Where To Buy Saffron Buns

VINTERSAGA saffron buns, frozen (803.805.91)

In preparation for the upcoming winter holidays, the Swedes meet as a family to decorate the house for Christmas and indulge in delectable confectionary sweets. Saffron and raisins are added to a sweet wheat bun. Swedish custom dictates that such buns be baked on St. Lucia’s Day, which falls just before Christmas, and served with a spiced drink. The Swedes like hot spiced beverages in the winter, rather than coffee, and they enjoy them with ginger cookies and saffron buns. Information Supplementary to the above

Helpful information

Keep frozen at a temperature of -18 ° C or below. After defrosting, do not put the container back in the freezer.

Warm in the winter

The days in Sweden are becoming shorter, the nights are getting longer, and the frosts are growing stronger the closer we approach to Christmas. But in the homes of Swedish people at this historical period, everything was quite the reverse of this scenario. Their goal is to make the house as warm, bright and cheerful as they possibly can for their guests. People get together as a family to prepare Christmas foods and decorate the house for the holiday season. With the VINTERSAGA collection, your house will be filled with mouth-watering scents and the enchanting ambience of the forthcoming winter holidays as well as a festive mood.

St. Lucia Saffron Buns Recipe, Swedish Lussekatter Rolls

St. Lucia Day, also known as the Festival of Light, is a day of celebration in Sweden that takes place in the spirit of Advent and Christmas on December 13, each year. Young girls are clothed in white robes with a scarlet ribbon, with one girl designated as “Lucia,” who wears a crown of lighted candles (or battery-operated candles), and the rest each holding a single candle, according to tradition. Processions abound, complete with song and celebration. At home, the eldest girl dresses up in a robe, sash, and candle crown, and delivers coffee and lussekatter, or S-shaped saffron buns, to her parents for breakfast in the morning before school starts.

  • She spoke about these saffron buns with such fondness that I couldn’t help but want to cook them myself.
  • The saffron-infused dough results in rolls that are gently sweet, buttery, and a brilliant yellow color.
  • During my investigation, I’ve come across several concerns about lussekatter being too dry or too dense.
  • Of course, the ideal way to enjoy the buns is fresh out of the oven.
  • Aside from that, the rolls reheat really nicely in the microwave, taking only a few seconds to do so.
  • (As a side note, here is a beautiful film about the Swedish Lucia ritual.) This recipe yields 12 to 14 buns of reasonable size.

The recipe may easily be doubled in size. It should be noted that the cardamom is optional. I’ve cooked these buns both with and without a pinch of cardamom, and I like them with the cardamom flavoring. In this case, I’m assuming it’ll be more traditional.

