How To Steam Pork Buns

Chinese Steamed Pork Buns

Steamed buns that are pillowy soft and stuffed with a sweet and delicious saucy pork filling. Chinese Pork Buns cooked from scratch taste just like the ones you get from the dim lunch carts. These are going to blow your head! Yum Cha on Sunday mornings in Sydney is nearly a religious rite for many people. From the middle of the morning, large groups of people swarm into big eateries, their steaming carts loaded high with dumplings and buns clanging about the room. The familiar sound of bowls being slammed onto tables, the limitless Chinese tea, and the fast, borderline nasty service are all there and correct.

Yum Cha’s courteous service is almost scary in its formality.

The etiquette for pursuing trolleys varies from restaurant to restaurant, but I’m not afraid to break the rules.

I’ll stalk trolley after trolley till I locate what I’m looking for when I’m in need of pork buns!

Plus, if you’re a pork bun fanatic like I am, you’ll save a bundle because making them at home is probably 70 to 80 percent less expensive than buying them.

When you microwave frozen pork buns for 1 minute, they’ll look and taste like they just came out of a bamboo steamer.

HOW TO MAKE PORK BUNS

Steamed pork buns are made in four processes, which are shown below.

1. THE FILLING

A simple sweet and savoury sauce is used to cover the chopped Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Siu), which is then grilled. Use either store-bought or home-made Char Siu for this recipe. When making a full-blown homemade Char Siu, allow at least 24 hours for marinating. If time is of the essence, check out our Quick Homemade Char Siu recipe in the recipe notes.

2. DOUGH FOR PORK BUNS

If you have a stand mixer, creating the dough is as simple and straightforward as making any other yeast bread or rolls. Unlike other doughs, this one is soft and elastic, making it very easy to work with. The recipe video is useful in seeing the consistency of the dough.

3. STUFF ‘EM!

No doubt, this is the portion that will take some time and practice, and I’m no Pork Bun Goddess, but I’ll try my best! However, it makes no difference. Regardless of whether you just bundle it up like a money bag and lock the filling inside, it will still taste just as nice! Although watching the recipe video is the most effective method to learn how to wrap pork buns, the following is a quick step-by-step description:

  • To avoid ending up with a giant thick wad of dough while pinching the dough together, roll out very thin circles, making the edges even thinner. Placing it on your hand and sprinkling it with Filling Pinch the dough along the edges (see 6 below) to create pleats – approximately 8 times
  • Gather the pleats together as you move around the edge, pulling them together so that you finish up closing the bun at the top (7 and 8 below)
  • Pinch the ends together and twist them together (9)

Voila! You’ve mastered the art of the pork bun!

4. Steam!

In a wok, I use a bamboo steamer set over simmering water to cook my vegetables. Any steamer will suffice, but if you want to have the most real pork bun experience possible, a bamboo steamer is recommended since it lends a delicate scent to the buns during the cooking process. They aren’t prohibitively costly, and you can purchase them at almost any Asian grocery shop. Steamed Chinese Dumplings,Shumai – Japanese Steamed Dumplings, and Chinese Steamed Fish are all delicious options!

How to build a paper liner for the bamboo steamer, which is a useful tip. First, fold the baking paper in half, align it with the center, and cut off one end (1). Next, cut little diamonds along the edge (2), unfold (3), and place it in your steamer.

ALL CREDIT TO WOKS OF LIFE

I want to be absolutely clear about who should be given credit for this recipe because it is not one that I created myself. Cooks of Life owners Judy and Bill developed this Steamed BBQ Pork Buns dish after conducting extensive study and developing it from scratch. Outstanding individuals, outstanding taste and culinary skill in addition to a very high degree of quality. I have great faith in their recipes. Judy and Bill, you have earned our respect! It’s well worth the time and work you put it.

Let’s be honest about this.

– Nagi x Nagi x Nagi x

MORE GREAT DUMPLINGS OF THE WORLD

  • Potstickers (Chinese pan-fried dumplings)
  • Gyoza (Japanese dumplings)
  • Shumai (Japanese steamed dumplings on my mother’s website, RecipeTin Japan! )
  • And a variety of other dishes. Wontons
  • A look through the Yum Cha recipe archive

WATCH HOW TO MAKE IT

Subscribe to my email and follow me on social media platforms such as Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram to stay up to speed on the newest news. Servings12Hover over the image to see the scaleRecipe video above. These are authentically similar to what you would receive at Yum Cha / Dim Sum. Soft, fluffy white buns filled with a rich sweet and savoury filling are baked to perfection. Perfect freezer staple – just microwave them from frozen and they’ll taste like like they just came out of the bamboo steamer!

Yeast Activation:

  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast powder
  • 1/4 cup / 65 mL warm water
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Dough:

  • A half cup of warm water, 4 tablespoons of sugar, 70 grams of white sugar, 2 cups of plain flour (all purpose), 1 cup of cornflour / cornstarch, 1/4 cup of vegetable oil, and 2 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder

Pork Filling:

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped escalot or white onion (Note 1)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce, regular or light (not dark)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons oyster sauce (can substitute Hoisin)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon cornflour dissolved in 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 1/2 cups Chinese Barbecue Pork, diced (Note 2)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 1 tablespoon ses

Dough:

  • Activating the yeast: In a small mixing basin, combine the yeast, sugar, and water. Mix well, then put aside for 10 minutes, or until it begins to froth. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, combine the flour, cornflour, and sugar. Add the yeast mixture, oil, and water and stir briskly to blend. On a low speed, mix for 3 minutes, or until a smooth ball of dough comes together. It should be supple and elastic, not sticky to the point where it becomes plastered all over your fingers and palms. If necessary, add a pinch of flour or a splash of water to get the desired dough consistency. Wrap it in cling wrap and set it aside in a warm, dry location for 2 hours, or until it has doubled in size. (See also Note 3) In the meantime, prepare the Filling. Remove the cling film and sprinkle the baking powder on top. Return to the stand mixer and blend on low speed for 2 minutes until smooth. Turn the dough out onto a floured work area and press it down. Lightly knead the dough to produce a smooth circular disc

Making Buns (watch video):

  • Cut the dough into four equal pieces. Take one piece and roll it into an even log, then cut it into three pieces (for a total of 12 pieces)
  • Take one piece of dough and wrap the rest in cling film or a tea towel
  • Set aside. Roll the dough into a circular 4.5″/11 cm in diameter, making the edges thinner as you roll. Place the dough in your palm and place 1 1/2 tablespoons of the Filling in the center
  • Make 8 pleats all the way around the edges. Then, one by one, bring the pleats together to form the bun’s seal. Twist the top of the twist using your fingers
  • Repeat the process with the remaining dough to produce a total of 12 cookies. Wrap the buns in cling wrap and set them aside in a warm location for 15 minutes.

