How To Make Taro Buns

Steamed Taro Buns

Featuring a consistently light and fluffy dough, this recipe for Steamed Taro Buns is filled with mashed home-made taro paste in the centre and steamed to perfection. The taro paste has a subtle sweetness to it, as well as a nutty undertone.

What is taro?

Taro is a starchy root vegetable that is frequently mistaken with ube, or even purple sweet potato, due to its similar appearance. It has a beige color on the outside with purple specks on the interior. The taro root’s exterior is rough and brown in color, and it has a rough texture.

Why you’ll love this recipe

You’ve probably tried your hand at Chinese-style steamed buns before, but these Taro Buns are a fresh take on the classic. It is created using a handcrafted mashed taro paste that is slightly sweet, nutty, and delectably creamy. The buns are made using only a few simple ingredients and are quick and simple to prepare.

Ingredients you’ll need

For the filling, use the following ingredients:

  • In order to prepare the filling, combine the following ingredients:

To make the filling, combine the following ingredients:

  • Bao flour: This is an unique sort of flour that gives the buns a soft and light texture
  • If you can’t locate it, you may substitute all-purpose flour instead. water
  • Buns are made with active dry yeast, which functions as a leavener. The addition of granulated sugar provides a hint of sweetness
  • However, you can use any sweetener of your choice. Baked goods are given an extra lift and fluffiness by the use of baking powder.

How to make the buns

In this recipe, bao flour is an unique sort of flour that gives the buns a soft and light texture; if you can’t locate it, you may substitute all-purpose flour. water; Buns are leavened using active dry yeast, which is a kind of yeast. If you don’t want to use sugar, you can substitute any other sweetener of your choice. Baked goods have more lift and fluffiness because of the inclusion of baking powder.

Substitutionsvariations

When taro paste is not available, you can use mashed sweet potato, red bean paste or lotus seed paste for the same results.

FAQstroubleshooting

My buns have completely fallen! One or more of the following scenarios may have occurred: The buns might have overproofed by the time they reached the steamer, which would explain why they were overproofed. In order to determine whether the dough is ready to be steamed, poke a hole in it and watch to see whether it bounces back gently. If the buns leave an indentation when pressed, they have been overproofed. In contrast, if the dough bounces back rapidly, it indicates that it is not quite ready.

  • Remove the buns from the heat and set them aside to cool.
  • My buns have a golden tint to them.
  • Yellow buns will not have an impact on the taste, but if you like white buns, you may use bleached bao flour to get them.
  • A bamboo steamer is recommended for making these buns since it produces the greatest results.

How to servestore

Enjoy the buns while they are still hot and fresh from the steamer.

Cooled buns can be stored at room temperature for up to 2 days if they are stored in an airtight container. For up to 1 week, you can keep the buns in the refrigerator. You may store the buns in an airtight container in the freezer for up to 3 months.

How to reheat

Steam the buns for 10-15 minutes over boiling water to reheat them while retaining their soft, fluffy texture and soft, fluffy texture. With the exception of an emergency, I don’t advocate microwaving the buns.

Other recipes you may like

You might also enjoy the following recipes: Steamed Red Bean Paste Buns with Homemade Taro Paste, Real Taro Milk, and Real Taro Milk Bubble Tea Steamed Custard Buns with Adzuki Red Bean Paste, cooked from scratch (Lai Wong Bao) Tell me if you attempt this dish and how it turned out. I really like looking at your works! Please tag me on Instagram @siftandsimmer or leave a comment/rating in the section below!

Steamed Taro Buns

Steamed buns that are soft and fluffy, topped with a delectable handmade taro paste. Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking Time: 15 minutes 30 minutes of resting time Time allotted: 1hr15mins Breakfast and Dim Sum are on the menu. Asian and Chinese cuisines are available. 10 servings; 108 calories per serving When weight (metric) measures are available, use them in baking recipes to ensure accuracy and precision.

  • 254 g bao flour or all-purpose flour
  • 5 g baking powder
  • 135 ml warm water
  • 15 g granulated sugar
  • 6 g active dry yeast
  • 10 mlavocado oil or light vegetable oil
  • 1 batch Homemade Taro Paste
  • In a large mixing basin, whisk together the flour and baking powder until well combined. Give it a brief whisk to combine the flavors. Warm the water, sugar, and yeast together in a small mixing basin. To activate the yeast, give it a good stir and allow it to get frothy. Using your hands, knead the flour with the active yeast mixture until a dough is formed. Toss in the oil and continue to knead until the dough is smooth and elastic
  • Allow the dough to rest for approximately 20 minutes after covering it. 10 equal parts of the dough should be divided
  • Roll out the dough into a disc with a rolling pin, making it slightly thinner around the edges and somewhat thicker in the centre. Fill the dough with a scoop of taro paste, then pleat the dough to bind it in place. Place the bun on a piece of parchment paper with the seam facing up
  • Repeat the process with the remaining ingredients. Cover the buns and let them aside in a warm place to rise until they are somewhat puffy, about 15 minutes. Place the buns in a steamer (don’t overcrowd it) and steam them for 12-15 minutes over boiling water, depending on their size. If necessary, steam in small batches. Close and leave the buns in the steamer for 5 minutes after removing them from the heat. Do not open the cover at this point, as the buns may collapse
  • Otherwise, continue baking. Immediately turn off the heat and open the steamer lid slightly to let the steam to escape
  • As soon as the steam has subsided, lift the cover and get in to the buns right away

calories: 108kcal|carbohydrates: 21g|protein: 3g|fat: 1g|saturated fat: 1g|sodium: 54mg|potassium: 33mg|fiber: 1 g|sugar: 2 g|vitamin C: 1 mg|calcium: 34 g iron: 1 g iron iron iron iron iron iron iron iron iron The nutritional information supplied should be regarded as approximate and should not be relied upon for accuracy. Please use your best judgment to verify that food is cooked properly and/or that it is a suitable fit for your dietary needs.

