

  • Soft and fluffy
  • Vegan and dairy-free
  • Ideal for dishes that can be prepared ahead of time. You may eat it plain or dress it up with jam, nut butter, butter, or even fry it.

This vegan and dairy-free dessert is soft and fluffy. Make-ahead recipes will benefit from this. Serve with jam, nut butter, butter, or even fried to make it more interesting.

Steamed Buns – Mantou ‘馒头’

  • Simple pantry ingredients are used to create this soft and fluffy bun known as Mantou (Mantou ‘Mantou’ in Chinese). They are excellent on their own, but you can also serve them with jam, butter, or as a complement to a savory dish. Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking Time: 25 minutes 30 minutes of resting time Time allotted: 1hr15mins Breakfast, a side dish, and a snack are all included. CuisineAsian and Chinese cuisines are available.
  • 240 gallons of all-purpose flour about 2 cups
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon instant dry yeast
  • A pinch of salt
  • 133 g water
  • Make a pile of flour on a clean surface and set it aside. Next, using your fingers or a spoon, form a well in the center of the bowl, creating the appearance of a volcano
  • In a well, combine the yeast, a bit of salt, and the sugar. Pour in the water in a slow, steady stream, stirring constantly to incorporate the flour from the surrounding area. A bench scraper comes in handy during this step, as I’ve discovered
  • After about 10 – 12 minutes of continued kneading, you’ll have a very smooth dough to work with. This is the most important stage since you want to get rid of as many air bubbles as you possibly can. Dividing the dough into eight equal portions is a good idea. Mine came out to be around 48g per serving. Using your hands, roll each dough ball into a ball and set it on a piece of parchment paper. See the TIPS section for further information. Allow the buns to rest for 30 minutes, uncovered, before serving. Following the steaming process, you will have a layer of outer skin that you can simply peel off. Instead, you may cover the buns with a moist cloth while they’re rising. Prepare a saucepan of water for steaming by filling it halfway. To begin, turn the heat up to high and bring the water to a rapid boil. Then, using a bamboo steamer, cook the buns for 12 minutes on a high heat until they are soft. Remove the buns from the oven and serve them warm, or refer to the ‘How to keep buns’ section for storing suggestions.
  • I used the spoonsweep method to measure flour into the measuring cup. Fill a normal measuring cup halfway with flour and level the top with a knife so that the flour does not pack down
  • I had around 63g of flour in 1/2 cup
  • The section above under “Kneading the Flour Using a Mixer” describes how to do it using a standing mixer. TIP: When you divide the dough, you should observe a flat surface on each of the pieces with no microscopic holes. These are air bubbles, which signifies that additional kneading is required to eliminate them from the dough. To correct this, knead each part of the dough again before shaping it into balls.

I used the spoonsweep method to measure flour in the measuring cup. Fill a standard measuring cup halfway with flour and level the top with a knife so that the flour does not pack down; I had approximately 63g of flour in a half-cup; and The section above titled “Kneading the Flour Using a Mixer” describes how to do so with a stand-up mixer. The dough should be smooth and without any tiny holes when you divide it, according to the instructions. As a result, further kneading will be required to eliminate the air bubbles.

Feel free to pin the below picture on yourPinterestBoard for easy reference.

I used the spoonsweep method to measure the flour in the cup. Fill a normal measuring cup halfway with flour and level the top with a knife so that the flour does not pack down; I had around 63g of flour in a 1/2 cup; To knead the flour using a standing mixer, refer to the part above under “Knead with a mixer.” TIP: When you divide the dough, you should see a smooth surface on each piece with no tiny holes in it. These are air bubbles, and additional kneading will be required to get rid of them.

ABOUT THESE STEAMED BUNS – How to make fluffy steamed buns

They are not dry, but rather moist in every bite, much like the bao recipe. They also taste nice even when eaten plain, which is a bonus. The fluffy and sponge-like texture on the interior, along with a smooth skin on the exterior, is what distinguishes the best steam buns.

This is a very simple recipe for plain steamed buns; however, you can also stuff them with some filling before steaming them for a more elaborate dish. Steamed Buns that are light and fluffy

Let’s Talk Ingredients – Foolproof Steamed Buns Recipe / Fluffy steamed buns

Make use of the highest-quality flour that is readily accessible. In fact, the texture and color of the buns are affected by this. However, all-purpose flour should not be substituted with any other type of flour, such as wheat flour, tapioca flour, or quinoa flour. The texture and look of the buns will alter as a result of this.

Yeast

The ideal type of yeast for this recipe is instant dry yeast. It is readily available and simple to operate. When it comes to steamed buns, I haven’t experimented with fresh yeast yet. Please let me know how they work out if you do so. Make certain that the yeast you use is not too old or that it has not been exposed to air. All of these factors have an influence on the final product while creating steamed buns.

Sugar

These fluffy steamed buns have a subtle sweetness to them. If you do not want them to be as sweet as this, minimize the amount of sugar you use. Increase the amount of sugar if you want them to be sweeter. Castor sugar, often known as breakfast sugar, is what I’ve used in this recipe. You are also welcome to use ordinary powdered sugar instead. Steamed Buns that are light and fluffy

How To Make Steamed Buns Fluffy

The process of kneading is essential when making any type of bread. You can either use a kitchen aid or do it by hand to accomplish this. It’s easiest for me to do it in my kitchen aid. Once all of the dough has been brought together, the work is not done. There is still more to do. Now is the time to keep kneading by hand or in the mixer until the dough is smooth and elastic. The dough should be soft and non-sticky to the touch. This kneading process takes approximately 6 to 8 minutes. Make sure to use a medium speed setting on your kitchen aid if you want to use one, and if you plan to do it by hand, make sure to knead with your palms rather than your fingers while doing so.