Steaming:

  • Note 4: Prepare a big bamboo steamer (or other steamer) by lining it with parchment paper that has been perforated with holes. Place 6 to 8 buns on a piece of parchment paper and cover with the steamer lid. Pour about 4 cm / 1 1/2 inches of water into a wok / pot (the steamer should not come into contact with the water) and bring to a quick simmer over medium high heat
  • Place the steamer in the pan and cook for 12 minutes on high heat. Halfway through, check the water level and replenish it up if necessary. Buns are done when they bounce back when touched, and the buns have created a smooth skin on the outside. Remove the steamer from the pan and serve while still hot.

Filling:

  • In a saucepan, heat the oil over medium heat until shimmering. Cook for 2 minutes after adding the eschalots. Combine the sugar, soy sauce, oyster sauce, sesame oil, and water in a mixing bowl. Slowly add in the cornflour mixture while stirring constantly. until the mixture is smooth
  • Add the meat and mix well. Cook for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened (see video for consistency). Remove from heat and allow to cool (it thickens as it cools).

1. Eschalots are little onions that are much finer in texture than regular onions. 2. You may use whatever type of onion you like here, including brown onions and the white part of shallots, scallions, and green onions. 2. Use Chinese Barbecue Pork, either store-bought or prepared from scratch (Char Siu). Chinese BBQ Pork in a Hurry: Pork steaks should be marinated for 20 minutes in store-bought Char Siu Sauce (or a small quantity of the marinade from Homemade Char Siu). Then pan fry on medium heat or bake for 15 – 20 minutes at 180C/350F, basting often with the marinade that was set aside.

  1. 3.
  2. Run the empty dryer for 1 minute before putting the dish inside.
  3. Paper steamer liners are available in Asian markets, but I have never purchased any.
  4. Line up the end of the steamer with the center of the steamer and cut it off.
  5. Place the folded paper in the steamer.
  6. Recipe derived from thisSteamed Pork Bunsfrom Woks of Life, which has been slightly tweaked.
  7. 6.
  8. Here are a few suggestions: Chinese BBQ duck, chicken, or hog meat, or even leftover steak are all good options.
  9. Sauteed mushrooms and veggies are good vegetarian alternatives.
  10. Preparation and storage: Cook first, then chill or freeze.
  11. Freeze – microwave for 1 to 1 1/2 minutes at high power, covered with a moist paper towel, from frozen until boiling hot.

When warmed, they are fantastic freezer-friendly snacks that taste exactly like they did when fresh out of the bamboo steamer! 8. The nutritional value of a bun. Dim Sum, Pork Buns, and Yum Cha are some of the terms used to describe this dish.

LIFE OF DOZER

MOVE! I’m unable to change the channel.

Steamed Pork Buns (Char Siu Bao) Recipe

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Directions

  • The first step in preparing the filling is to rub five-spice powder evenly over the pork shoulder. Preheat a grill pan over medium-high heat until very hot. Cooking spray should be used to coat the pan. Cook the pork for 18 minutes, or until a thermometer reads 155°, flipping the meat once or twice throughout cooking. Remove the pork from the pan and set it aside for 15 minutes. Advertisement
  • Step 2: Slice the pork crosswise into thin slices, then cut the sections into strips. Pork should be placed in a medium-sized mixing basin. Stir in the onions and the next 7 ingredients (through 1/4 teaspoon salt) until everything is well-combined. Refrigerate after covering with plastic wrap. 3. To prepare the dough, in a large mixing basin, add 1 cup warm water, the sugar, and the yeast
  • Let aside for 5 minutes. In the fourth step, lightly scoop flour into dry measuring cups, and level with a knife. To the yeast mixture, add the flour, oil, and 1/4 teaspoon salt and stir until a soft dough is formed. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and press it down. Knead until the dough is smooth and elastic (about 10 minutes). Toss the dough in a large mixing basin sprayed with cooking spray, stirring to cover the whole surface. Cover and let aside in a warm (85°) area that is free of drafts for 1 hour, or until the dough has doubled in size. (Apply gentle pressure to the dough with two fingers.) If the indentation is still there, the dough has risen sufficiently.) Step 5: Punch the dough down and let it sit for 5 minutes. Make a clean area for the dough to rest on and knead in the baking powder. After allowing dough to rest for 5 minutes, proceed to Step 6 and divide it into 10 equal sections, rolling each into a ball. Make 5-inch circles out of each dough ball, working with one at a time (covering the remaining dough balls to prevent them from drying out). 1/4 cup filling should be placed in the center of the dough circle. Bring the edges up to cover the filling and bring them together at the top. Twist the end of the pinch to seal it shut. To make more dough balls and filling, follow the same technique as described above. 7. Arrange 5 buns, seam side down, 1 inch apart, on each layer of a 2-tiered bamboo steamer, one bun in each tier of the steamer. Stack the layers and cover with the lid. Then fill a big pan half-full with water until the water is one inch deep
  • Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Place the steamer in the pan and steam for 15 minutes, or until the puff and set is achieved. Allow for 10 minutes of cooling time before serving.

Chef’s Notes

Red chili peppers, cilantro, or jalapenos can be used to increase the spiciness of the dish. Cucumbers, cut into little cubes, lend a refreshing crunch to this traditional Asian dish. Hint: The beauty of this recipe is that you don’t have to limit yourself to only using pork products. Make a vegetable, bean, or even seafood bun to go with it.

Nutrition Facts

Per serving: 259 calories; calories from fat 21 percent; fat 6.1 grams; saturated fat 0.9 grams; mono fat 3.2 grams; poly fat 1.5 grams; protein 14.3 grams; carbs 35.7 grams; fiber 1.6 grams; cholesterol 27 milligrams; iron 2.9 milligrams; sodium 343 milligrams; calcium 54 milligrams;

How to Steam Buns Without a Bamboo Steamer

After more than a year on the market, our Bao Bun Kits have quickly established themselves as one of our most popular goods. However, we are frequently asked how to steam bao buns without the use of a bamboo steamer, and the answer is as follows: Given that a bamboo steamer isn’t something that everyone has in their kitchen, we’ve produced a blog article to provide some additional options to using a bamboo steamer so that you may continue to enjoy our Bao Bun Kits. We will all be pleased whether you use one of our School of Wok Bamboo Steamers or a homemade creative steamer to steam your steamed bao buns.

Even while it generates a little amount of condensation, the vast majority of it is absorbed by the steam basket itself, ensuring that it does not drop down and make your bao buns soggy (and no one like a wet bao bun!) This is exactly what we hope to do with our improvised things as well!

Recommendation 1: Metal Pan Steamer

Certain issues can develop when using a metal steamer with a glass or metal cover, since the condensation can condense and fall back down onto the bao, causing it to get soggy. Follow the methods outlined below to combat this:

  • Greaseproof paper should be used to line the metal steamer, since this will protect it. Do not overfill the container with water. Avoid letting your bao come into contact with the sides of the metal steamer, since the sides of the metal steamer might become rather wet. Using a clean tea towel, cover the pan to absorb any condensation, then lay the lid on top

Recommendation 2: Table Top Steamer

We may also use a standard tabletop steamer to do this (one usually used for vegetables). Given that this will typically accumulate a significant amount of steam, you will need to follow the same procedure as with the metal pan steamer.