  • 3/4 cup milk (175ml)
  • 1/2 teaspoon saffron threads
  • 1 teaspoon plus 1/4 cup (50g) white granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon plus 1/4 cup (50g) white granulated sugar Active dry yeast (1/4 cup) (check the expiration date on the packaging to make sure it is still OK! )
  • 1 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 1/4 cup flour 3 1/2 to 4 cups (490g to 570g) all-purpose flour is recommended. a half teaspoon of kosher salt
  • Optional: the seeds from three cardamom pods, ground
  • 4 tablespoons (56g) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick, 4 tablespoons, 56g) flour
  • 1/2 a cup sour cream (or quark if it’s available)
  • 2 big eggs, raisins
  1. Heat the milk, saffron, and 1 teaspoon of sugar together in a small saucepan until the milk is steaming hot, about 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and mix in the sugar until it is completely dissolved. Allow it cool to around 115°F, or warm to the touch, but not hot, before serving. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer’s “Bloom the yeast” is a great example of how to do just that. Sprinkle the yeast over the heated saffron-infused milk and let aside for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the mixture becomes frothy. Combine flour, sugar, salt, and cardamom in a large mixing bowl: In the bowl of a stand-up mixer*, whisk together 3 1/2 cups (490g) of the flour, the remaining 1/4 cup sugar, the salt, and the powdered cardamom (if using) until well combined. Although you may prepare this dish without a mixer, I find it to be a little simpler to work with one. Elise Bauer’s recipe: Make a well in the center of the flour and pour in the yeast milk saffron mixture, the eggs, the butter, and the sour cream, mixing thoroughly: Combine the ingredients until they are completely combined. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Cooking with Elise Bauer
  2. Knead the dough: Make use of the dough hook attachment on your stand mixer (if using, otherwise knead by hand). Knead the dough on a low setting for the first few minutes. Slowly add extra flour, a tablespoon at a time, kneading after each addition to ensure that it is fully incorporated. Continue to do so until the dough is still a little sticky to the touch, but does not fully adhere to your hands when you handle it (about 5 minutes). Elise Bauer’s recipe for letting dough rise: Form the dough into a ball and set it aside in a large mixing basin. Wrap the dish with plastic wrap. (Please keep in mind that you may make this ahead of time and chill it overnight if you desire.) Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Allow the dough to rise in a warm area for 1 to 2 hours, or until it has doubled in size. For example, if you poke your finger into the dough, and the indentation left by your finger doesn’t disappear immediately, the dough is ready.
  3. Form the dough into S shapes as follows: The dough should double in size after being gently pressed down and kneaded a number of times. Take a bit and roll it into a ball that is about 2 inches in diameter (60 to 70 grams if you are weighing). Roll the ball out into a snake that is approximately 14 inches in length. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Then Using opposing directions, curl the ends together to make a “S” with spirals at either end. Place on a baking sheet that has been prepared with parchment paper and repeat with the remaining dough
  4. Allow for a little pause. rise: Refrigerate until the dough forms have doubled in size, 30 minutes to an hour, after which they may be served. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Buns should be brushed with egg wash and sprinkled with raisins: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (205 degrees Celsius). Brush the tops and sides of the uncooked buns with a beaten egg using a pastry brush to prevent them from drying out. Place the raisins in the middle of the “S” spirals to complete the design. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Bake: Place the buns in the oven and bake for 10 to 11 minutes at 400°F (205°C), flipping halfway through cooking to achieve equal browning, or until they are golden brown. Remove from the oven and allow it cool for 5 minutes before serving or consuming.

Websites to Check Out:Swedish Lucia for Dummies – a lighthearted movie on Swedish traditions around Saint Lucia’s Day Simply Recipes has a recipe for Swedish Tea Ring or Coffee Bread. My Diverse Kitchen has an in-depth account of the history around St. Lucia Rolls, as well as a recipe for Lussekatter (St. Lucia Rolls). Foodie Underground provides some illumination in the midst of winter’s gloom. Texanerin’s Whole Wheat St. Lucia Saffron Buns are a delicious treat. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry.

Nutrition Facts(per serving)
232 Calories
6g Fat
38g Carbs
6g Protein

Display the Complete Nutrition Label Hide the entire nutrition label

Nutrition Facts
Servings: 12 to 14
Amount per serving
Calories 232
% Daily Value*
Total Fat6g 7%
Saturated Fat 3g 15%
Cholesterol52mg 17%
Sodium69mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate38g 14%
Dietary Fiber 1g 5%
Total Sugars 6g
Protein6g
Vitamin C 0mg 1%
Calcium 34mg 3%
Iron 2mg 12%
Potassium 111mg 2%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

The nutritional information has been estimated using an ingredient database and should be regarded as an educated guess at best. When there are numerous ingredient alternatives mentioned, the first one listed is used to compute the nutritional value. There are no garnishes or extra ingredients listed in this recipe.