Always wrap the fluffy steamed buns dough in cling wrap while it’s proving in the refrigerator.

How To Make Soft Fluffy Asian Steamed Buns Every Time

These little steamed milk buns must be boiled in a double boiler to be properly cooked. First and foremost, make certain that the water does not come into contact with the buns while they are steaming. To begin, place the buns in the double boiler while the water is still boiling, and then turn the heat down to low. Once the buns have been placed in the dish, cover it. Allow the buns to steam for 3 minutes on a high burner, then 15 minutes on a medium temperature, until they are done. Turn off the heat and allow the buns to sit in the pan for 10 minutes before removing them from the pan.

Steamed Buns that are light and fluffy

Fluffy Steamed Buns Recipe

285 g all-purpose flour15 g corn flour4 g instant dry yeast 285 g all-purpose flour 40% of a gram of castor sugar 15 milliliters of oil Milk (at room temperature): 160 mL 12 teaspoon white gel food color (optional) (optional) each bun with a pinch of salt and 12 tablespoons milk rubbed in

Instruction to make these fluffy steamed buns

Combine all of the all-purpose flour, corn flour, yeast, sugar, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Mix thoroughlyNext, add the oil and milk and stir with a spoon until everything is well-combined. This dough will need to be kneaded for 6-8 minutes. The dough should be smooth and elastic. Place the dough in a basin that has been lightly oiled. Wrap the bowl tightly in plastic wrap and let it aside at room temperature for 30 minutes to an hour. Once that’s done, add the white food coloring (if using) and knead until the color is evenly distributed throughout.

Keep the buns in a circular form, keeping in mind that they will spread a little when steaming.

Steaming the buns

Place each of the buns on a piece of parchment paper to prevent them from sticking together. Lightly massage some milk onto the tops of each bun with your finger and let it aside for another half an hour. During this time, wrap the buns in a towel to prevent them from drying out. Fill a double boiler halfway with water, making sure the water does not come into contact with the buns while they are steaming. Allow the water to come to a rolling boil. In a boiler, place the buns with the parchment paper piece tucked beneath each one of them.

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After you’ve finished, don’t open the lid for 10 minutes.

Notes – fluffy steamed buns

The color of the dough is enhanced by the addition of white gel food coloring. It’s something I like to include to ensure that I get white buns. If you don’t want to do it, that’s OK. Recipes for sourdough bread

Fluffy Steamed Buns Recipe

Recipe for Chinese bread

Recipe Card – Fluffy Steamed Buns

What is the best way to make steamed buns fluffy? It’s hard to believe that these small Fluffy Steamed Buns are only 100 calories each. They’re simple to make and turn out perfectly every time. In this post, I’m going to provide a really simple bread that is delicious even when eaten on its own. Whenever you can get your hands on some freshly cooked, hot, and soft fluffy steamed buns is the finest moment to consume them.

  • Ingredients: 285gramsall-purpose flour
  • 15gramscorn flour
  • 4 grams instant dry yeast
  • 40 grams cane sugar
  • 15 milliliters oil
  • 160 milliliters milkroom temperature
  • 12 teaspoon white gel food coloroptional
  • A dash of salt
  • 12 teaspoon milk to brush into each bun
  • Add the all-purpose flour, corn flour, yeast, sugar, and salt to a large mixing bowl and mix well. Mix thoroughly
  • Add the oil and milk, and stir with a spoon until everything is fully blended. This dough will need to be kneaded for 6-8 minutes. The dough should be smooth and elastic
  • Place the dough in a basin that has been lightly oiled. For 30 minutes, cover the bowl in plastic wrap and set it aside at room temperature. Once that’s done, add the white food coloring and knead until the color is evenly distributed throughout the dough. Divide the dough into equal portions (the buns I steamed were 60 grams each)
  • Knead each portion of the dough thoroughly in your palms, making sure all cracks stay at the bottom and the top is smooth. Keep the buns in a round shape, keeping in mind that they will spread slightly while steaming. Place each of the buns on a piece of parchment paper to prevent them from sticking together. Lightly massage some milk onto the tops of each bun with your finger and let it aside for another half an hour. During this time, cover the buns to prevent them from drying out. Fill a double boiler halfway with water, making sure the water does not come into contact with the buns while they are steaming. Allow the water to come to a rolling boil. Using the parchment paper sheet underneath each bun, place them in the boiling water. After 3 minutes of steaming on a high burner, decrease the flame to medium for the remaining 15 minutes. After you’ve finished, don’t open the lid for 10 minutes. Remove the buns from the oven and allow them to cool for 10 minutes before serving.

The color of the dough is enhanced by the addition of white gel food coloring. It’s something I like to include to ensure that I get white buns. If you don’t want to do it, that’s OK. Videos — Most recipes include two videos, one in the article and another on this recipe card. The short version is in the post, and the more extensive version is on this recipe card. If you enjoy my videos, please consider subscribing to my channel. Calculations for nutrition information and metric conversion are performed automatically.

I cannot guarantee the veracity of the information. If this information is crucial to you, you should double-check it with your favorite nutrition calculator. Thank you very much. [email protected] tag me on Instagram with the hashtag bakealish

In conclusion,

Steamed bunsormantou are made from cotton and are soft, puffy, and fluffy. This recipe for Chinese steamed buns is simple, fast, and completely fail-proof, requiring only 20 minutes of active preparation time!