Taro Bun – Steamed Taro Bun

Taro paste is used to make this simple steamed sweettaro bun. This taro bun recipe is real, foolproof, and tastes just like the ones served at Din Tai Fung restaurants.

Steamed Taro Bun

Taro, sometimes known as yam in countries other than the United States, is one of my favorite foods. Taro is a root vegetable that happens to be one of my favorites. Taro root has a mellow, nutty flavor that complements many dishes. It has a slick and starchy feel to the touch. A frequent ingredient in many Asian cuisines, whether either sweet or savory, it is yuzu. Steamed buns with taro paste were made using the following ingredients: taro, sugar, and baking powder. These sweet taro buns are identical to the ones served at Din Tai Fung, with the exception that they are baked entirely from scratch.

Recipe Ingredients

A few items are required for this sweet taro bun:

Taro Bun Recipe

What is the best way to prepare taro buns? This recipe is really simple and virtually foolproof. To begin, I prepare the delicious taro paste. Taro is steamed, then sugar is added to make it sweet. Following that, I prepare the dough for steamed buns. The next step is to stuff the taro paste into the dough and then cook the buns in a steamer until they are soft. It’s just that simple!

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes, you very certainly can.

After constructing the buns, place them in a freezer bag and freeze for later. Simply place the buns in a plastic bag and secure the bag with a rubber band. You may store the food in the freezer for a few weeks. Simply cook the buns in a steamer until they are soft and fluffy before serving.

What is a Substitute for Taro?

Taro may be found at Asian stores, among other places. If you are unable to locate taro, you may absolutely substitute a yellow or orange sweet potato in its place.

How Many Calories Per Serving?

The calories in this dish are 213 calories per bun.

What Dishes To Serve with this Recipe?

You may serve these buns with a variety of Chinese cuisines. I propose the following recipes if you want to recreate a Chinese restaurant experience like Din Tai Fung. Learn how to make quick and easy dinners! Preparation time: 30 minutesCooking time: ten minutes 1 hour of additional time Time allotted time: 1 hour and 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • Prepare the following: 450 g (1 lb) peeled raw taro root
  • Scant 1/2 cup fine sugar, or to your liking

Dough:

  • 2 1/2 teaspoons fine sugar
  • 350 g (12.3 oz or roughly 2 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 cup water

Instructions

  1. Taro should be chopped
  2. Taro Paste should be made by steaming the taro pieces in a steamer over high heat for 10-15 minutes, or until the taro pieces are thoroughly cooked through. They should be readily broken apart after they are cooked
  3. Add the sugar to the steamed taro. Using a masher, crush the tarointo a paste. Make 12 taro balls out of the taro paste you just made. Cover them up and set away
  4. Prepare the the Dough. Add the milk, yeast and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. Stir the mixture using a pair of chopsticks or a spoon
  5. Add the flour to the yeast mixture. Turn on speed 1 and knead the ingredients until it forms a smooth dough, about 6 minutes. The dough hook should be removed from the stand mixer if it begins to “climb up” it. Push the dough back down into the bowl. Transfer the dough out and cover it with plastic wrap and let rest for 5 minutes
  6. On a slightly floured surface, roll the dough with your hands until the surface looks smooth. Divide the dough into 12 balls and roll each ball out on a moderately floured board until it is about 1/8 inch thick. Place a taro ball in the center of the dough and wrap it up tightly, pinching the ends together to seal it. Place the taro bun on a piece of parchment paper that has been cut into a rectangle. Repeat the process with the remaining ingredients
  7. Place the taro buns in a steamer to steam for 15 minutes. Cover the steamer with its cover and let the dough balls to rise for 60 minutes, or until they double in size. You prevent the taro buns from sticking together, be sure to leave adequate space between each one. Fill the bottom of the steamer halfway with water. Cover the lid with caution. Turn the heat to high and steam the taro buns for 10-12 minutes, or until they are soft, puffy, and fluffy in the center. Remove the pan from the heat and serve the steamed taro buns while still warm.

Notes

Please see the recipe for steamed buns for a thorough step-by-step breakdown of the dough preparation process.

Nutrition Information

Serving Size: 12 bunsAmount Per Serving: 213 calories 1 gram of total fat Saturated Fatty Acids0g Unsaturated Fatty Acids0gTrans Fatty Acids0g Cholesterol2mg Sodium17mg Carbohydrates47g Fiber3g Sugar11g Protein4g

Taro Buns (Banh Mi Ngot Nhan Khoai Mon)

Baking these light and fluffy taro root buns (Banh Mi Ngot Nhan Khoai Mon) will result in fluffy buns filled with a creamy taro root filling. The buns, which are baked till golden brown, are simple to make and provide a delicious treat at any time of the day. The mix of the delicate, soft bread and the substantial taro root filling is a mouthwateringly delicious combination. Instead of being too sweet like most bakery-style buns, these homemade Taro Buns contain just the proper amount of sugar to balance off the sweetness.

  • Make sweet buns with a variety of sweet and savory fillings using this sweet dough recipe.
  • These Taro Buns are a delicious quick breakfast option, as well as a fantastic school or work snack.
  • Ham and cheese, peanut butter and jelly, and hot dogs are just a few of the filling possibilities that the kids will go crazy about.
  • Keep it as basic as possible and exclude the filler.
  • They’re light and fluffy, and they make a delicious accompaniment to any meal.
  • In comparison to classic croissant-style pastries, these rolls are a lot lighter, and I particularly enjoy them with a cup of coffee in the mornings.
  • If you have a sweet bun creation that you’d like to share, please leave a remark for me in the section below this one.
  • Navigate to the video To the Recipe Card, click here.