Swedish Saffron Buns (Lussebullar) Recipe by Tasty

For10servings

  • 13/4 cup milk (240 mL)
  • 12 cups sugar (100 g), plus 1 tablespoon divided
  • 1 teaspoon saffron thread
  • 14 oz active dry yeast 4 12 cups all-purpose flour(560g)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 3 large eggs, divided
  • 14 cups sour cream(60g)
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • Raisins or chocolate chips
  • 4 12 cups all-purpose flour(560g)
  1. In a small saucepan, heat the milk, 1 tablespoon of sugar, and saffron threads until the milk is hot. Heat over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar is completely dissolved. Once the milk is steaming, remove it from the fire and allow it to cool to 110 degrees Fahrenheit (43 degrees Celsius). Using a teaspoon, sprinkle the yeast over the milk and let it boil for 5 minutes
  2. In a large mixing basin, whisk together the flour, remaining sugar, salt, and cardamom until well combined
  3. Set aside. Make a well in the center of the flour and pour in the milk, 2 eggs, sour cream, and butter. Stir until the ingredients are completely combined. Stir to mix, then use your hands to thoroughly integrate the ingredients as the dough begins to come together. Turn the dough out onto a clean surface and knead for about 5 minutes, or until the dough is springy. In a large mixing bowl, place the dough and wrap it tightly with plastic wrap. Allow it rise for 1 hour, or until it has doubled in size, in a warm environment. Punch the dough down and turn it out onto a clean surface
  4. . Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces and set them aside. Create a ball about 2 inches (5 cm) broad and roll it into a cylinder approximately 12-14 inches (30 cm) long for each piece. Using your fingers, swirl the dough into a S shape starting at one end and working your way to the centre and then the other end. Transfer the dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, cover with plastic wrap, and allow it to rise for 30 minutes, or until it has doubled in size. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (200 degrees Celsius). The remaining egg should be beaten and brushed over the dough swirls. Using a single raisin or chocolate chip, place it in the middle of the swirls on either end of the cake. 10-12 minutes, or until the buns are golden brown and cooked through
  5. Remove from oven and serve.

For10servings

  • 13/4 cup milk (240 mL)
  • 12 cups sugar (100 g), plus 1 tablespoon divided
  • 1 teaspoon saffron thread
  • 14 oz active dry yeast 4 12 cups all-purpose flour(560g)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 3 large eggs, divided
  • 14 cups sour cream(60g)
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • Raisins or chocolate chips
  • 4 12 cups all-purpose flour(560g)
  1. In a small saucepan, heat the milk, 1 tablespoon of sugar, and saffron threads until the milk is hot. Heat over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until the sugar is completely dissolved. Once the milk is steaming, remove it from the fire and allow it to cool to 110 degrees Fahrenheit (43 degrees Celsius). Using a teaspoon, sprinkle the yeast over the milk and let it boil for 5 minutes
  2. In a large mixing basin, whisk together the flour, remaining sugar, salt, and cardamom until well combined
  3. Set aside. Make a well in the center of the flour and pour in the milk, 2 eggs, sour cream, and butter. Stir until the ingredients are completely combined. Stir to mix, then use your hands to thoroughly integrate the ingredients as the dough begins to come together. Turn the dough out onto a clean surface and knead for about 5 minutes, or until the dough is springy. In a large mixing bowl, place the dough and wrap it tightly with plastic wrap. Allow it rise for 1 hour, or until it has doubled in size, in a warm environment. Punch the dough down and turn it out onto a clean surface
  4. . Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces and set them aside. Create a ball about 2 inches (5 cm) broad and roll it into a cylinder approximately 12-14 inches (30 cm) long for each piece. Using your fingers, swirl the dough into a S shape starting at one end and working your way to the centre and then the other end. Transfer the dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, cover with plastic wrap, and allow it to rise for 30 minutes, or until it has doubled in size. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (200 degrees Celsius). The remaining egg should be beaten and brushed over the dough swirls. Using a single raisin or chocolate chip, place it in the middle of the swirls on either end of the cake. 10-12 minutes, or until the buns are golden brown and cooked through
  5. Remove from oven and serve.

Lussekatter – Traditional Swedish Saffron Buns [Authentic Recipe]

There may be affiliate links in this content, which will be clearly indicated with an asterisk *. For additional information, please see my disclosure statement. The most important aspect of a Swedish Christmas is the lussekatter! Made in time for Saint Lucia Day, they’re eaten all during the holiday season and are typically shaped in the manner seen in this photograph. This is my all-time favorite recipe since it is 100 percent original, proven and tested, and it is simple to create without the use of quark or nuts.

While they are crucial for Christmas, they are especially important on St Lucia Day (December 13th) (yes, the same day we dress up in white night gowns and place candles on our heads), and I for one take advantage of each opportunity I have to have one during the month of December.

See also:  How To Make Air Buns

What are they?