Mantou

Chinese steamed buns, also known as mantou (), are one of the most famous steamed bun recipes in the world of Chinese cuisine. In this post, you will discover the quickest and most straightforward method for making handmade steamed buns, often known as mantou buns. This recipe is really quick, simple, and completely fail-proof. A plate of steaming hot buns will be ready in less than 1 1/2 hours, including proofing time, if you follow the recipe exactly.

Steamed Buns Recipe

Even while mantou buns may be purchased from Chinese grocery shops or restaurants, they are quite simple to cook at home. My steamed buns recipe just calls for four (4) essential components, which are listed below: Although I prefer milk in my mantou recipe, you may use water or soy milk if you like. You may use low-fat or skim milk for whole milk in this recipe, but I recommend using whole milk for the best results.

How to Make Steamed Buns?

Making mantou may be accomplished in two ways. Traditionally, mantou are produced entirely by hand using natural materials. Hands are used to knead the dough together. My approach is the quickest and most straightforward method available. To begin, put the milk, yeast, and sugar in a large mixing bowl. As a result, you will save time because there is no need to “activate” the yeast beforehand. Following that, I kneaded the dough for 6 minutes in a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. Afterwards, I molded the dough into a log and divided it into eight equal pieces.

Frequently Asked Questions

Even though I don’t recommend freezing them, they can certainly be kept in the refrigerator. Leftovers should be placed in a plastic bag and stored in the refrigerator for up to one week. To prepare them for serving, simply reheat them for 1 minute in a steamer or microwave.

How to Make Chinese Steamed Buns Whiter?

Just before steaming, add 1 teaspoon of Chinese white vinegar to the water in your steamer’s reservoir. It will give the buns a brighter, more white look.

Can I Use this Recipe to Bake Baozi or Bao?

Yes, it is possible. Baozi () or bao are steamed buns with fillings that are popular in China. Steamed bao buns are essentially mantou buns with a filling in the middle. It makes use of the same dough recipe as before.

Is Chinese Steamed Buns the Same as Korean or Japanese?

Some of the dishes in Korean recipes and Japanese recipes are descended from Chinese cuisine. Steamed bao buns made in Korea and Japan are extremely similar to Chinese bao buns in taste and appearance.

How Many Calories Per Serving?

In total, there are only 183 calories in each bun.

What Dishes To Serve with this Recipe?

Mantou is best served with condensed milk or soy milk. I offer the following recipes for a filling and nutritious Chinese breakfast. Learn how to make quick and easy meals! Preparation time: 20 minutesPreparation time: 10 minutes Extra Time is available. 1 hour and 30 minutes Time allotted: 1 hour and 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 teaspoons sugar
  • 350 g (12.3 oz or about 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast

Notes

When measuring the flour, please use metric measurements. Whole milk, low-fat milk, and skim milk are all acceptable options. You may use water or soy milk for the milk in this recipe. You may use 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream and half cup whole milk to get the greatest flavor. For those who don’t have access to a stand mixer, knead the dough by hand for 15-20 minutes, or until the dough is smooth on top. If the dough is still sticky after 6 minutes of kneading, you can add another 1-2 teaspoons of flour to help bind the dough together.

To begin, fill the pan or skillet halfway with water, then add a small bowl. Following that, place a plate on top of the bowl. It is possible to lay the steamed buns on a plate and cover the pan or skillet with its lid to keep them steaming.

Nutrition Information

1Amount per portion of food Calories183 1 gram of total fat Saturated Fat0gTrans Fat0gUnsaturated Fat0gSaturated Fat0gTrans Fat0g Cholesterol2mg Sodium17mg Carbohydrates37g Fiber1g Sugar2g Protein6g

Mantou Recipe (Fluffy Chinese Steamed Buns)

These mantou are more than just a basic accompaniment to sweet steamed buns; they are fluffy, ultra-soft, and somewhat sweet. Making mantou is a simple recipe that will show you how to prepare hot and freshly steamed Chinese bread for your next breakfast or supper.

What is mantou?

Around 300 BCE, the Qin State in China was thought to have invented mantou, or Chinese steamed buns, which were later popularized by the Zhou Dynasty in China. Often associated with the legend of Zhuge Liang, these Asian buns were given the name mántóu (which translates as “barbarian heads” in Mandarin), which means “barbarian heads.” Traditionally round or semicircular in shape, these sweet steamed buns are now considered a staple dish in Northern China, alongside rice and noodles. These steamed buns may look familiar to you since they are similar in appearance to baozi, usually known as bao for short.

I’ve primarily had two types of mantou (both steamed and fried variants) at several Chinese eateries in my neighborhood (some of my favorites areHappy FamilyandCapital Seafood).

Because they are a staple in Chinese culture, you can find them premade in the refrigerator and frozen aisles of your local Chinese grocery stores, such as 99 Ranch, where they are available.

There are a plethora of various sorts of mantou available these days, including plain milk, sweetened, whole wheat, taro, chocolate, and even matcha mantou.

Types of flour for mantou vs bao

In many ways, my mantou recipe is similar to my char siu bao recipe, with the exception that it calls for wheat starch (which is NOT the same as all-purpose flour, but is a completely distinct item) instead of cornstarch and that it employs a different method of handling the dough. If you’ve ever eaten mantou in a restaurant, you’re probably familiar with the ultra-white coloring that results from the use of white bleached flour and, in some cases, wheat starch. Because of its low gluten content, the use of wheat flour might result in a mantou with a particularly soft and bouncy texture.