Notes on the Taro Buns Recipe, Tips and Tricks

This dough should be pliable and somewhat sticky to the touch. If the dough becomes too wet or too dry while mixing, add additional flour or water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and mix until the dough is no longer wet or dry. A usual occurrence is that the dough will adhere to the bottom of the mixing bowl. As long as the dough retains its shape and does not ooze, it is not too moist to bake with. At the same time, avoid over-flouring the dough, which will result in a dry, heavy bun. The resting durations for the dough may vary based on the temperature of the air.

  1. Make use of a heated oven to expedite the procedure.
  2. When dealing with the dough and shaping it into buns, use just a little dusting of flour; too much flour will make the dough tough to work with.
  3. Make sure not to overshape the buns.
  4. While resting for a second time, the buns will rise uniformly and shape themselves into attractive, round buns.
  5. Optionally, prepare the taro root filling the day before and keep it refrigerated until needed.
  6. Either the giant taro root or the little potato-like taro root should be used.
  7. When working with a smaller root, I like to strain the mashed taro root to get a smoother texture and a more uniform color.
  8. Once it has cooled, it will thicken even more.
  9. Place a baking sheet filled with hot water on the bottom oven rack.
  10. This technique is excellent for creating a delicate, moist feel in baked items of any kind.

After this time, store them in the refrigerator for up to 1 week, or until they go bad. To reheat, place the bread in a toaster oven or microwave on Low power for 20-30 seconds until warmed through. Taro Buns can be stored in the freezer for up to 3 months. Instructions may be found in the video.

If you enjoy this Taro Buns (Banh Mi Ngot Nhan Khoai Mon) recipe, you may also like:

Sweet Bun with Custard Filling Banh Bao (Steamed Pork Buns)Baked Pork Buns (Banh Bao) (Banh Bao Nuong)

See also:  How Do You Make Bao Buns

Taro Buns / Banh Mi Ngot Nhan Khoai Mon

IngredientsFilling 8 ounces of peeled and cleaned taro root 3 cups water 1 Tbspcorn starch+ 2 Tbsp water 1/4 cup sugar 1 tspvanilla sugar 1/4 tsp salt purple food coloring Dough 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil 1/4 cup hot water (100-110 degrees Fahrenheit) (38-43 C) 2 1/4 tspactive dry yeast+ 1 tsp sugar 2 1/2 cupsall-purpose flour a quarter cup of sugar a half teaspoon of salt 1/2 cup whole milk, room temperature 1 big egg (about) unsalted butter at room temperature (around 2 tablespoons) Using Egg Wash 1 big egg yolk (optional) a half cup of water Directions The Taro Root Filling is ready to be made.

  1. Cut the taro root into tiny pieces using a sharp knife.
  2. Cover the pan and bring it to a boil over medium-high heat.
  3. Cook for another 15 minutes, or until the taro root is mushy, covered once more in the pot.
  4. Return the 1/3 cup liquid to the taro root and mix well.
  5. Transfer the mixture to a large nonstick frying pan.
  6. Whisk until the mixture is smooth.
  7. Stir in the corn starch mixture until everything is well-combined.

Turn the heat down to a bare minimum.

Transfer to a clean mixing bowl and cover with plastic wrap to cool completely.

Completely cover the interior of the bowl with oil by brushing it on.

Bring everything together.

Add the all-purpose flour, 1/4 cup sugar, and salt to a large mixing bowl and mix well.

Combine the yeast mixture and milk in a mixing bowl.

Toss in the butter.

Using a spatula, scrape the sides of the basin and push the dry ingredients into the middle of the bowl during the first minute.

) Add in the other ingredients and mix for a total of 8 minutes.

More vegetable oil should be used to the dough.

Place the dough in the oven and bake for approximately 1 1/2 to 2 hours, or until it has doubled in size.

Transfer the dough to a work surface and sprinkle extra flour on top of it.

Making Round Buns is a simple process.

Cut each piece into 12 equal pieces and roll each piece into a rough ball to make a ball.

To begin, take a dough ball and gently flatten it with your fingertips.

Using a cookie scoop, scoop out 1 1/2 tablespoons of taro filling and set it in the center of the cookie dough.

Pinch the dough together at the top of the ball, and then twist it together.

Using your hand, cup the ball around the ball and rotate in a circular motion for approximately 10 seconds to smooth and form the bun.

Place the buns on a large baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes.

Allow for 30 minutes of resting time after covering with a moist towel.

Cut the dough in half and flatten each half into a rectangle that is approximately 10 inches by 6 inches and 1/4 inch thick.

Divide the taro filling in half and distribute it over each portion of the dough, starting at the bottom.

Roll the dough into two logs by applying gentle pressure to the surface.

Each log should be cut into six equal pieces.

Toss the mixture onto a large baking sheet.

Making the Egg WashMix the egg yolk and water together in a mixing bowl.

Place the buns in the oven and bake for 15 minutes, or until golden brown.

Return the pan to the oven and bake at 400 degrees Fahrenheit (204 degrees Celsius) for another 3-5 minutes, or until golden brown.

Allow to cool on a wire cooling rack for a few minutes before serving. Warm or at room temperature, the Taro Buns are delicious. Tao Buns can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Freeze for a maximum of three months. This recipe makes 12 buns.

Tools I Love and Use in My Kitchen

A creamy taro root filling is the star of this recipe for sweet Taro Buns, which produces light, fluffy buns with a light, fluffy texture. The buns, which are baked till golden brown, are simple to make and provide a delicious treat at any time of the day. The mix of the delicate, soft bread and the substantial taro root filling is a mouthwateringly delicious combination. Instead of being too sweet like most bakery-style buns, these homemade Taro Buns contain just the proper amount of sugar to balance off the sweetness.