Lussekatter, also known as Swedish saffron buns or saffron bread, is a sweet “bread” produced using simple components such as yeast, wheat, sugar, milk, and butter. It is traditionally served warm. However, there is a twist in that they are seasoned with saffron. Saffron (or turmeric, if you purchase the cheap ones from the shop) is what gives them their gorgeous yellow color, as well as their incredible taste, which is unmatched by any other sort of bun on the planet. The form you see here is the original one; the name Lussekatter, which translates as “Lucia Cats,” comes from the fact that this shape is said to resemble a cat’s tail when viewed from certain angles.

Why you will love this recipe

  • Honestly, they’re the juiciest, fluffieste Lussekatter I’ve ever made or eaten, and I’ve tried a lot of other varieties. It is really simple to prepare without the use of additional ingredients such as quark or powdered nuts. Excessively buttery, which translates as excessively delicious
  • Because the baking temperature is lower than in most recipes, the result is perfectly golden. Follow my suggestions below to achieve the best consistency and taste possible in the shortest amount of time.

What you need to make them

  • The milk, yeast, and butter should all be at room temperature before use. Fresh yeast—if you have a choice between conventional yeast and yeast for sweet doughs, choose the sweet doughs yeast. Both, though, are effective. If you want to use instant dried yeast instead of fresh yeast, you will only need one-fourth of the amount mentioned. This equates to 0.5 oz of sugar per batch of this recipe (14 g). You’ll also need to tweak the procedure a little bit. To begin, combine the instant dry yeast and flour in a mixing bowl and let aside for 10 minutes. Continue with the recipe as given, combining the milk, butter, sugar, and saffron together before adding in the flour and yeast mixture, mixing well after each addition. You should be aware that the dough may take a little longer to rise when using dried yeast rather than fresh yeast. Ground saffron (if using threads) should be ground first in a mortar and pestle or a spoon and bowl, but this is something I recommend even if you’re using ground saffron (in which case, use a mortar and pestle). Saffron powder can be substituted for saffron threads in several recipes. Approximately 0.04 oz (1 g) of saffron powder may be obtained from 1 tablespoon of loosely packed saffron threads. Rum is only a vehicle for extracting the greatest flavor from saffron
  • Other spirits such as vodka, cachaca, or brännvin can be used, as can plain water. Unsalted butter can be substituted with a teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of pepper

How to make them

Prepare the saffron 30 minutes before baking so that it is ready to be used. Ground it with the sugar in a mortar and pestle or with a standard bowl and spoon to achieve the desired texture and flavor. Then combine with the rum and lay away for the time being.

  1. To begin, crumble the yeast into a large mixing basin – the dish should be large enough to accommodate all of the ingredients and allow the dough to double in size
  2. In a separate bowl, whisk together the milk and yeast until the yeast is completely dissolved. Mix in the butter until well incorporated. While you should attempt to mash up the butter a little, don’t be concerned if it doesn’t entirely dissolve into the milk
  3. Sugar should be mixed in.
  1. Pour in the saffron mixture, which has been combined with sugar and alcohol. When you’re ready to use your saffron, pour a tiny amount of water into the container you used to store your saffron, swirl it around to distribute the taste, and then pour into the dough. The butter does not need to be completely dissolved in the milk at this point. Begin by adding flour and mixing it together. Slowly incorporate the ingredients, mixing until well incorporated before adding more. When it becomes difficult to combine the dough with a spoon, begin mixing it with your hands.
  1. As soon as all of the flour has been added, continue to knead the dough for at least 10 minutes more. When it’s finished, it should easily come loose from the edges of the bowl. Cover and leave aside for 60 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size. As a result, soak the raisins overnight in water and prepare two baking sheets with parchment paper. It should have doubled in size and felt elastic to the touch after around 60 minutes. Give it a little more time if it hasn’t risen sufficiently. When the dough has risen sufficiently, sprinkle some flour onto a clean work area.
  1. A small piece of dough (a single batch of this recipe should yield 40 buns) should be taken and rolled out on a lightly floured board. Roll it till it is approximately 20 cm (8 inches) in length
  2. Then, starting at one end of the dough, carefully turn them in towards each other, but on opposing sides of the dough. This is the general form you’re aiming for
  1. Placing your lussekatt on one of the oven pans that has been coated with parchment paper and repeating this process until the dough is completed Remove the raisins from the water and place two in each lussekatt – one in the center of each of the spins – as seen in the photo. Cover with plastic wrap and let aside for approximately 30 minutes, or until they’ve grown by half their size. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius/400 degrees Fahrenheit. When the lussekatter has risen to the proper level, whisk the egg and use it to brush the buns with
  1. Prior to baking, your lussekatter should look like this: Bake for 8 minutes in the centre of the oven, or until the top is brown. This might take up to a minute longer or shorter depending on your oven. When finished baking, take it from the oven and set it on a cooling rack or a kitchen towel to cool down while keeping the moisture in. Repeat the process until all of the lussekatter has been baked.