Many Chinese dishes, such as cheung fun, steamed bao buns, andchar siu bao, call for the use of wheat starch.

The use of white bleached flour and wheat starch is essential in order to achieve the ultra white hue of traditional steamed buns.

Others recommend adding vinegar to the water while steaming, however this does not work in my experience. I make my mantou with unbleached flour, which gives it a creamier appearance rather than a pristine white appearance.

Tips for making Chinese steamed buns

After creating several batches of mantou, here are some techniques I’ve picked up along the road that I’d like to share:

  • A scale is essential for weighing out all of your ingredients in order to create a foolproof recipe
  • To flatten the dough, use your pointer finger to press down on the top border of the dough with your thumb. This thinned-out border will assist you in sealing the log of dough once it has been rolled. Before rolling out the dough, brush on some water to help it cling to itself and seal more effectively
  • To roll out the log of dough, use the palms of your hands to do so. This will assist in combining all of the layers and preventing them from spreading excessively. The dough should rest in the steamer over warm water for 20 minutes to prove, but not longer than that, because it will overproof and wilt after it has been steaming for a long period of time. Proofing can give you a nice and fluffy texture for your Chinese bread
  • After it has finished steaming, remove the steamer from the heat and allow it to rest for at least 4 minutes without taking the cover off it. Resting allows the temperature inside the steamer to come down and prevents the mantou from being shocked. When you remove the cover from the mantou too soon after steaming, the mantou may collapse and get wrinkled.

Serving and storage

Mantou can be served simple or with condensed milk, according on your preference. You may also pair it with savory meals such as char siu to make a delicious meal. If you have any leftover steamed buns, you may store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. They should be good for 3-4 days if kept in the fridge. Using a moist paper towel, I wrap them in the microwave for 30 second intervals until they are nice and toasty.

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 50 grams (1 1/4 cups) wheat starch
  • 5 grams (1 teaspoon) baking powder
  • 7 grams (2 1 4 teaspoons) instant activated yeast
  • 50 grams (1 1/4 cups) white granulated sugar
  • 130 grams (4.5 fluid ounces) filtered waterroom temperature
  • 24 grams (1 fluid ounce) neutral cooking oil
  • 1 fluid ounce (1fl oz) filtered waterfor brushing
  • The following items will be needed: stand mixer (or mixing bowl with wooden spoon)
  • Parchment paper
  • And a brush
  • In a mixing bowl fitted with a dough hook attachment, combine the all-purpose flour, wheat starch, baking powder, yeast, and sugar until well combined. Reduce the speed to the lowest setting and continue stirring until the entire mixture is evenly distributed. Increase the mixer speed to level 2 by a small amount. Combine the water and oil in a mixing bowl. Slowly pour the liquid into the mixer until it is fully incorporated. Increase the speed to the fifth setting. Continue to knead the dough on medium (approximately level 5) for another 5 minutes after it has formed a ball (and is no longer stuck to the sides). The dough ball should be smooth and free of lumps, and it should be able to completely detach from the sides of the bowl. Remove the dough from the mixer and shape it into a ball with your hands. Repeat with the remaining dough. Hover your hands over the ball while forming a heart with your thumbs and fingers, then use the ball to make circular movements to create a tight, smooth surface on a clean surface. Place the ball in a dish and cover it with a lid, allowing it to rest for at least 5 minutes before continuing. Poke the ball of dough with your finger to see if it leaves a mark
  • If it does, you can start rolling it into balls. Transfer the dough ball to a clean surface and knead it a few times with the heel of your palm to release any extra gas from the dough.
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Dough kneading

  • Roll the dough out into a rectangle form with a 14-inch thickness, using a rolling pin to get the desired shape (if you scaled the recipe, you will need to adjust this part). If it’s clinging to the surface too much, sprinkle a little flour on top of it. Using the top half of the paper, fold it towards the centre, then fold the bottom half over the middle fold to form a trifold. Turn the rectangle 90 degrees and roll it out into a 14-by-9-inch rectangle once again. Repeat the process once more. When the dough is finished, it should have a very smooth texture and contain no air bubbles.

Rolling

  • Make a downward motion with your pointer finger on the top edge of the dough while pressing down on it. You should be able to get a very thin edge. This will assist in the sealing of the roll. Use the brush and dip it into the filtered water to clean the surfaces. The dough should be brushed on top
  • Take the bottom edge of the dough and fold it upwards to begin the roll
  • Repeat with the other side. Keep rolling until the log is as tight as possible without allowing any air bubbles to escape. You should end up with a log at the end of your efforts. Make a small pinching motion with the edge of the log to seal the edges. Making use of the palms of your hands, gently roll out the log to ensure that the layers adhere to one another. The log should be around 16 inches in length. Cut it into pieces that are 2 inches thick using a sharp knife. Cut the parchment paper into approximately 3 3 squares. Lay each piece on a square of parchment paper
  • Fill a saucepot halfway with heated water and place the steamer on top. Place the mantou pieces in the steamer, making sure that each one is at least 1 12 inches apart from the others–these will expand. Cover the bowl with a lid and set aside for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, uncover the bowl and check the dough
  • It should be at least 1 12 times larger. Replace the cover and put the heat up to high on the stovetop once again. As soon as the water starts to boil, reduce the heat to medium-low and continue to steam for another 20 minutes. If the water level falls below a certain point, add more. If you are unable to put all of your proofed bao into your steamer at once, store the remainder in the refrigerator to prevent them from proving any more in the meantime. The process of proofreading should be slowed by chilling them. To bring them to room temperature before steaming them, remove them from the refrigerator approximately 5 minutes before steaming them. After 20 minutes, remove the pot from the burner and allow the steamer to rest for 4 minutes before lifting the lid. This will prevent the mantou from deflating as a result of a sudden change in temperature. Discard the lid and begin serving the mantou immediately.