Dough

  • 1/2 cup whole milk, room temperature
  • 1 egg large
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
  • 1/4 cup hot water, 100-110 F (38-43 C)
  • 2 3/4 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Egg Wash

  1. Cut the taro root into tiny pieces using a sharp knife. Transfer to a medium-sized saucepan and cover with 3 cups water. Cover the pan and bring it to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to Low after stirring everything together. Cook for another 15 minutes, or until the taro root is mushy, covered once more in the pot. Remove the cooking liquid from the pan, reserving 1/3 cup. Return the 1/3 cup liquid to the taro root and mix well. Whip the taro root with a hand mixer until it is smooth and creamy, about 1 minute total. Transfer to a large nonstick frying pan and set aside. In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the corn starch and 2 tablespoons water. Whisk until the mixture is smooth. Add the sugar, vanilla sugar, and salt to the beaten taro root and incorporate thoroughly. Stir in the corn starch mixture until everything is well-combined. Approximately 10-15 minutes after starting, cook over Medium Low heat, stirring constantly, until the taro root thickens and becomes a pudding. Turn the heat down to a bare minimum. Mix in the purple food coloring until everything is well-combined. Afterward, transfer the mixture to a clean basin and cover it with plastic wrap to cool

Making the Dough

  1. Into a large mixing bowl, add the vegetable oil. Completely cover the interior of the bowl with oil by brushing it on. Add the heated water, active dry yeast, and 1 teaspoon sugar to a small mixing dish. Bring everything together. Allow for a 10-minute resting period, or until the yeast mixture becomes frothy. Add the all-purpose flour, 1/4 cup sugar, and salt to a large mixing bowl and mix well. Mix on Low speed for 15 seconds using the dough hook attachment. Combine the yeast mixture and milk in a mixing bowl. Add the egg, which has been lightly beaten. Toss in the butter. Mix on a low setting. Using a spatula, scrape the sides of the basin and push the dry ingredients into the middle of the bowl during the first minute. (After about 2 minutes, the dough should begin to form. ) Continue to mix for a total of 8 minutes
  2. Form the dough into a rough ball and drop it into the greased mixing bowl
  3. Repeat the process. More vegetable oil should be used to the dough. Wrap the bowl tightly with plastic wrap. Place the dough in the oven and bake for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, or until it has doubled in size. Lightly dust the work area before continuing. Transfer the dough to a work surface and sprinkle extra flour on top of it. Knead the dough for approximately 2-3 minutes.

Making Round Buns

  1. Form the dough into a log that is approximately 12 inches in length. Cut each piece into 12 equal pieces and roll each piece into a rough ball to make a ball. With order to prevent the dough from drying out, cover it in plastic wrap. To begin, take a dough ball and gently flatten it with your fingertips. Make a 3 inch circle with a rolling pin by flattening the dough. Using a cookie scoop, scoop out 1 1/2 tablespoons of taro filling and set it in the center of the cookie dough. Gather the dough around the filled ball, enclosing it. Pinch the dough together at the top of the ball, and then twist it together. Place the twisted end of the wire on the work area so that it is facing down. Using your hand, cup the ball around the ball and rotate in a circular motion for approximately 10 seconds to smooth and form the bun. Pat and spin the ball between your palms to ensure that the bun is as circular as possible. Place the buns on a large baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes. Continue to follow the same methods until all of the buns are completed. Allow for 30 minutes of resting time after covering with a moist towel.

Making Rolled Buns

  1. Cut the dough in half and flatten each half into a rectangle that is approximately 10 inches by 6 inches and 1/4 inch thick. Repeat the process with the other half. Divide the taro filling in half and distribute it over each portion of the dough, starting at the bottom. Prepare each part of dough by dipping your finger into water and dabbing it around the top edge of each section. Roll the dough into two logs by applying gentle pressure to the surface. Seal each roll by pushing down on the wet edge with a damp paper towel. Each log should be cut into six equal pieces. Make a circular bun out of each portion by patting it together. Toss the mixture onto a large baking sheet. Allow for 30 minutes of resting time after covering with a moist towel.

Making the Egg Wash

  1. Remove one half of the dough from the bowl and flatten it into a rectangle that is approximately 10 inch x 6 inch and 1/4 inch thick. Then, divide the taro filling into two equal halves and distribute them over each part of dough. Prepare each part of dough by wetting your finger and dabbing it around the top edge of each section of dough. Roll the dough into two logs by applying medium pressure to the roller. Then, using a moistened edge, push down on each roll to secure it. 6 equal pieces should be cut out of each log. Make a circular bun out of each component. Transfer to a large baking sheet and bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees. Allow for 30 minutes of resting time under a moist towel.