Tipstricks

  • Sugar should be used to grind your saffron, which is especially necessary if you are utilizing saffron threads rather than previously powdered saffron. Allowing the saffron to soak in alcohol before adding it to the dough will help to extract the full taste of the saffron. This method allows you to use less saffron while still getting a lot of flavor
  • Use fresh yeast
  • Dry yeast will work, but fresh yeast will rise more quickly and effectively. For the greatest consistency, use butter and milk that have been left out at room temperature (instead of melting the butter and heating the milk as many recipes will tell you). Melted butter will absorb a significant amount of flour, resulting in significantly drier final buns. Prepare your flouras by weighing them. Depending on how much flour is in a cup or deciliter, the density might vary significantly. You may use cups or deciliter measurements instead of a scale if you don’t have one, but keep an eye on how the dough feels as you go. If you have done it correctly, it should be a little sticky, but it should readily release from the edges of the bowl. Don’t use too much flour, since this will result in your buns being overly dry. Instead, thoroughly knead the dough. Knead your dough for at least 10 minutes—this, together with the room-temperature butter, makes all the difference in the consistency of the finished product. Pre-soak your raisins in water to prevent them from absorbing moisture from your dough. Allow to cool on a rack to avoid having a mushy bottom
  • If you’re freezing a portion of your recipe, let them to cool almost completely on the rack before packing them into freezer-safe bags and storing them in the freezer. This guarantees that you are able to keep as much moisture within as possible. If you don’t care for saffron, can’t locate it, or it’s just one of those years when saffron is too costly, you may substitute ground turmeric to achieve the desired yellow hue. Alternatively, mix equal parts saffron and turmeric. If you don’t care for raisins, simply leave them out. Up to 4 days should be sufficient time to store Lussekatter in plastic bags at room temperature – they will dry up before going bad. Use plastic bags to preserve Lussekatter in order to keep them fresh for extended periods of time – up to 3 months – and allow them to defrost at room temperature before serving.

Recipe FAQ

Is it possible to freeze lussekatter? Yes, without a doubt—that is exactly what we do here in Sweden. Make a batch in the beginning of December, freeze them, and enjoy them as a snack all throughout December and the Holidays. Simply allow them to cool almost completely on the rack before packing them in plastic bags and freezing them. This guarantees that you are able to keep as much moisture within as possible. Not even quark or ground almonds seem to be required for making delicious lussekatter.

According to legend, the quark myth began because the corporation wanted to sell more of this product, and while the ground almonds are an old technique (that doesn’t actually make a difference), In truth, using room temperature butter and kneading the dough for at least 10 minutes are the two most critical steps in making truly soft and juicy saffron buns.

No!

The slower rise will actually improve both the consistency and the taste of the bread – and you won’t have to worry about overheating your milkbutter and “killing” the yeast as you would with a faster rise.

How to serve them

Is lussekatter capable of freezing? We do that all the time in Sweden, so yes, it is totally correct. Make a batch in the beginning of December, freeze them, and enjoy them as a snack all throughout December and the holiday season. Simply allow them to cool almost completely on the rack before putting them in freezer-safe plastic bags. It is important to do this so that you can keep as much moisture within as possible. Not even quark or crushed almonds will enough to produce juicy lussekatter, do you think?

According to hearsay, the quark myth began because the manufacturer wanted to sell more of this product.

Not sure whether I need microwave my butter and milk to for the yeast to activate.

When using room temperature butter and milk, the yeast will function just fine, too.