Make a downward motion with your pointer finger on the top edge of the dough and press down on it. A very thin edge should be obtained. Sealing the roll will be aided by this. The brush should be used in conjunction with the filtered water. The dough should be brushed on top; take the bottom edge of the dough and fold it upwards to start the roll; repeat with the other side. Keep rolling until the log is as tight as possible without introducing air bubbles; you should end up with a log at the bottom.

  • Roll the log out slightly with the palms of your hands to ensure that the layers adhere to one another.
  • Cut it into 2-inch-thick chunks with a sharp knife; and Cut the parchment paper into approximately 3 1/3-inch-square pieces.
  • The mantou pieces should be added to a steamer one at a time, making sure that each one is at least 1 12 inches apart because they will expand.
  • Replace the cover and bring the heat up to high on the stovetop once again.
  • Make sure there is enough water in the tank.
  • Slowing down the proofing process should be aided by chilling them.
  • After 20 minutes, remove the pot from the heat and allow the steamer to rest for 4 minutes before lifting the lid.
  • Discard the lid and begin serving the mantou right away.

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This recipe provided me with the smooth, fluffy texture that I was seeking. As a substitution for 1/2 cup warm water, I used 1/2 cup warm milk, which I believe helped to make the dough even lighter and fluffier than it already was. Because the dough was extremely sticky and difficult to work with, I had to add an additional 1/4 cup of flour to the recipe. It was only after the 3 hours for the first rising that I noticed that the dough had a slightly sour aftertaste, similar to that of sourdough bread, which became more noticeable after steaming the buns (I steamed a golf ball sized amount of dough to test for texture and taste before I rolled and steamed the rest of the dough).

To fill the bun, I used a homemade meat filling recipe that I developed.

UPDATE: *Tip* I’ve successfully doubled the recipe without encountering any difficulties – use the same amount of yeast as in the original recipe (1 TB or around 1 envelope dry yeast), but double all of the other ingredients to achieve the desired result.

Most helpful critical review

Because I was making this recipe for the first time and didn’t want to wind up with an excessive amount of rolls if I didn’t enjoy them, I scaled it down to make 6 rolls instead of 24. While I’m not sure if this was due to the fact that I used allrecipes.com or the recipe itself, I found that I needed to add a LOT more flour than the recipe asked for in order to avoid turning the dough into a watery mush, which threw off the balance of the yeast, baking soda, and sugar. I basically ended up with chewy dinner rolls as a result of my efforts.

  • There are 111 5star ratings, 57 4star ratings, 11 3star ratings, 7 2- and 1-star ratings, and 4 1-star ratings.

This recipe provided me with the smooth, fluffy texture that I was seeking. As a substitution for 1/2 cup warm water, I used 1/2 cup warm milk, which I believe helped to make the dough even lighter and fluffier than it already was. Because the dough was extremely sticky and difficult to work with, I had to add an additional 1/4 cup of flour to the recipe. It was only after the 3 hours for the first rising that I realized that the dough had a little sour flavor, similar to that of sourdough bread, which became more obvious after steaming the buns (I steamed a golf ball sized amount of dough to test for texture and taste before I rolled and steamed the rest of the dough).

To fill the bun, I used a homemade meat filling recipe that I developed.

UPDATE: *Tip* I’ve successfully doubled the recipe without encountering any difficulties – use the same amount of yeast as in the original recipe (1 TB or around 1 envelope dry yeast), but double all of the other ingredients to achieve the desired result.

When you’re ready to consume them, simply place them in the refrigerator to defrost for at least overnight before steaming them for 10-15 minutes.

DO NOT allow the buns to come into contact with the water.

I stuffed it with red bean paste, similar to what I used to eat at home in Singapore, and it turned out to be far better than I remembered.

I made sure to follow the recipe to the letter.

However, measurements taken in cups are never truly accurate in any case.

Because I didn’t have a bamboo steamer (although it would have been better in a bamboo steamer because of the fragrance from the bamboo), I used Alton Brown’s brilliant idea of poking holes in my disposable pie pan and placing it on top of a metal cookie cutter in a wok to steam the vegetables.

  • At the very least, it isn’t enough to disturb me.
  • Overall, we are quite pleased with it.
  • Thank you so much for taking the time to share.
  • All of the ones I’ve tried have failed to deliver the same level of flavor and light texture as this one.
  • The dough is quite sticky.
  • Due of the extended rise time, I added 1/2 tablespoon of baking soda to the dough to mitigate the “sour” taste that resulted.
  • This allowed the dough to quadruple in size in little over an hour and a half (instead of 3.) I packed my buns with a meat/veggie combination and let the buns rise for a further 25 minutes before steaming them in a big steamer.

I think I ate four buns in a single sitting.

These buns didn’t turn out to be particularly white (like in stores.) But it was simply handmade buns, so it didn’t bother me at all!

Also, add little baking powder to your dough to make it more rise.