Serving and Storing

  1. Cut the dough in half and flatten each half into a rectangle that is approximately 10 inches by 6 inches and 1/4 inch thick. Make a halved taro filling and distribute it on each portion of dough. Using your finger, dab the top edge of each slice of dough with water. Roll the dough into two logs by applying gentle pressure. Each roll should be sealed by pushing down on the wet edge. Cut each log into six pieces that are equal in size. Form each slice into a circular bun by patting it together. Transfer to a large baking sheet and set aside. Allow for 30 minutes of resting time under a moist towel
  • This dough should be pliable and somewhat sticky to the touch. If the dough becomes too wet or too dry while mixing, add additional flour or water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and mix until the dough is no longer wet or dry. A usual occurrence is that the dough will adhere to the bottom of the mixing bowl. As long as the dough retains its shape and does not ooze, it is not too moist to bake with. It is also important not to overload the dough with flour, as this will result in a dry and heavy bun. The dough resting durations will vary depending on how hot or cold it is outside. When the air temperature is roughly 72 degrees Fahrenheit, it normally takes about 1 1/2 hours for the dough to double in size (22 C). Make use of a heated oven to expedite the procedure. Turn on the oven light or heat the oven until it is warm, then turn off the heat. When dealing with the dough and shaping it into buns, use just a little dusting of flour
  • Too much flour will make the dough tough to work with. The dough should have a modest amount of stickiness to it. Make sure not to overshape the buns. Work rapidly and haphazardly to create your buns. While they are rising in the second resting period, the buns will rise uniformly and form beautiful, round buns. The taro root filling may be prepared while the dough is resting. Optionally, prepare the taro root filling the day before and keep it refrigerated until needed. If the taro filling is difficult to spread, reheat it in the microwave for 30 seconds before using. You may use either the giant taro root or the little potato-like ones for this recipe. The starchier texture of the smaller taro roots is due to their smaller size. In order to get a smoother texture when working with smaller roots, I filter the mash after it has been mashed
  • While heating the taro root filling, simmer only until it thickens into a pudding-like consistency. Once it has cooled, it will thicken even more. In order to enjoy the buns, the taro root filling should be soft and creamy rather than firm and chunky
  • Place a baking pan filled with hot water on the lowest oven rack before baking the buns. This causes steam to be generated, which helps to keep the buns moist while baking. This technique is excellent for creating a delicate, moist feel in baked items of any kind. Keep the buns at room temperature for 1-2 days before serving. After this time, store them in the refrigerator for up to 1 week, or until they go bad. To reheat, place the bread in a toaster oven or microwave on Low power for 20-30 seconds until warmed through. Taro Buns can be stored in the freezer for up to 3 months.
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Nutritional Values Taro Buns / Banh Mi Ngot Nhan Khoai MonAmount Per Serving Taro Buns / Banh Mi Ngot Nhan Khoai Mon Calories: 192Calories from fat: 27 percent of the daily recommended intake* Fatty Acids: 3g5 percent Saturated Fatty Acids: 1g6 percent Cholesterol36mg12 percent Sodium162mg7 percent Potassium165mg5 percent Carbohydrates35g12 percent Fiber 1g4 percent Sugar 9g10 percent Protein4g8 percent Sodium162mg7 percent Potassium165mg5 percent Sodium162mg7 percent Potassium165mg5 percent Vitamin A (130 IU3) is a percentage of total vitamin A.

Calcium is 29mg and contains 0.8mg of vitamin C.

sugar, taro root, and vanilla sugar are some of the ingredients in this recipe.

corn starch and dough are also included.

Pull-Apart Marbled Taro Bread Recipe by Tasty

With their pillowy soft texture and just the right amount of sweetness, these marbled taro buns will become a staple in your morning rotation. Check out big taro root in the shop; big taro has purple-flecked flesh instead of the white flesh of little taro root, which is more common. Also, use caution while handling raw taro root, since it can cause skin irritation if not handled with gloves beforehand. Although they require a significant amount of time to prepare, these buns are well worth the effort.