  • Additionally, a classic tabletop steamer can be utilized (one usually used for vegetables). Due to the fact that this collects a significant amount of steam, you will need to follow the same procedure as with the metal pan steamer.

Recommendation 3: 1 bowl, 1 plate and a wok

There is one more option, though, if you don’t have access to a steamer at all. This will allow you to be digging into some fluffy steamed bao buns in no time. Option 3 is a straightforward and uncomplicated dish, as is recommendation 2.

  • Place a little quantity of water in a wok and a small bowl on top of the wok
  • Cook until the water is boiling. Place a plate on top of the bowl and line it with greaseproof paper (you can also use a big saucepan if you want to be more creative). Bring the water to a rolling boil. Make a greaseproof paper sheet and place the baos on it
  • Put a tall lid on the wok, or a flat cover on the saucepan if you’re using one of them.
See also:  Where Can I Buy Mcgriddle Buns

Are you looking for a WokWok Lid that fits your needs? Here’s where you may see our selection: www.schoolofwok.co.uk/shop/woks Cooking time for all of the ways listed above is 8 minutes. The original bamboo basket will, without a doubt, provide the fluffiest Bao Buns with the least amount of condensation, but any of the options described above will also work and are completely acceptable alternatives. To make the most of your Bao Bun Kit (if you don’t have a bamboo steamer on hand), try one of the recipes listed above and report back to us on how it turned out for you.

How to Make Steamed Buns

Watch this video to learn about the three different ways to steam bao buns:

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Have you been influenced by our recipes and cooking tips? Why not have a look at our selections below? With anything from a bamboo steamer to bao bun kits, we offer everything you need to become a professional chef!

Chinese Steamed Pork Buns (包子 – Baozi)

Everyone has a few go-to items in their freezer, such as a pint of ice cream, a box of waffles, or a bag of frozen peas, among other things. The freezer mainstays that I can’t live without are frozen rice, frozen man-tou, frozen dumplings, and finally, some form of savory bun, such as these steamed pork buns (baozi, which is Chinese for “steamed buns”). They are my go-to option for emergency meals! With these ingredients on hand, I’m never more than 30 minutes away from a filling supper that’s also quick and easy to prepare.

Pleating Buns: Not Actually Required!

Because of the pleating and folding steps, many people are intimidated by the prospect of producing their own steamed buns from the ground up. Although it takes some expertise, you can fully eliminate the pleating by simply sealing the top of the bun tightly and turning it over. By placing the seam side down and the smooth side up, you may create an elegant bun without having to do any work. I’d like to mention something completely unrelated: I’ve noticed that savory buns are typically pleated, but sweet buns are typically turned upside down to have a smooth top, such as my steamed custard buns.

An Important Tip for Sealing Steamed Buns

You should make sure your hands are fully dry before beginning to create the buns, and avoid getting any liquids from the filling on your hands or the exterior of the dough near where the buns are going to be closed. It will be nearly hard to seal the buns as a result of this.

Something to Consider: Grinding Meat for the Filling

Ground beef is called for in this dish. While you could absolutely purchase ground pork from your local grocery store, I have discovered the key to making a great steamed bun from scratch. It is imperative that you take the time to hand-chop the meat using a cutting board, cleaver (or other heavy knife), and our particular method demonstrated in the video below to get the best texture and flavor. I know, I know, I’m also guilty of being a slacker and occasionally purchasing pre-ground pork from the grocery.

You should give it a shot if you’re feeling up to it.

Steamed Pork Buns (Baozi): Recipe Instructions

To make the dough, combine the yeast and sugar in a large mixing basin or a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment and whisk until thoroughly dissolved. Allow about 10-15 minutes for the yeast to get active and bubble up before using. Knead the dough for about 15 minutes, adding in the flour 12 cup at a time. Make the necessary adjustments to the final 12 cup of flour. A soft dough should be used, not one that is sticky nor one that is overly stiff. Form the dough into a ball once it has been evened out and smoothed down.

In a warm spot, cover it with a moist kitchen towel and allow it to proof for one hour before using. (If you’re kneading the dough by hand, keep going until it’s as smooth as a baby’s butt!) Make the filling while the dough is rising.

Make the filling:

Stir 3 tablespoons water into the ground beef in a large mixing basin until it is well mixed. Preheat the wok or a cast iron pan until it begins to softly smoke, about 30 seconds. Combine 3 tablespoons oil with the minced ginger and chopped onion in a large mixing bowl. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the onions are tender. Stir in the ground pork until it is well cooked, breaking up any big lumps that may have formed. No need to brown or crisp the meat; simply cook until all of the pork is pale and opaque throughout the flesh.

Stir everything together until everything is well-combined while the heat is turned up to high.

To cook out any residual liquid, continue cooking for a few of minutes after that.

Remove the filling from the heat and set it aside to cool completely.

Assemble the baozi (buns):

Following the completion of the proving process, the dough should have the following appearance: Turn it out onto a clean surface that has been lightly coated with flour. Knead for 2 minutes to remove any air pockets that may have formed. Using a scale, weigh and divide the dough into 20 equal portions (each should weigh about 48g-50g). Make a series of little dough balls and roll them with a rolling pin from the perimeter into the center, without rolling the middle of the dough at all. With the dough flattened into a circular circle with a thinner perimeter and a thicker core, the final product should look like this: The ratio of thickness differences should be around 1:2.

  • Initially, you can use a lower quantity of filler until you get the hang of the folding and pleating technique.
  • During the folding process, your aim is to make it all the way around the circle, until you’ve sealed it at the top.
  • Check out our Carrot Ginger Pork Buns recipe and then scroll down to see a video of me folding a bun like this in action so you can get a feel for how it’s done in real time.
  • Continue until all of the pieces are put together.
  • If you don’t want to pleat the buns at all, simply pinch the corners of the dough together around the filling and pinch to seal the buns together.

Then just flip the buns seam side down, cover with plastic wrap, and let them prove for 15 minutes more. Check out our steamed custard bun post for a more in-depth demonstration (as well as a video) on how to do this.

To steam:

I used a bamboo steamer with three levels of steaming. You can use any steaming appliance that you are accustomed to using (refer to our post onhow to steam foodwith a bamboo steamer, metal steamer or even without special equipment). Just keep in mind that boiling water should never come into direct contact with the buns while they are steaming. Avoid sticking by spreading oil over the steaming surface or by using a nonstick surface such as napa cabbage leaves or parchment paper to prevent the surface from adhering.

  • The surface on which the buns are placed should be porous rather than solid (like a plate).
  • There should be some sort of aeration taking place.
  • Start with cold water and crank the heat up to medium while the buns are still in the steaming basket.
  • After 15 minutes, remove the pan from the heat but leave the lid on.
  • In the event that you forget to do this step, the buns will collapse.

To store (if you have any leftovers):

Using an airtight container, store the steaming pork buns when they have totally cooled to room temperature. They can be stored in the refrigerator or frozen. Of course, the best way to enjoy steamed pork buns is to eat them immediately!