This is an opportunity to make some extra white buns!

TRY IT OUT AND SEE WHAT YOU THINK!

Everything turned out well, and everyone enjoyed themselves.

  1. The suggestions made by user Mukinsvivi ROCK made it possible for me to make steamed buns that were really delicious.
  2. You can punch it down in the manner specified in the directions.
  3. Obviously, I didn’t use the entire 3/4 cup, but I came pretty close.
  4. In order to prevent me from overdoing it, the extra flour was introduced gradually.
  5. As a result, my buns turned out very white.
  6. My steamed buns turned out to be rather huge, yielding around 12.
  7. Because my steaming pot is tiny, it took a long time to steam all of the buns, which were a little reluctant to cling on the steaming plate.

This allows the bottoms of the buns to dry thoroughly.

When I make these again, I might try stuffing them with fruit, just to see how they turn out.

They have a slight chewy texture and are extremely light, almost “airy.” I used half of the dough to make 12 buns (as directed by the recipe), and the other half was used to make 6 medium-sized buns (see photo).

The little buns were more difficult to fill with meat filling and were far too fragile to handle.

When assembling the buns, keep in mind that the edges should be thinner than the center.

I will continue to search for the “ideal” bun recipe, but I will have this one on hand as well.

If you create more than you intend to consume and store it in the refrigerator, remember that when food is not fresh, it becomes unpalatable.

Whether it was the fault of allrecipes.com or the recipe itself, I found that I needed to add far more flour than the recipe asked for in order to avoid turning the mixture into a watery mush.

I basically ended up with chewy dinner rolls as a result of my efforts.

Steamed Bao Buns

Detailed instructions and photographs on how to create the ideal, soft, and fluffy steamed bao buns. To create the ultimate handmade bao buns, follow these tips and methods. They’ll be excellent for stuffing with your favorite fillings. In this section, you will find methods for steaming bao buns on the stovetop and in a steam oven.

Bao Buns

It was about 2004 that David Chang introduced his version of Pork Belly Buns to the menu of his restaurant, Momofuku Noodle Bar in New York, and no one could have imagined that the modest bao buns would go on to become an international gastronomic sensation. Even I made a point of getting a table at Momofuku every time I was in New York, no matter how lengthy the line was. His concept of transforming a normal bao bun into a sandwich or hamburger of sorts, packed with delicious pork belly and a simple garnish of pickled cucumbers, was absolutely brilliant to me.

Homemade Bao Buns

Bao buns were not to be found in Zurich’s stores or restaurants (and this is still the case in 2019! ), so I set out to make my own using a recipe from David Chang’s cookbook, Momofuku, to make steamed bao buns from scratch. After a few years of experimentation (David Chang’s bao bun recipe yields almost 50 buns! ), I settled on the recipe below, which I use on a regular basis throughout the year.

Why This Recipe Works

  • Bao buns are a steamed bun that is light, fluffy, and pillowy in texture, and they are ideal for stuffing with your favorite ingredients. Make the bao buns anyway you like using this recipe
  • It’s all up to you. This recipe may be used to make bao buns that are filled or stuffed. Once the buns have been rolled out, all that is left to do is fill and shape them before allowing them to rise for the second time according to the instructions. After they’ve been cooked, the bao buns may be frozen and then warmed in the steamer

Steamed Buns

Buns are traditionally circular in form, with a filling that is either char siu or minced pork mixed with slices of Chinese lap cheong sausage and boiled egg. Char siu pork is the most common filling, although other fillings are also popular. Steamed buns can also be cooked simple, that is, without any filling, to serve as an appetizer. Traditionally, in my family, we prepare simple steamed buns, which are circular in form and tied at the top with a twisted knot, to go with roast duck on Sundays.

Bao Buns Recipe

If you’re lucky, your local Asian supermarket may have pre-made bao buns in the freezer part of their establishment. It is possible that this simple bao bun recipe will need some planning and preparation, but you will be rewarded with delectably fluffy handmade buns that will thrill everyone who tries them.

How to Make Bao Buns

Bao buns could be available in the frozen area of your local Asian grocery store if you’re lucky. It is possible that this simple bao bun recipe will need some planning and preparation, but you will be rewarded with delectably fluffy handmade buns that will impress everyone who tries them.

See also:  Who Sells Footlong Hot Dog Buns

Step 2

The dough for my bao buns is made in my electric stand-mixer; however, you may certainly create everything by hand if you so choose. Using a dough hook on a medium speed, incorporate the liquid components into the dry ones. If you are using a different type of flour than that specified in the recipe, you may require more or less liquid than that specified. You just need a small amount of liquid to bring everything together into a soft dough.

Next, with the mixer still running on medium speed, knead the dough until it is soft and smooth to the touch. This should take around 10 minutes with a stand mixer on medium speed, or approximately 5 minutes if done manually.

Step 3

After the dough has become soft and smooth, I recommend kneading it by hand for a few more minutes on the kitchen counter top to finish it off. In order to determine whether the dough is ready, push your finger into the dough and produce an imprint in the dough. If the dough bounces back, it indicates that it is ready. If the imprint is still visible, you will need to knead the dough a little longer. Place the ball of dough back into the (clean) mixing basin and set the bowl somewhere warm for around 60 to 90 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size, to rise and expand.

Step 4

As soon as the dough has doubled in size, punch it down and knead it by hand for approximately 5 minutes to release any air bubbles that may have formed in the dough. Afterwards, roll out the dough until it is approximately one centimeter in height. Rub a small amount of oil onto the surface of the dough with your hands. Using this method, you will be able to avoid the dough from sticking together later on while shaping the buns.