  • 1 lbbig taro root(455g), peeled and cubed
  • Cold water, as needed
  • 12 teaspoonkosher salt
  • 2 tablespoonsunsalted butter
  • 13 cups sugar(65g)
  • 1 lbbig taro root(455g)
  • 1 lbbig taro
  • Bread flour (310g), plus 2 tablespoons divided, plus more for dusting
  • 2 12 cups bread flour (310g), plus 2 tablespoons divided, plus more for dusting
  • 1 / 3 cup water (80 mL)
  • 2 tablespoonsdried nonfat milk powder
  • 1 teaspoonkosher salt
  • 12 cups sugar (100g)
  • 4 tablespoonsunsalted butter, melted
  • 1 big egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespooninstant yeast
  • 2 tablespoonsdried nonfat milk powder
  • 12 cup whole milk (120 mL), warmed
  • Nonstick cooking spray, for splatter protection
  • Bread flour (310g), plus 2 tablespoons divided, plus more for dusting
  • 2 12 cups bread flour (310g), plus 2 teaspoons divided, plus more for dusting 80 milliliters (13 cup) of water 1 big egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast
  • 2 teaspoons dry nonfat milk powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 12 cups sugar (100g)
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • Heated twelfth cup whole milk (120 mL)
  • Nonstick cooking spray for frying
  1. Bread flour (310g), plus 2 tablespoons divided, plus more for dusting
  2. 2 12 cups bread flour (310g), plus 2 tablespoons divided, plus more for dusting. 1 1/3 cup water (80 mL)
  3. 2 tablespoonsdried nonfat milk powder
  4. 1 teaspoonkosher salt
  5. 12 cups sugar (100g)
  6. 4 teaspoons unsalted butter, melted heated twelfth cup whole milk (120 mL)
  7. Nonstick cooking spray for greasing
  • 1 lbbig taro root(455g), peeled and cubed
  • Cold water, as needed
  • 12 teaspoonkosher salt
  • 2 tablespoonsunsalted butter
  • 13 cups sugar(65g)
  • 1 lbbig taro root(455g)
  • 1 lbbig taro
  • Bread flour (310g), plus 2 tablespoons divided, plus more for dusting
  • 2 12 cups bread flour (310g), plus 2 tablespoons divided, plus more for dusting
  • 1 / 3 cup water (80 mL)
  • 2 tablespoonsdried nonfat milk powder
  • 1 teaspoonkosher salt
  • 12 cups sugar (100g)
  • 4 tablespoonsunsalted butter, melted
  • 1 big egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespooninstant yeast
  • 2 tablespoonsdried nonfat milk powder
  • 12 cup whole milk (120 mL), warmed
  • Nonstick cooking spray, for splatter protection
  • Bread flour (310g), plus 2 tablespoons divided, plus more for dusting
  • 2 12 cups bread flour (310g), plus 2 teaspoons divided, plus more for dusting 80 milliliters (13 cup) of water 1 big egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast
  • 2 teaspoons dry nonfat milk powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 12 cups sugar (100g)
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • Heated twelfth cup whole milk (120 mL)
  • Nonstick cooking spray for frying
  1. Keep in mind that when handling raw taro, gloves should always be worn because it might cause skin irritation. Preparing the taro paste is simple: Place the taro root in a medium-sized pot and fill with cold water by an inch and a half (2 12 cm). Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to low and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the vegetables are fork soft. Drain
  2. Transfer the taro to a food processor and pulse until smooth. Process the mixture until it is completely smooth, adding salt as needed. Transfer to a small mixing bowl and set aside to cool fully before using. To make the taro paste ahead of time, place it in an airtight container and place it in the refrigerator. Before usage, allow the product to come to room temperature. Make the milk buns by whisking together 2 tablespoons of bread flour and the water in a small saucepan over medium heat. Heat the mixture over medium heat, stirring constantly, for approximately 3 minutes, or until it begins to thicken. Remove the pan from the heat and transfer to a small mixing bowl to cool. Allow for thorough cooling. To make the dough, combine the remaining 212 cups (310 G) of ingredients in a large mixing bowl, including the bread flour, cooled flour and water paste, egg, yeast, milk powder, salt, sugar, butter, and milk. Toss the ingredients together with a rubber spatula until they form a shaggy mass, then turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 5-6 minutes, or until the dough is mostly smooth
  3. Transfer the dough to a large mixing bowl that has been lightly oiled. Remove from the oven and set aside in a warm place for approximately 90 minutes, or until nearly doubled in size
  4. To make the marbled crust, follow these steps: 12 cup (60 g) all-purpose flour, 14 teaspoon salt, 12 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon canola oil, and 2 tablespoons water are mixed together in a medium-sized mixing basin. Then turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board and work it in for 1-2 minutes, or until it’s smooth and silky. Wrap the dish in plastic wrap and let it aside for 10 minutes. Repeat the process with the remaining ingredients, this time include the purple food coloring. After the dough has rested, lay out both parts to make them as flat as possible. Assemble the layers by stacking the white dough on top of the purple dough and pressing down to seal. Roll out the dough to a 5-inch (11-cm) square, then roll the square into a tube shape with your hands. Roll to seal and stretch the roll a little. 9 identical pieces should be cut from the tube. Squeeze each piece down with your hands, spiral side up, until it is completely flat. To roll each part, use a rolling pin to form it into approximately 4-inch (10 cm) (circles. Cover the buns with a thin layer of plastic wrap until you are ready to assemble them. As soon as the milk bun dough has doubled in size, divide it into nine 3-ounce (90-gram) sections. Lightly cover the dish with plastic wrap. Take one piece and flatten it into a circle that is 4 inches (10 cm) in diameter. 2 tablespoons of taro paste should be placed in the middle. Bring the dough’s edges together and press them together with your fingertips (this will be the bottom). Repeat the procedure with the remaining dough and taro paste. Lightly brush the tops of the buns with water to seal in the moisture. Place a marbled circle over each bun and press the edges together with your hands to seal them. Prepare a 9-inch (22-cm) square baking dish by spraying it with nonstick cooking spray and lining it with parchment paper. Place the buns in the baking dish that has been prepared. Place a kitchen towel over the top and allow it rise for another hour, or until it has about doubled in height
  5. Make sure your buns are baked for 25–30 minutes, or until your finger does not leave an indentation in the dough when you push it
  6. Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). After allowing the buns to cool for 10 minutes in the pan, move them to a wire rack to finish cooling
  7. . Enjoy

Sweet Yam Taro Buns

  1. Dim Sum
  2. BaoziMantou (Buns)
  3. Sweet Buns
  4. Sweet Yam Taro Buns

A Sweet and Creamy Taro and Yam Treat

Sweet yam taro buns are delectable, physically beautiful, and packed with nutritional benefits. It is essential that the filling of taro buns be aromatic and silky in order for them to taste well. The taro puree becomes delicate and fine as the result of thorough blending. The filling is made by frying sugar and light cream over a low heat until it is sweet and smooth, with an alluring, creamy scent. Print the recipe for Purple Sweet Yam Taro Buns.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour (300 grams)
  • 7 ounces (200 grams) taro
  • 7 ounces (200 grams) sweet yam
  • 2 34 cups (300 grams) sugar

Seasonings

  • To make the dough, combine 2 heaping teaspoons (30 grams) sugar, 1 scant teaspoon (3 grams) yeast, 0.35 ounce (10 grams) light cream, and 0.35 ounce (10 milliliters) salad oil in a mixing bowl.

Please refer to the grams quantities for all ingredients and spices in order to be more precise.

Cooking Directions

  1. Yams should be peeled and washed. Put the ingredients in a blender and mix until smooth. 2/3 cup (150 milliliters) of water should be added. Blend. Remove the chunky parts using a strainer, leaving only the yam liquid behind. Make a note of the yam juice to use in step 4

How to make taro filling

  1. Taro should be peeled and washed. Slice the vegetables and cook them in a steamer. Puree the taro roots while they are still hot from the steaming process. Place all of the ingredients in a blender. Add a small amount of warm water. Smooth out the mixture into a fine paste
  2. Pour the taro paste into the pan when it has been mixed. Toss in the sugar and light cream. Continue to cook over a moderate heat until the sugar has entirely dissolved and the mixture has become somewhat dry and thick in consistency. The taro filling is seen here. Tip: Because taro is inherently sweet, it is important not to overdo the sugar or the sweetness will become overwhelming. It is possible that adding too much sugar could cause the filling to lose too much water, which will make it more difficult to form the buns.

How to make the dough

  1. Activate the yeast by adding a little amount of warm water. Pour the yeast-water solution and yam juice from step 1 on top of the all-purpose flour in a uniform layer. Toss with a few drops of salad oil. Chopsticks should be used to stir the dough in a single direction to generate a smooth surface. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and let it to ferment for approximately 2 hours, or until it has doubled in volume.