More great holiday baking recipes

Do you enjoy baking? Then I recommend that you try some of my personal favorites!

  • Snowball Cookies, Candy Cane Cupcakes, and Cinnamon Muffins are some of the holiday favorites.

Cinnamon Muffins; Snowball Cookies; Candy Cane Cupcakes; Snowball Cookies; Snowball Cookies; Snowball Cookies

  • 1tablespoonsaffron threads, loosely packed
  • 1teaspoonsugar
  • 2tablespoonsrumor other alcohol/water
  • 1teaspoonsaffron threads, loosely packed
  • Fresh yeast at room temperature (see comments if you wish to use dried yeast instead)
  • 1.75 oz sugar
  • 2.1 cups milk at room temperature
  • 45 cups salted butter at room temperature, chopped into pieces
  • 34 cups sugar
  • 7 cups flour (or slightly more or less depending on preference) plus a little extra for baking out 1egg
  • 80raisins soaked in water
  • Begin by grinding your saffron and sugar together in a mortar and pestle or a bowl and a spoon, depending on your preference. Mix in the rum and allow it settle for at least 30 minutes before serving In a large mixing basin, crumble the yeast. Add the milk and mix well
  • Then add in the room temperature butter in pieces and mix well again, attempting to mash up the butter pieces as you go
  • Then add in the sugar and mix well
  • Last add in the saffron mixture with the sugar and rum and mix well. Pour a little amount of water into the bowl or glass that housed this mixture and swirl it about to ensure that you receive as much saffron flavor as possible. Start by mixing in the flour until it is well-combined. Add a little at a time until everything is well-combined. As soon as it becomes difficult to combine with a spoon, begin mixing with your hands
  • As soon as all of the flour has been added, begin kneading the dough. Knead for at least 10 minutes, or even longer if you have the opportunity. When it’s finished, it should easily come away from the edges of the dish. Please do not add any more flour! Once completed, cover the dough with a kitchen towel and allow it to rise for 60 minutes. After 60 minutes, check to see whether the dough has risen enough. It should be approximately twice the size of the original. Place a piece of parchment paper on top of an oven pan and bake for 30 minutes or until the dough has doubled in size. Lay down a tiny amount of flour on a clean work area and cut out a small piece of dough – enough to make one Lussekatt. Roll it out into a snake that is about 20 cm/7-8″ long, and then roll the edges in to produce the characteristic Lussekatt shape that you see on the internet. Then set them on the parchment paper, being sure to leave enough space between them so that they may rise by about 50% more. Continue until you’ve used up all of your dough
  • Drain the raisins and add two raisins in each Lussekatt, one in the middle of each spin, so that they are evenly distributed. Set it aside for 30 minutes after that, covered with a kitchen towel Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (200 degrees Celsius). Allow for another 30 minutes of rising time before mixing in your egg and removing the kitchen towel. Once the Lussekatter has reached its full volume, remove the kitchen towel. After brushing the Lussekatter with the egg, set it in the centre of the oven to bake. Bake for 8 minutes, or until the top is brown, then take from the oven and cool on a cooling rack or kitchen towel. Cover with a kitchen towel to keep the moisture out. Continue baking until you’ve used up all of the Lussekatter.

Depending on your oven, the cooking time will vary.

Ingredient notessubstitutions

  • Fresh yeast—if you have a choice between conventional yeast and yeast for sweet doughs, choose the sweet doughs yeast. Both, though, are effective. If you want to use instant dried yeast instead of fresh yeast, you will only need one-fourth of the amount mentioned. This equates to 0.5 oz of sugar per batch of this recipe (14 g). You’ll also need to tweak the procedure a little bit. To begin, combine the instant dry yeast and flour in a mixing bowl and let aside for 10 minutes. Continue with the recipe as given, combining the milk, butter, sugar, and saffron together before adding in the flour and yeast mixture, mixing well after each addition. You should be aware that the dough may take a little longer to rise when using dried yeast rather than fresh yeast. Ground saffron (if using threads) should be ground first in a mortar and pestle or a spoon and bowl, but this is something I recommend even if you’re using ground saffron (in which case, use a mortar and pestle). Saffron powder can be substituted for saffron threads in several recipes. Approximately 0.04 oz (1 g) of saffron powder may be obtained from 1 tablespoon of loosely packed saffron threads. Rum is only a vehicle for extracting the greatest flavor from saffron
  • Other spirits such as vodka, cachaca, or brännvin can be used, as can plain water. Unsalted butter can be substituted with a teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of pepper
See also:  How To Make Princess Leia Buns With Short Hair