Step 5

To cut out rounds from the dough, use an 8 cm (3 inch) diameter cookie cutter. Continue to re-roll the dough as needed until you have used up all of the dough in the recipe.

Step 6

Place the rounds on a small sheet of baking paper – I prefer to use simple white cupcake wrappers that I flatten with a rolling pin to make them easier to handle. This saves me the time and effort of having to cut a sheet of baking paper into little pieces before using it. Then, using a rolling pin, carefully flatten the dough to make the bun shape. Repeat with the remaining rounds.

Step 7

Set everything on a big baking sheet, cover with a tea towel, and set it aside somewhere warm for approximately 30 minutes to let the buns to rise again and become more puffed. It should have taken around 10 minutes for the bao buns to rise somewhat and puff out a little.

Step 8

In the meantime, heat the steamer on the stovetop (see notes below). The buns should be steamed in batches for 10 to 12 minutes, or until they are fluffy and soft, and the insides are cooked through.

How to Proof Dough

The yeast in the dough must be activated in a warm atmosphere in order for the dough to rise properly. You might try one of the following suggestions if you don’t have a warm spot in your house:

  • In the oven with the oven light turned on (this is only applicable to certain ovens)
  • On the lowest shelf of the oven, there is a baking plate filled with boiling water. Use around 1 litre (4 cups) of water, then top it up after approximately 1 hour of cooking
  • Cook at a low temperature of around 25-40°C (77-104°F) in the oven or a steamer oven

How to Steam Bao Buns

  1. Using a bamboo steamer to steam bao buns is a terrific way to save money, and Asian grocery shops usually have a big selection of sizes available at reasonable costs. Aside from the low cost, another advantage of bamboo steamers is that they are attractive when used to serve food at the table. I recommend that you get the largest steamer that will fit your saucepan and stovetop. In order for it to work properly, the bamboo steamer must be the same size as the saucepan you are using below it. To illustrate this point further, if you are using a bamboo steamer with a diameter of 12 inches, your saucepan should likewise be 12 inches in diameter
  2. If you plan to make bao buns (or even dumplings) on a regular basis, I recommend purchasing at least two steamer baskets that can be stacked on top of each other to reduce cooking (and waiting) time
  3. If you plan to make dumplings, I recommend purchasing at least two steamer baskets that can be stacked on top of each other. For those who are serious about creating bao buns, I recommend investing in a multi-tiered metal or stainless steel steamer, which can be found at most Asian grocery shops or online. These are also available in a variety of sizes and have the added benefit of being dishwasher-safe
  4. Fill the saucepan about one-third of the way with boiling water, and then lay the steamer baskets on top of that. Place the pot with the steamer baskets on the stove over a low-medium heat and cook for 10 minutes. There is a chance that the bao buns will overcook or even turn soggy if you steam them at a high enough temperature
  5. However, if you steam them at a lower temperature, the buns will be OK. Place the bao buns in each steamer basket, leaving enough space between them for them to rise and expand during cooking. Cover and steam for approximately 10 to 12 minutes, or until the buns have risen and are light and fluffy when opened.

Tips For Making Bao Buns

  • Plain flour (all-purpose flour) is fine for this recipe, since the cornflour (cornstarch) will aid in giving the buns a light and fluffy texture due to the use of cornstarch. It is not necessary for the buns to be a blinding white as those available in Chinese restaurants
  • Nonetheless, the taste and texture should remain the same. To get the pure white appearance of buns found in Chinese restaurants, I recommend using bleached flour, which can be obtained at Asian grocery shops or online. In order for the dough to rise properly, it must be kneaded for the necessary period of time. It is possible that failing to knead the dough adequately can result in buns that are blotchy in appearance (but still taste delicious), and this is due to not mixing the ingredients together well enough and/or failing to remove all of of the air bubbles from the dough. To prevent the buns from becoming soggy, steam them on a low-medium heat until they are just cooked through.

How to Make Steamed Bao Buns with a Steam Oven

The following methods should be followed for proving the dough as well as steaming the bao buns in an electric steam oven or a combi-steam oven:

  1. First Proof: Place the dough in a large basin that has been gently greased and let aside for 30 minutes. Use some cling film or a disposable bowl cover to keep the contents of the bowl safe. For approximately 1.5 hours, or until the dough has doubled in size, proof the dough in the steam oven/combi-steam oven at 40°C / 104°F
  2. First, form the bao buns and set them on a tiny piece of baking paper each, then transfer them to a big tray that will fit inside your steam oven/combi-steam oven. Second, proof the bao buns. I can put a big sheet pan into my steam oven, which will adequately accommodate 12 bao buns. There is no need to wrap the buns with plastic wrap. Proof the bao buns in their formed forms at 40°C / 104°F for around 30 minutes, or until the buns have swelled up significantly
  3. Steaming the Bao Buns: Remove the tray of bao buns from the steam oven/combi-steam oven and place it on a baking sheet. Raise the temperature to 100°C / 212°F if necessary. As soon as the steam oven/combi-steam oven has reached the desired temperature, return the tray of bao buns to the oven and steam them for 10-12 minutes.

Freezing Bao Buns

Bao buns are ideally consumed fresh, and as soon as they are steamed, if at all possible. Bao buns can be preserved in zip-lock bags in the freezer for up to two months if they are not used immediately. To reheat frozen bao buns, just steam them for about 5 minutes, or until they are thoroughly warmed through.