To reheat:

Simply microwave the buns for 1-2 minutes after they have been removed from the refrigerator. Alternatively, re-steam them for 5 minutes until they are hot. While it is not necessary to defrost frozen buns, it is recommended that you do so before reheating them. Simply steam them for 8 minutes on a medium heat. Prep:3hours Cook:20minutes Total:3hours20minutes

For the dough:

  • 4 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast, or more exactly 1.6 teaspoons (it’s recommended to use weight measures rather than volume measurements)
  • 5 g active dry yeast 8 g granulated sugar (approximately 2 tablespoons)
  • 1 1/2 cups lukewarm water (355 mL)
  • 580gallon all-purpose flour (about 5 cups, with extra for kneading and rolling)
  • 1 1/2 cups lukewarm water (355 mL)

For the filling:

  • 700gground pork (about 1 1/2 pounds
  • Can substitute ground chicken or beef)
  • 3tablespoonswater(45 ml)
  • 3tablespoonsvegetable oil(45 ml)
  • 2tablespoonsginger(about 20g, minced)
  • 1large onion(about 200g, minced)
  • 2tablespoonsShaoxing wine(30 ml
  • Can substitute any other Chinese rice wine or dry cooking sherry)
  • 1tablespoonsweet bean sauce(can substitute hois

To make the dough:

  • To make the dough, combine the yeast and sugar in a large mixing basin or a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook attachment and whisk until thoroughly dissolved. Wait 10-15 minutes for the yeast to get active and begin to froth up before using. Knead the dough for about 15 minutes, adding in the flour 12 cup at a time. Make the necessary adjustments to the final 12 cup of flour. A soft dough should be used, not one that is sticky nor one that is overly stiff. Form the dough into a ball once it has been evened out and smoothed down. In a warm spot, cover it with a moist kitchen towel and allow it to proof for one hour before using. (If you’re kneading the dough by hand, keep going until it’s as smooth as a baby’s butt!) Make the filling while the dough is rising.

To make the filling:

  • Stir 3 tablespoons water into the ground beef in a large mixing bowl until well combined
  • Now heat a wok or a cast iron skillet over medium heat until it begins to smoke slightly. Combine 3 tablespoons oil with the minced ginger and chopped onion in a large mixing bowl. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the onions are tender. Stir in the ground pork until it is well cooked, breaking up any big lumps that may have formed. Cook until all of the pork is pale and opaque-there is no need to brown or crisp the meat at this point. To make the sauce, combine the wine, dark soy sauce, sweet bean sauce, ground bean sauce, oyster sauce, sugar, white pepper, and sesame oil in a large mixing bowl. Stir everything together until everything is well-combined while the heat is turned up to high. Taste the filling and make any necessary adjustments to the seasoning. To cook out any residual liquid, continue cooking for a few of minutes after that. Stir in the cornstarch and water combination, allowing the mixture to boil for 30 seconds to a minute before removing from the heat. Remove the filling from the heat and set it aside to cool completely. After the filling has cooled, fold in the scallions, which have been chopped.

To assemble the baozi (buns):

  • After the dough has done proving, turn it out onto a floured surface that has been sprinkled with a light layer of flour. Knead for 2 minutes to remove any air pockets that may have formed. Weigh the dough and divide it into 20 equal pieces (each piece should weigh around 48g-50g)
  • Make a series of little dough balls and roll them with a rolling pin from the perimeter into the center, without rolling the middle of the dough at all. With the dough flattened into a circular circle with a thinner perimeter and a thicker core, the final product should look like this: The ratio of thickness differences should be around 1:2. Fill the middle of the triangle with some filling
  • You may start with a lesser quantity of filling until you get the hang of the folding/pleating technique. Fold the buns with one hand holding the skin and filling while the other pleats the edges of the dough disk, creating the appearance of an accordion. During the folding process, your aim is to make it all the way around the circle, until you’ve sealed it at the top. You’ll be folding around 10-15 times. Placing the buns on a tiny piece of parchment paper and placing it immediately on your steaming rack can help them steam more evenly. Continue until all of the pieces are put together. Allow the buns to prove (covered) for a further 15 minutes before steaming. If you choose not to pleat the buns, just squeeze the corners of the dough around the filling and pinch to seal the edges securely. Then just turn the buns seam side down, cover them, and let them to proof for 15 minutes
  • To finish

To steam:

  • Start with cold water and crank the heat up to medium while the buns are still in the steaming basket. Set a timer for 15 minutes
  • After 15 minutes, turn off the heat but leave the lid on the pan. Allow the buns to “rest” for 5 minutes before removing them from the pan. In the event that this step is skipped, the buns will collapse

To store leftovers and reheat:

  • Start with cold water and a medium heat setting in the steamer with the buns inside. Set a timer for 15 minutes
  • After 15 minutes, turn off the heat but leave the lid on the pan. a After five minutes, remove the buns from the oven and set them aside to cool. If you forget to do this step, the buns will collapse on you.

This recipe yields 20 buns. The nutritional information is for one bun. I used a bamboo steamer with two levels for this recipe. You can use any steaming appliance that you are accustomed to using (refer to our post onhow to steam foodwith a bamboo steamer, metal steamer or even without special equipment). Just keep in mind that boiling water should never come into direct contact with the buns while they are steaming. Avoid sticking by spreading oil over the steaming surface or by using a nonstick surface such as napa cabbage leaves or parchment paper to prevent the surface from adhering.

The surface on which the buns are placed should be porous rather than solid (like a plate).

There should be some sort of aeration taking place.

Calories: 232 kilocalories (12 percent ) 24 g of carbohydrate (8 percent ) 9 g of protein (18 percent ) 10 g of fat (15 percent ) 5 g of saturated fat (25 percent ) 25 milligrams of cholesterol (8 percent ) Sodium: 179 milligrams (7 percent ) Potassium: 152 milligrams (4 percent ) 1 gram of dietary fiber (4 percent ) 1 gram of sugar (1 percent ) Vitamin A (i.u.): 18 IU 1 milligram of vitamin C (1 percent ) Calcium: 12 milligrams (1 percent ) 2 milligrams of iron (11 percent )

nutritional info disclaimer

TheWoksofLife.com is written and created only for the purpose of providing information. While we make every effort to give nutritional information to our readers as a general guideline, we are not professional nutritionists, and the figures supplied should be regarded as educated guesses. The nutritional information in any dish will vary depending on a variety of factors such as the brand of food purchased, natural variances in fresh ingredients, and so on. In addition, different online calculators produce varying answers based on their data sources.