How to assemble yam taro buns

  1. Using a knife, cut the dough into pieces that are roughly 1.76 ounces (50 grams) apiece. Form the dough into balls and then flatten. Apply pressure to the dough with a rolling pin to form circular dough wrappers of the required thickness. Fill the middle of the dough wrapper with a sufficient quantity of the taro filling from step 3. Pinch the edges of the dough wrapper together using the region between your thumb and index finger, gradually closing it up. This is the sweet yam taro bun that has not been baked.

Put it all together

  1. Place a piece of oil paper or damp gauze in the bottom of a steamer basket to prevent the basket from overheating. Arrange uncooked sweet yam taro buns on top, with the openings pointing downward and plenty of room between each bun, as seen in the photo. Cover the steamer basket and let it aside for 30 minutes. Fill the steamer pot with the required amount of water. Insert a steamer basket into the container. Bring the water to a boil on a high heat setting. Reduce the heat to medium and continue to steam for approximately 20 minutes. Turn off the heat and let for roughly 3 minutes to elapse. Serve
See also:  How To Steam Bao Buns Without A Steamer

How Love of Food is Expressed in Cantonese

In the bottom of a steamer basket, place a piece of oil paper or damp gauze. Distribute a generous amount of space between each of the uncooked sweet yam and taro buns, with the openings pointing downward on top. Set aside the steamer basket for 30 minutes and then fill the steamer pot with the necessary amount of water.

Stack a steamer basket on top of the other. High heat should be used to bring the water to boil. Simmer for roughly 20 minutes at a medium heat setting. Turn off the heat and let for roughly 3 minutes to elapse before continuing. Serve;

Steamed Taro Bun Recipe

This simple steamed taro bun recipe brings out the best in the flavors of the original ingredients. If you enjoy eating taro, this is a bun that you must try at least once.

Ingredients

  • The ingredients include 500g glow-gluten flour, 100g sugar, 5g baking powder, 5g yeast, 25g bread improver, 225g water, and 5g taro oil.

Stuffing Ingredients

1. Do not place the buns too close together in the steamer since they may get sticky when they are steamed together. When using fresh fish flesh, minced ginger should be added to help eliminate the fishy flavor.

Steps

Mix low-gluten flour and baking powder. Pour on a work surface and make it as a circle. Add sugar, yeast, bread improver, water, and taro oil in the circle.
2Done5 minutes
Stir until sugar melt. Then stir into the flour powder.
3Done5 minutes
Make it into a dough and knead until smooth and tender.
4Done25 minutes
Use a plastic wrap to cover the dough and allow to rest for 20 minutes.
5Done5 minutes
Sperate the dough into 30g small doughs.
6Done5 minutes
Use a rolling pin to flatten the dough into thin bun’s skin. Set aside.
7Done5 minutes
Mince the coriander and fish meat paste. Mix well to make it as the stuffing.
8Done5 minutes
Use the bun’s skin to wrap the stuffing.
9Done5 minutes
Place into a steamer. Let the buns rest for 20 minutes. Use high heat to steam for 8 minutes. Serve.

Lucy Xue

It’s been a pleasure meeting you. I am thrilled to be able to share my love of all things salty, sweet, and savory with others. Ideally, I would like every dish we prepare to provide joy, happiness, and sustenance to our bodies.

Taro Rolls Recipe

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. Please review my disclosure policy. Taro rolls are a traditional Hawaiian dinner roll with a tropical touch. Purple bread that is somewhat sweet, airy, and fluffy. This is a simple recipe that creates a delicious side dish. If you enjoy Portuguese sweet bread, you’ll enjoy this recipe as much as I do. Tender sweet dinner rolls made with taro, a traditional Hawaiin staple meal that is cooked to perfection. The rich purple colours of this taro bun give it a stunning appearance to go along with its excellent flavor.

  • It goes wonderfully as a side dish with a wide variety of cuisines that you may like.
  • Let’s speak about the taro, the star of the show, for a moment.
  • Taro is also known as kalo in other parts of the world.
  • A bland starch-like taste may be detected.

Ingredients for this taro buns recipes

(Full recipe directions and ingredient amounts may be found at the bottom of this article in the recipe card.)

  • Flour for making bread. Bread flour has a greater protein content than regular flour and is thus ideal for baking bread. If you don’t have bread flour on hand, you may use all-purpose flour
  • Sugar. This adds a sweet touch to the bread, which helps to balance out the tastes
  • Instant yeast. Using instant yeast reduces the amount of time it takes to produce this recipe because it does not need to be dissolved in water or go through a first rise like traditional yeast. You can also use active dry yeast in this recipe
  • Nevertheless, salt is recommended. Salt brings out the tastes of the bread
  • Milk helps to keep the bread moist. This will guarantee that your yeast grows and prospers. Make certain that you use warm milk. Yeast can be killed by milk that is either too hot or too cold
  • Poi Due to the fact that every poi brand is different, you will need to alter the amount of liquid accordingly. If you are unable to locate poi, taro can be substituted. Steam or boil the potatoes, mash them, and add water until you get a paste-like consistency
  • This is the butter. Purple food coloring is used to give the bread greater rise and a crispier exterior. This is what gives it its distinctive purple tint. You may choose to omit this if you choose

How to make taro rolls?