What to Serve with Bao Buns

One of my favorite ways to serve bao buns is to stuff them with char siu pork and pickled veggies that I make in a flash.

For further information, please refer to my recipe for Sticky Pork Bao Buns. Other excellent toppings for bao buns include the following: Braised Short Ribs with Asian Flavors Pickled Chillies, Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Siu Pork), and other condiments Print

Steamed Bao Buns

★★★★★4.8from32reviews

  • The resting time is 2 hours, the preparation time is 1 hour, the cooking time is 10 minutes, and the total time is 1 hour 10 minutes. This recipe makes 12-16 buns. Recipe Type:Bread
  • Cooking Method:Stovetop
  • Cuisine:Chinese

Resting time: 2 hours; preparation time: 1 hour; cooking time: 10 minutes; total time: 1 hour and 10 minutes; yield: 12-16 buns Recipe Type:Bread; Cooking Method:Stovetop; Cuisine Type:Chinese

Ingredients

  • 300 g (2 cups) plain flour (all-purpose flour) or unbleached flour
  • 125 g (1 cup) cornflour (cornstarch)
  • 5 tablespoonscaster sugar (super-fine sugar)
  • 1 teaspooninstant yeast (also known as instant dried yeast or fast-action dried yeast) (see Kitchen Notes)
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 180 ml (3/4 cup) warm water
  • 60 ml (1/4 cup) vegetable oil, plus extra
  • 300 g (2 cups) plain flour (

Instructions

In order to prepare the buns

  1. In a large mixing bowl or the bowl of an electric stand-mixer (if using), combine all of the dry ingredients
  2. Mix well. Using a measuring jug, pour the heated water and oil into the pan. The water should be somewhat warmer than lukewarm in order to aid in the activation of the yeast, but it should not be boiling hot. Mixing the liquid components into the dry ingredients using the dough hook at a medium speed is recommended. If you are using a different sort of flour than what is specified in the recipe, you may require more or less liquid than is specified in it. Continue kneading the dough on medium speed until the dough becomes soft and silky to the touch until you’ve achieved a sticky dough consistency. This should take around 10 minutes with a stand mixer on medium speed, or approximately 5 minutes if done manually. After the dough has become soft and smooth, I recommend kneading it by hand for a few more minutes on the kitchen counter top until it is elastic. Replacing the ball of dough in the (now-empty) mixing bowl
  3. Use some cling film or a disposable bowl cover to keep the bowl covered. Placing the bowl in a warm location for 60 to 90 minutes will allow the dough to rise and double in size.

In order to form the buns

  1. To remove any air bubbles that may have formed in the dough, punch it back and knead it by hand for around 5 minutes after it has doubled its size. Then, using a rolling pin, roll out the dough until it is approximately 1 cm in height. Rub a little oil into the surface of the dough with your hands
  2. To cut out rounds from the dough, use an 8 cm (3 inch) cookie cutter. Re-roll the dough as many times as necessary. Place these circles on a small piece of baking paper – I prefer to use simple white cupcake wrappers that I flatten with a rolling pin – and set them aside to dry. Fold each circle in half and then gently flatten the dough with a rolling pin to make the bun shape
  3. Set everything on a big baking sheet, cover with a tea towel, and set it aside somewhere warm for approximately 30 minutes to let the buns to rise again and become more puffed. After this period of time, the bao buns should have inflated up a little.

In order to steam the buns

  1. In the meantime, prepare the steamer on the stove (see the Kitchen Notes section below). Puff and soften the buns by steaming them in batches for 10 to 12 minutes or until they are completely cooked through
  2. Serve the buns as soon as possible.

Kitchen Notes

The many types of yeast* Please keep in mind that there is a difference between instant yeast (also known as quick dried yeast or fast-action dried yeast) anddried yeast while baking (also calledactive dry yeast). When in doubt about the sort of yeast you have, look for instructions on how to utilize it on the package. If you use instant yeast, you may add it right to the flour mixture without having to wait for it to activate first. If you don’t have instant yeast, I would recommend using the same quantity of dried yeast as you would with instant yeast.

  1. Combine the dry ingredients in the recipe above with the yeast mixture and vegetable oil, and mix well.
  2. Although the buns will be a pale yellow in color, they will taste delicious.
  3. INSTRUCTIONS FOR STEAMING BAO BUNS* Place the steamer basket (whether bamboo or other material) directly on top of a saucepan that has the same size and shape.
  4. ***Place the steamer basket on top of the saucepan.
  5. Place the lid on top of the steamer basket and close the lid tightly.
  6. How to Make Bao Buns in a Steam Oven*First Proof: Cover the bowl with cling film or a re-usable bowl cover to prevent the buns from drying out.
  7. There is no need to wrap the buns with plastic wrap.
  8. * Preparing the Bao Buns by steaming them: Take the tray of bao buns out of the steam oven/combi-steam oven and set it aside.
  9. As soon as the steam oven/combi-steam oven has reached the desired temperature, return the tray of bao buns to the oven and steam them for 10-12 minutes.

To reheat frozen steamed buns, place them in a stovetop steamer for approximately 5 minutes, or until they are completely warmed through. CONVERSIONSIf you need to convert from cups to grams, or vice versa, you may use this handyConversion Chart for Fundamental Ingredients.

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This recipe was initially published on May 17, 2019 and has since been updated. More detailed recipe notes have been added to the original version.

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