Steamed pork buns

Servings:-6+

500 g ground pork
250 g flour
130 ml water
50 g scallions
2 tsp salt
20 g fresh yeast
15 g ginger
20 ml oyster sauce
10 g white pepper
10 g five-spice powder
10 ml light soy sauce
10 ml dark soy sauce
10 ml sesame oil
flour, for dusting

Utensils

  • Preparation tools: measuring cup, big mixing bowl, spoons, chopping board, knife
  • Large saucepan
  • Rolling pin
  • Steam basket

How-To Videos

Calories315Protein30 gFat4 gCarbohydrates40 g

Step 1/4

  • Make a dough by dissolving yeast in warm water and adding flour until it comes together. Set alone for approximately 2 hours to allow the muscles to recover.
See also:  How To Do Alien Buns

Step 2/4

  • The following ingredients: 500 gground pork
  • 50 gscallions
  • 15 gginger
  • 2 tspsalt
  • 10 gwhite pepper
  • 10 gfive-spice powder
  • 10 mllight soy sauce
  • 10 mldark soy sauce
  • 20 mloyster sauce
  • 10 mlsesame oil
  • 500 g ground pork
  • Scallions and ginger should be finely sliced and finely chopped. In a separate mixing bowl, combine the pork, scallions, ginger, salt, white pepper, five-spice powder, light soy sauce, dark soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sesame oil. Mix well. If necessary, a small amount of water can be added to loosen the mixture. Stir everything up thoroughly and put it aside

Step 3/4

  • Prepare a big saucepan of water by bringing it to a boil. Roll the dough into a log form and cut it into 15 equal pieces using a sharp knife. Dust the work surface with flour, then spread out the pieces of dough into equal-sized circles with a rolling pin, turning the dough as you roll it to achieve a uniform thickness throughout. Place a tablespoon of the pork filling in the center of each dough round and carefully pull and press the corners together to form a tight seal. Repeat with the remaining dough circles. Set aside for 20 minutes to let the steam to build

Step 4/4

  • In a steam basket set over boiling water, steam the buns for about 15 minutes, or until they are cooked through. Allow to cool before serving

How To Make Instant Pot Chinese Steamed Buns

Use your Instant Pot as a steamer to achieve the finest results when making soft and fluffy Chinese steamed buns. You will be pleasantly pleased at how simple it is. Chinese Steamed Buns made in the Instant Pot After many, many rounds of steamed buns (I’m talking many, many rounds! ), I was able to get soft and fluffy steamed buns that are consistently smooth and uniform in texture. I’ve usually steamed the buns in a real food steamer, but this time I wanted to see if I could get away with using an Instant Pot as a steamer to cook the buns instead.

WHY INSTANT POT STEAMED BUNS

The Instant Pot may be found in practically every household. Many individuals in the United States and Canada possess Instant Pot electric pressure cookers, which are equipped with a variety of functionalities. Many folks may not be in possession of a food steamer. Consequently, the good news is that you can steam the buns in your Instant Pot!

WHICH FUNCTION TO USE?

Previously, I utilized the “STEAM” and “PRESSURE COOKER” features built inside the Instant Pot to steam the buns. Over time, I realized that utilizing the steam or pressure cooker capabilities to steam the buns did not always result in a consistent steaming result. Sometimes it felt like the pressure wasn’t enough to cook the buns, and I ended up with some dense buns, despite the fact that the buns were delightfully puffy and hadn’t been over-proofed in the beginning. I came to the conclusion that I needed to standardize everything and employ a tool that would produce consistent results.

The setup is quite similar to that of a conventional stovetop steaming session.

BEST MATERIAL TO USE TO STEAM/PRESSURE COOK STEAMED BUNS IN INSTANT POT

1.A basket made of bamboo They thoroughly steam the buns before serving them. The holes/ventilation at the bottom of the basket allow the steamed buns to cook evenly across the whole basket. It also imparts a little bamboo scent to the steamed buns when they are steaming.

2.Steaming rack made of metal If you are unable to locate a bamboo basket, you may use a metal steaming rack, which has several holes and ventilation at the bottom of the rack, for the purpose of steaming. This is necessary in order to properly bake the buns.

HOW TO USE INSTANT POT TO STEAM CHINESE STEAMED BUNS (SAUTE MODE)

1. Fill the inner pot of the Instant Pot with 3 cups of water and set aside. It takes this much to build up adequate pressure and to boil constantly until the steamed buns are completely cooked2. Instead, I use a heat-resistant bowl. Use the steaming basket instead of the metal trivet that comes with IP since the trivet is too low and the steaming basket will be splattered by the boiling water during steaming, resulting in bruised steamed buns3. Afterwards, I add a bamboo basket or a stainless steel steamer basket on top of it.

  1. Immediately after the water has come to a boil, gently arrange the buns on the steaming basket; I can only fit around 3 to 4 buns per steaming basket depending on their size.
  2. Clean a kitchen cloth and drape it over the inner pot (as shown in the photo below and the video).
  3. After that, place the IP cover on top.
  4. This is perfectly acceptable.
  5. Steam buns for 5 minutes if they are tiny to medium in size.
  6. When it’s finished steaming, hit the “CANCEL” button.
  7. Transfer the steamed buns to a cooling rack and allow them to cool fully before serving.

Fill the inner pot with 1-2 cups of water, or as needed, to steam the next batch of vegetables.

It shouldn’t take long.

6.

Large buns with no raw meat filling take approximately 8 minutes to bake.

You must set your own timer using your phone or any other digital timer that you have.

Congratulations!

HOW TO STORE STEAMED BUNS

1. Allow the buns that have previously been steamed to cool fully before continuing. They will solidify, but they will not be entirely frozen, so place them on a baking sheet so that they do not touch one another.

3. Place the entire baking sheet in the freezer for approximately 1 hour3. Afterwards, place them in a freezer bag so that they do not attach to each other anymore. Try not to stay for longer than a month at a time.

HOW TO REHEAT FROZEN STEAMED BUNS WITH INSTANT POT

1. It is not required to defrost the steamed buns before using them. 2. Fill the inner pot of the Instant Pot with approximately 1 cup of water. 3. Insert a metal trivet into the space. Place a bamboo basket or a dish on the table. 4. Place the frozen steamed buns on top of the buns. 5. Replace the cover. Set the steam release valve to the “sealing” position. Select “steam” or “pressure cooker” from the drop-down menu. Selecting “steam” will need you to set a timer for 5 minutes. If you are using the “pressure cooker” option, set the timer for 2 minutes.

Take pleasure in the delicious steamed buns.

DID YOU MAKE THIS INSTANT POT CHINESE STEAMED BUNS RECIPE?

I love it when you guys take a picture and tag me on Instagram to show me what you’ve created. Simply tag me on Instagram with the hashtags @WhatToCookTodayWhatToCookToday and I’ll be sure to pop by and have a look in person! * The recipe was last updated in December of this year. It has been updated on October 20, 2020 with a new cooking method that uses the Instant Pot’s SAUTE mode rather than the STEAMER or PRESSURE COOKER modes. Please see the updated video for more information. The consequences of the improvisation are predictable and repeatable.

*

How To Make Instant Pot Chinese Steamed Buns

  • Preparation Time: 40 minutes Cooking Time: 20 minutes Time required: 1 hourServings: 8 mini steamed buns

Ingredients

  • Yeast (instant) (gr) Approximately 1/2+ 1/8 teaspoon see notes 1
  • 30gr sugar (about 2 tablespoons sugar, more or less to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 14 tablespoons salt Start with 80 mL of chilled milk or water (about 6 tablespoons). You will require additional supplies.