  1. Prepare the dough by combining the flour, sugar, and yeast in a large mixing basin. Mix until everything is fully incorporated, then put aside. To the bowl of a stand mixer, add 14 cup milk, poi, egg, and butter. Mix until well combined. Using the paddle attachment, mix until everything is thoroughly incorporated. Then, using a pastry blender, blend in purple food coloring until it is all incorporated. Replace the paddle attachment with a dough hook to complete the transformation. After that, add the flour mixture in small batches. Combine until everything is well-combined. As needed, add the remaining milk mixture in little amounts at a time. This will vary greatly depending on the kind of poi used and the humidity in the air. Make the dough by kneading it: Continue mixing for 10 minutes on medium speed, or until the dough is smooth. This is a dough that is still moist. It is done when you can touch the dough with clean hands and the dough does not adhere to your fingertips
  2. This indicates that the combination is finished. Form the dough: After the dough has been well mixed, divide it into 15 equal pieces and form a ball with each piece. Each piece of dough should be rolled into a smooth ball. Allow the following to rise: Grease a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with nonstick cooking spray or butter or oil if it is not already greased. Place the dough in 5 rows of 3 on a baking sheet. Allow the dough to rise until it has doubled in size, covered with a dish towel. This will differ based on the temperature and humidity
  3. Nonetheless, Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. The rolls should be baked for 20-25 minutes, or until the tops are just beginning to brown on top. Once the dough has doubled in size, remove it from the oven. Allow to cool slightly before serving

Tips for the best taro bread

  • Add the liquid in little amounts at a time. The consistency of the poi differs from one brand to another. This method provides for more precise control of the dough’s moisture because it is done in small increments. The use of a stand mixer makes the process of creating bread considerably easier, but it is not needed for success. You may use a wooden spoon to combine the dough and then knead it by hand. Form the dough until it has a smooth top surface that is taught and smooth. A simple method for accomplishing this is to form your palm into a C and lay it over the dough. Roll the dough in a circular motion until the dough pulls itself together and becomes firm. ***A graphic representation may be found in the video***
  • Don’t try to hasten the process of ascending. The fermentation process results in a light and tasty loaf of bread. When making taro rolls, you may brush the top of the bread with a whisked egg before baking it to give it a more golden brown appearance
  • However, this is optional.

FAQs

Section by section, add the liquid. Each brand’s consistency of poi differs somewhat. A small amount at a time provides for more precise control over the moisture of the dough. Using a stand mixer to prepare bread makes the process considerably easier, but it is not needed. Use a wooden spoon to combine the dough and knead it by hand if you want to save time. Form the dough until it has a smooth top surface that is well-taught and elastic. This may be accomplished by forming your hand into a C shape and placing it over the dough.

***A graphic representation may be found in the video*** Keep the process of rising from the ground to a gentle pace.

When making taro rolls, you may brush the top of the bread with a whisked egg before baking it to give it a more golden brown color; however, this is optional.

Other great taro recipes

  • 4 cups bread flour
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 14 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 12 teaspoon salt
  • 12 cup warm milk
  • 1 cup poi
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1 teaspoon purple food coloring
  • 4 cups bread flour

Instructions

  1. Prepare the dough by combining the flour, sugar, and yeast in a large mixing basin. Mix until everything is fully incorporated, then put aside. To the bowl of a stand mixer, add 14 cup milk, poi, egg, and butter. Mix until well combined. Using the paddle attachment, mix until everything is thoroughly incorporated. Then, using a pastry blender, blend in purple food coloring until it is all incorporated. Replace the paddle attachment with a dough hook to complete the transformation. After that, add the flour mixture in small batches. Combine until everything is well-combined. As needed, add the remaining milk mixture in little amounts at a time. This will vary greatly depending on the kind of poi used and the humidity in the air. Make the dough by kneading it: Continue mixing for 10 minutes on medium speed, or until the dough is smooth. This is a dough that is still moist. It is done when you can touch the dough with clean hands and the dough does not adhere to your fingertips
  2. This indicates that the combination is finished. Form the dough: After the dough has been well mixed, divide it into 15 equal pieces and form a ball with each piece. Each piece of dough should be rolled into a smooth ball. Allow the following to rise: Grease a 9×13 baking dish with nonstick cooking spray or butter or oil if it is not already greased. Place the dough in 5 rows of 3 on a baking sheet. Allow the dough to rise until it has doubled in size, covered with a dish towel. This will differ based on the temperature and humidity
  3. Nonetheless, Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. The rolls should be baked for 20-25 minutes, or until the tops are just beginning to brown on top. Once the dough has doubled in size, remove it from the oven. Allow to cool slightly before serving

Notes

Add the liquid in little amounts at a time. The consistency of the poi differs from one brand to another. Making little additions at a time gives you greater control over the moisture of the dough in the final product. The use of a stand mixer makes the process of creating bread considerably easier, but it is not needed for success. You may use a wooden spoon to combine the dough and then knead it by hand. Form the dough until it has a smooth top surface that is taught and smooth. A simple method for accomplishing this is to form your palm into a C and lay it over the dough.

***A graphic representation may be found in the video*** Don’t try to hasten the process of ascending. The fermentation process results in a light and tasty loaf of bread. If you want the top of the taro rolls to be more golden brown, brush the top of the bread with a whisked egg before baking it.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:15 Serving Size: 1Servings per container: Calories:266 7 g of total fat 4 g of saturated fat 0 g of Trans Fat 2 g of unsaturated fat Cholesterol:29mg Sodium:131mg Carbohydrates:45g Fiber:1g Sugar:14g Protein:5g Nutritional information is not always up to date and correct. Have you tried this recipe? Please include me on social media. I’d love to see it and spread the word about it. Instagram FacebookPinterest Have you tried this recipe and enjoyed it? Please rate it on a scale of 1-5. Save this for later.

About Relle

Hello, my name is Relle, and welcome to my little corner of the internet, where I like to share all of my favorite Hawaiian recipes with all of my readers (and local ones too). A little about myself: I’m a wife, mother of two children, and nurse practitioner living in the lovely state of Hawaii. I was born and reared on the Hawaiian Islands, and I am descended from native Hawaiians. In my leisure time, I like cooking and baking, and I’ve put a collection of some of my favorite recipes here for you to enjoy as well.

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