Instructions

  • In a large mixing basin, combine the flour mixture (either option 1 or 2), instant yeast, and sugar until well combined. If you are using a stand mixer, put a dough hook to the end of the machine. Pour in some cold milk or water. Cooking oil should be added. If the dough is still too dry, you may need to add a little extra milk or water. Pour in extra teaspoon by teaspoon until the dough comes together, then knead for a further 10-12 minutes, or until the dough is extremely elastic and smooth.

Prepare the dough by hands:

  • Into a large mixing basin, combine the flour mixture (either option 1 or 2), instant yeast, and sugar. Make use of the dough hook attachment if you are using a stand mixer. Fill the rest of the cup with cold milk or water. Cooking oil should be added at this point. If the dough is still a little dry, you may need to add extra milk or water. Pour in extra teaspoon by teaspoon until the dough comes together, then knead for a further 10-12 minutes, or until the dough is extremely stretchable and smooth

Rest the dough:

  • Refrigerate for 15 minutes after wrapping the dough in plastic wrap. Form the dough into a ball. At this stage, there will be no rising of the dough. The purpose of this step is to relax the gluten so that you can roll and wrap the dough more easily later on.

Wrapping:

  • Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set it aside for 15 minutes before forming it into a ball. Until this stage, the dough will not rise. To relax the gluten, perform this step first before rolling and wrapping the dough later on.

Proofing:

  • Cover with a clean towel and let aside for approximately 15 minutes to proof. Allowing the dough to rise at room temperature is recommended. To prove the buns in your oven if it is cold outside, you may use the “bread proof” option on your oven or simply turn on your oven to the lowest temperature and turn it off, then set the buns in there to proof for 15 minutes after they have been formed. At room temperature, this might take anything from 30 minutes to an hour. However, don’t simply follow the clock. If you gently press down on the dough with your finger, it will leave an indentation but will slowly spring back to its original shape. If you gently press down on the dough with your thumb, it will leave an indentation but will slowly spring back to its original shape. This dough has been meticulously proofed. If it bounces back immediately, it will need to be proofed for a little longer. If the dough does not spring back after being stretched, you have overproofed it.

Use Instant Pot “SAUTE” mode (highly recommend this method):

  • 3 cups of water should be added to the inner pot of the Instant Pot. Because the metal trivet that comes with IP is set too low, the steaming basket will be splashed by the hot water during steaming, which would cause the steamed buns to get bruised. Instead, I use a heat-proof bowl to steam the buns. Afterwards, I put a bamboo basket or a stainless steel steamer basket on top of it. To bring the water to a boil, select “SAUTE” from the menu bar. Immediately after the water comes to a boil, gently insert buns in the steaming basket
  • I can only fit about 3 in there. To achieve the greatest results, I recommend steaming one rack at a time because the buns will expand throughout the steaming process. Clean a kitchen cloth and drape it over the inner pot (as shown in the photo and video). Steamed buns are less likely to get wet due to the lack of condensation. After that, place the IP cover on top. Due to the towel, we are unable to secure the lid, but it is sufficient for covering and ensuring there is just enough pressure to fry the buns. This is perfectly acceptable. Because the lid is not securely fastened, there will be steam coming out of the IP
  • Don’t be alarmed, this is very normal. STEAMING TIME (for the sake of illustration): Steaming time for small to medium-sized buns with no raw meat filling is 5 minutes. Large buns with no raw meat filling take approximately 8 minutes to bake. If the buns have raw meat filling, steam them for 8-10 minutes for small-medium buns and 15 minutes for big buns until they are soft. You must use your phone or any digital timer to set your own timer
  • After the steaming process is complete, push the “CANCEL” button. Remove the lid and carefully lift the towel out of the container. Transfer the steamed buns to a cooling rack and allow them to cool fully before serving. This also helps to keep the bottoms of the steamed buns from becoming soggy
  • Nevertheless, Fill the inner pot with 1-2 cups of water, or as needed, to steam the next set of vegetables. To bring it back to a boil, simply press the saute button one more. It shouldn’t take long. Then repeat the procedure once more.

Use the Instant Pot “Steam” mode (result not consistent):

  • 1 cup of water should be added to the inner pot of the Instant Pot. Insert a metal trivet into the space. Use a bamboo steamer basket or a stainless steel steamer basket for this. A plate should not be used since the material is too thick and the buns will not be cooked correctly as a result. It’s preferable to use a pan with holes or ventilation at the bottom so that the steamed buns can properly cook through the steam. Place it on top of the trivet to protect it. Place three buns in the basket, leaving approximately a half-inch of space between each bun. It will be necessary to steam the vegetables in three batches. Close the lid on the jar. Set the steam release valve to the “sealing” position. Set the steamer to “high pressure” by pressing the “Steamer” button. The pressure level may be adjusted by pressing and holding the +/- button. To make mini buns, set your timer for 3 minutes. For bigger buns, allow approximately 5 minutes. Using the timer, set the timer for 8 minutes if the filling contains raw meat. Make certain that the pressure is set to high. When they are finished cooking, immediately release the pressure. Carefully take the steamed buns from the pan and place them on a cooling rack to allow them to cool completely before continuing with the second batch of buns. It may be essential to replenish the water in the inner pot. Place the remaining proofed buns in a basket and switch the steam release valve back to the “sealing” position. Repeat the process with the remaining proofed buns. This time, it will begin to pressurize nearly instantly

Use Instant Pot Pressure Cooker mode (result not consistent):

  • 1 cup of water should be added to the inner pot of the Instant Pot. Insert a metal trivet into the space. Use a bamboo steamer basket or a stainless steel steamer basket for this. A plate should not be used since the material is too thick and the buns will not be cooked correctly as a result. It is preferable to use a steamer with holes or ventilation at the bottom so that the steamed buns can properly cook. Place a basket or rack on top of the trivet to keep it from sliding around. Place three buns on a baking sheet, leaving approximately a 1/2-inch gap between them. It will be necessary to steam the vegetables in three batches. Close the lid on the jar. Set the steam release valve to the “Sealing” position. Make sure the “high pressure” setting is selected under “Pressure Cooker.” The pressure level may be adjusted by pressing and holding the +/- button. Set the timer for one minute on your clock. Set the timer for 4 minutes if the filling contains raw meat. It will take around 1-2 minutes to pressurize the system. When it’s finished cooking, quickly release the pressure. Carefully open the lid and transfer the steamed buns to a cooling rack to allow them to cool completely. This is necessary to ensure that the bottoms of the steamed buns do not become soggy. Continually process the second batch of a product. You shouldn’t have to replenish your water bottle at all. Place the remaining proofed buns in a basket and shut the lid again, turning the steam release valve back to “sealing” and repeating the procedure.

Notes

  1. If you want to use active dried yeast, be sure to rehydrate it in water or milk with 1 teaspoon of sugar before using it. About 10 minutes later, it will have completely dissolved and become frothy. It is possible that your yeast is no longer viable. After you’ve made the dough, you may put in the remaining sugar. You may also eliminate the wheat starch/corn starch and substitute all of the all-purpose flour and cornstarch/wheat starch with all cake flour or pre-mixed Hongkong/Vietnamese bao flour and leave out the wheat starch/corn starch altogether.
See also:  How Are Hamburger Buns Made

When using active dry yeast, be sure to rehydrate it in water or milk with 1 teaspoon of sugar before using it again. About 10 minutes later, it will have disintegrated and become frothy. It is not good yeast if this is not the case! After you’ve made the dough, you may add the remainder of the sugar; Additionally, you may skip the wheat starch/corn starch altogether and use cake flour or pre-mixed Hongkong/Vietnamese bao flour in place of the all-purpose flour and cornstarch/wheat starch quantity.

Marvellina

When using active dry yeast, be sure to rehydrate it in water or milk with 1 teaspoon of sugar before using it. It will dissolve and become foamy in around 10 minutes. It is not excellent yeast if this is not the case. You can add the remaining sugar to the dough at a later time. You may also eliminate the wheat starch/corn starch and use all cake flour instead of the all-purpose flour and cornstarch/wheat starch amounts.

Nikuman (Steamed Pork Buns) 肉まん

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. For more information, please see my disclosure policy. As an Amazon Associate, I receive money when people make qualifying purchases via my links. The recipe I’m sharing today is for Nikuman, Japanese steamed buns stuffed with tasty pork, shiitake mushrooms, cabbage, and green onions, which I’ll show you how to prepare in the following video. It’s the greatest type of savory snack to have on hand. Do you have a favorite dish that brings back a specific memory from your past?

Nikuman(), commonly known as Japanese-style Steamed Pork Bun, was not only my favorite winter food, but it was also a nostalgic flavor of my childhood.

By the way, convenience stores in Japan not only sell snacks and beverages, but also a bewildering selection of other things, much like a little supermarket. If you’re ever in Japan, there’s one location you should absolutely stop by and look around — it’s actually a “convenience” shop.

Watch How To Make Nikuman (Steamed Pork Buns)

Learn how to cook Nikuman (Japanese Steamed Pork Buns) at home with this instructional video! Served in delicate fluffy buns, this dish is stuffed with tender juicy pork, shiitake mushrooms, cabbage, and scallions.

What isNikuman(肉まん)?

It is also known asChka Man in Japan. Nikuman is the Japanese name for the Chinese dish baozi (,), which is also known asChka Man in Japanese. Traditionally, steamed buns are constructed of a flour dough that is then filled with meat and other ingredients. These individuals are referred to as Buta Man () in western Japan, which includes Osaka. The savory buns are normally steamed inside a bamboo steamer, and they are at their finest when they are served fresh and fluffy immediately from the steamer.

A variety of hot steamed chka man are available in convenience shops around Japan throughout the winter months, including Nikuman, Kare–man (curry taste), An–man (with red bean paste), and Pizza–man (pizza flavor).

As a tiny child, I recall my mother saying something similar.

Homemade Nikuman

My mother used to buy pre-packaged steamed buns from the grocery store, and they were, as far as I recall, rather tasty. My high school friend’s house for lunch years ago convinced me that this dish was something we could all create at home. I had no idea it was possible! She prepared handmade nikuman for us, and I was particularly struck by the fact that she cooked the pig buns herself. To my amazement, she informed me that they are quite simple to prepare. Because they were freshly baked, the buns were really delicious, and everyone enjoyed them.

Considering that you can buy pre-packaged steamed buns at the grocery store, you might ask if it’s really worth your time to cook them yourself.

Why Make Nikuman at Home:

  • Healthier– Prepackaged steamed buns are more likely to have additions or substances that are less than desirable. It’s a whole different experience when you prepare the buns from scratch. Customization– Don’t eat pork? No problem. Then for the fillings, you may use any ingredients you choose. Vegetarian or vegan options are available. These steamed buns are made specifically for you! I prefer to make them in two sizes: large ones for adults and little ones (such as the one featured in today’s recipe) for children. An accessible recipe– I was overjoyed when I found how simple it was to create my own steamed buns from scratch. Watch my video and then follow the step-by-step directions to complete the project. When you try the recipe, you’ll realize how simple and uncomplicated it is. Enjoy a delectable and refreshing taste– There is nothing better than eating food that has been freshly prepared in your own home. Steamed buns are without a doubt one of those foods. These nikuman have a wonderful, fresh flavor and are really filling. Freezer-friendly– Leftovers may be stored in the freezer and warmed quickly for subsequent use.

Making these steamed buns does present a few minor difficulties, but nothing too difficult to deter anybody from giving the dish a shot!

The Challenges:

  • This recipe takes some time since you have to let the dough to rest, which is required for nice steamed buns. Wrappingfolding technique– Making the steamed buns appear attractive will need a little expertise. BUT don’t worry. I’ll show you an EASYMETHOD in the recipe (Step 18) and in my video lesson, so you can follow along with confidence

Mastering The FoldingPleating for Steamed Pork Buns

This is the section that most people are intimidated about. Since I first published my recipe, I’ve folded the dough using the SIMPLE METHOD I described in the post (Step 18). My Nikuman was delicious, but the appearance might be improved. When my friend Maggie ofOminivore’s Cookbook released her Kimchi Pork Steamed Bunrecipe on YouTube, she demonstrated her mother’s folding and pleating method in the process. Since then, I’ve continued to wrap my nikuman in the same manner. I still have a lot of work to do to better my abilities, but the strategy has made a significant difference.

In either case, the nikuman is delicious.

PS: If you liked these steamed pork buns, I recommend that you try outShumaiandManjutoo as well!

Would you want to learn more about Japanese cuisine? To receive culinary ideas and recipe updates, sign up for our free email now! You can also keep up with my latest activities onFacebook, Pinterest, YouTube, andInstagram.

Nikuman (Steamed Pork Buns)

It is a traditional Japanese dish that consists of steamed buns that are filled with delectable savoury pork, shiitake mushrooms, cabbage, and scallion. Make this popular snack at home with these simple instructions! Preparation time: 1 hour Cooking Time: 10 minutes 1 hour of resting time Time allotted: 2 hours and 10 minutes

For the dough

  • All-purpose flour (simple flour), plus more for dusting (300 g (10.6 oz) is approximately 2 13 cups)
  • 10.6ozall-purpose flour (plain flour), plus more for dusting 2 tbsp sugar (the term “scant” refers to the fact that 2 tbsp is “just enough”). 2 Tablespoons granulated sugar (two tablespoons is 25 grams, but we only need 20 grams)
  • 12 teaspoons kosher or sea salt (I use Diamond Crystal
  • Use half for table salt)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 tablespoon neutral-flavored oil (vegetable, rice bran, canola, etc.)
  • 160-170 milliliters water (start with 160 milliliters of water and add more if necessary
  • Depending on the weather, you may need more or less)

For alternatives for Japanese condiments and ingredients, go to this page. For more information on Japanese ingredients, see this page.

  • Assemble all of the materials
  • In a large mixing bowl, combine 10.6 ounces flour, 2 tablespoons sugar, 12 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon quick dry yeast, and 1 tablespoon oil. Mixing with chopsticks or a wooden spoon, slowly add 160-170 ml water into the mixture and mixing until it is fully integrated. To avoid the dough from clinging to your hands too much, lightly sprinkle them with flour before working with it. Knead the dough with your hand, pushing it down and reshaping it as necessary. Form it into a ball, then sprinkle flour on the work area to prevent sticking. Transfer the dough to a clean work area and begin kneading it. This is how I knead the dough. To begin, press the top half of the dough into the bottom half, pressing it slightly forward. Then, using the heel of your palm, press it forward twice more before pulling it back and folding it in half again. Then, turning the dough gently, repeat the procedure for another 10-15 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and silky in appearance. Sprinkle a little amount of flour over the dough at a time to help it become less sticky
  • Form the dough into a smooth, round shape, carefully tucking any loose ends beneath. Place the dough in a large mixing basin and coat the bottom of the bowl with oil. Cover it with plastic wrap and set it aside in a warm location for 30-60 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size. While you’re waiting for the dough to rise, prepare the filling ingredients. To begin, soak the dried shiitake mushrooms in 12 cup water for 30 minutes. Place something heavy on top of the shiitake so that the entire mushroom is immersed. Place in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes while you thinly slice the scallion. The cabbage should be chopped into 1″ (2.5 cm) pieces after the rough core has been removed. 1 teaspoon salt should be sprinkled over the chopped cabbage to take out extra water. Once the shiitake mushrooms have been soaked, wring out the excess liquid, cut away the stiff stem, and mince the mushroom tops. Combine the ground pork, scallions, and shiitake mushrooms in a large mixing basin. Make a mess of the cabbage by squeezing it with your hands and throwing it into the basin
  • 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 tablespoon sake, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, 1 tablespoon potato/corn starch, and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 tablespoon sake, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, 1 tablespoon potato/corn starch, and freshly ground black pepper Knead the ingredients thoroughly until it is properly blended and appears pale and sticky in appearance. Wait until the dough is done before setting it aside (or covering it with plastic wrap and placing it in the refrigerator). Once the dough has doubled in size, flour the work area and split the dough in half, then roll each half of the dough into a log. Repeat the process with the remaining dough. Then, cut each log into five equal pieces, and then cut each piece in half again. You can use fewer pieces of dough to make larger buns if you want them to be bigger. Because holding a large amount of dough and filling in one hand is difficult, it’s also better to work with smaller amounts of dough to create attractive pleats as you wrap. Form each piece of dough into a ball, then sprinkle the dough balls with flour to prevent them from adhering to one another during the baking process. Allow enough space between each ball and cover loosely with a moist dish cloth to prevent them from drying out. Allow them to rest for 10 minutes before rolling out a ball of dough and pressing it flat with your palm. Then, using a rolling pin, flatten it into a circular sheet of paper. Here’s how I roll the dough out for the cookies. Right hand: Hold the dough’s surface in place with the left hand while using a rolling pin to roll the dough out with the right hand All that is required is that you roll the dough up and down on the bottom half of it. After rolling the dough a couple of times, use your left hand to rotate it roughly 30 degrees. It is necessary to repeat this procedure until the dough becomes thin. The middle of the dough should be somewhat thicker than the outside of the dough. Filling: Scoop 1 12 tbsp of filling (I use a 1 12 tbsp cookie scoop) and lay it in the center of the dough. Holding the dough in the left hand and sealing the bun with the index finger and thumb of the right hand To begin, take a corner of the dough with your right index finger and thumb and squeeze it together with your other two fingers (left picture). Make a tight pinching motion with your thumb while turning the dough clockwise with your left hand (see right image). Repeat this procedure around 10-12 times (= 10-12 pleats) until you have sealed the last portion of the dough by pinching it securely (see right picture). Here are a few pointers: Your left thumb should be used to hold down the filling while your left fingers are used to flip the wrapper around. Make use of your left index finger to assist with the pleating. Additionally, while making the next pleat, raise up the pinched pleats a little bit to ensure that the filling remains inside the dough. Once you’ve finished sealing the last portion of the dough, twist the pleats even tighter using your right index finger and thumb to ensure a secure seal is maintained. If you’re left-handed, you’ll want to follow the guidelines in the other direction. Easy An alternative method is to wrap the filling by pulling the dough up around the meat to the top, producing tiny pleats with the excess dough, then slightly twisting the dough to seal it and pinching it tightly to connect the sides. Prepare a sheet of parchment paper that is large enough to accommodate the bun (for a small size, 3″ x 3″). Continue to cover the completed buns with plastic wrap and continue the process with the remaining dough until all of the dough has been used. Allow the buns to rest for 20 minutes before serving. Bring a pot of water to a boil and prepare a steamer. The buns and parchment paper should be placed in a steamer tray with approximately 2″ between each bun after the water has reached a boil (buns will get larger while being steamed). Close the cover and steam for 10 minutes on a high heat setting (10 for small buns, 13 for medium, 15 for big). For a standard saucepan, wrap the lid tightly with a kitchen cloth to avoid the condensation (which forms on the lid) from pouring into the buns while steaming them. Take pleasure in the moment

To Store

  • After steaming, the buns stay well in the refrigerator until the next day and freeze well after that. They should be wrapped in plastic wrap and then placed in freezer bags (I suggest to consume in 1 week). To reheat frozen buns, steam them for a couple of minutes at a time.

calories: 125kcal; carbohydrates: 14g; protein: 5g; fat: 5g; saturated fat:2g; cholesterol:12 mg; sodium: 138 mg; potassium: 93 mg; fiber: 1g; sugar: 2 g; vitamins: 16IU; vitamin C: 4mg; calcium: 23 mg; iron: 1 mg Courses include an appetizer, a main course, and a snack. Cuisine:Japanese JustOneCookbook.com has a recipe for pork buns and steam buns. The content and photos are protected by intellectual property rights. We invite you to share this dish with your friends and family. It is completely banned to copy and/or paste whole recipes into any website or social media platform.

If you make this dish, take a picture and tag it with the hashtag justonecookbook!

Similar Savory and Sweet Treats You’ll Enjoy:

  • Calories: 125kcal
  • Carbohydrates: 14g
  • Protein: 5g
  • Fat: 5g
  • Saturated fat:2g
  • Cholesterol:12 mg
  • Sodium: 138 mg
  • Potassium: 93 mg
  • Fiber: 1g
  • Sugar: 2 g
  • Vitamins: 16IU
  • Vitamin C: 4mg
  • Calcium: 23 mg
  • Iron: 1 mcg Snacks and appetizers will be served during the course of the evening. Cuisine:Japanese Cookbook.com’s JustOneCookbook.com has pork buns and steam buns as keywords. All of the content and photos on this website are protected by intellectual property laws. There are no restrictions on you sharing this recipe, however it is greatly appreciated. It is completely forbidden to copy and paste whole recipes onto any website or social media platform. Please see my photo usage policy, which may be found at this location. Photograph your finished dish and post it with the hashtag justonecookbook if you tried it out. On Instagram, follow us @justonecookbook to share your creations with us!

Note from the editor: This piece was first published on March 16, 2015, and has been updated. It has been revised and will be released again in April 2020. Now is the time to subscribe!

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