Tipstricks

  • Sugar should be used to grind your saffron, which is especially necessary if you are utilizing saffron threads rather than previously powdered saffron. Allowing the saffron to soak in alcohol before adding it to the dough will help to extract the full taste of the saffron. This method allows you to use less saffron while still getting a lot of flavor
  • Use fresh yeast
  • Dry yeast will work, but fresh yeast will rise more quickly and effectively. For the greatest consistency, use butter and milk that have been left out at room temperature (instead of melting the butter and heating the milk as many recipes will tell you). Melted butter will absorb a significant amount of flour, resulting in significantly drier final buns. Prepare your flouras by weighing them. Depending on how much flour is in a cup or deciliter, the density might vary significantly. You may use cups or deciliter measurements instead of a scale if you don’t have one, but keep an eye on how the dough feels as you go. If you have done it correctly, it should be a little sticky, but it should readily release from the edges of the bowl. Don’t use too much flour, since this will result in your buns being overly dry. Instead, thoroughly knead the dough. Knead your dough for at least 10 minutes—this, together with the room-temperature butter, makes all the difference in the consistency of the finished product. Pre-soak your raisins in water to prevent them from absorbing moisture from your dough. Allow to cool on a rack to avoid having a mushy bottom
  • If you’re freezing a portion of your recipe, let them to cool almost completely on the rack before packing them into freezer-safe bags and storing them in the freezer. This guarantees that you are able to keep as much moisture within as possible. If you don’t care for saffron, can’t locate it, or it’s just one of those years when saffron is too costly, you may substitute ground turmeric to achieve the desired yellow hue. Alternatively, mix equal parts saffron and turmeric. If you don’t care for raisins, simply leave them out. It’s okay to keep them in plastic bags at room temperature for up to 4 days because they’ll dry out before going bad. To preserve for extended periods of time (up to 3 months), place them in plastic bags and freeze.

Amount of calories: 153kcal|Carbohydrates: 24g|Protein: 3 g|Fat: 5 g|Saturated Fat: 3 g|Cholesterol: 16mg|Sodium: 73 mg|Potassium: 59 mg|Fiber: 1g|Sugar: 6 g|Vitamin A: 151IU|Vitamin C: 1mg|Calcium: 20 mg|Iron: The nutritional information provided is approximate and generated automatically, and it should only be used as a guideline for dietary choices.

Reader Interactions

When I was a kid, my mother taught me how to create Lussekatter, a Swedish traditional sweet bread filled with saffron and eaten in celebration of St. Lucy’s feast day, also known as Santa Lucia day! Swedish people celebrate this as a major and significant holiday, and it has been an amazing pleasure for us to incorporate these events into our lives for the past ten years. In this section, you can discover my materials for commemorating the feast of Santa Lucia. With the addition of a Swedish acquaintance, I now have the added bonus of being able to communicate in Swedish.

Lucy Day traditions in Sweden, he surprised me by revealing that he had an original Swedish recipe for lussekatter on hand!

Product links featured may be affiliate links, which means that if you click through and make a purchase, I will receive a small compensation at no additional cost to you.

This recipe is also available in a printable format at the bottom of this article. Enjoy! Don’t forget about it; it will be really beneficial to you.

How To Keep Saffron Buns From Being Too Dry

Despite the fact that I’ve been making this recipe for years, I’ve always believed the buns were too dry and that they needed to be cooked and consumed on the same day. However, after having a talk with my Swedish buddy, I discovered that they use an element in their recipes that prevents the buns from being too dry. This component, on the other hand, is not easily available in the United States. As a result, a large number of recipes in English simply do not include the component. This component is referred to as “kvarg.”

What To Substitute For “Cream Fresh”

Kvarg translates to “cream fresh” in the English language. Due to our mandated pasteurization procedure for our dairy, we do not have it available to us here in the United States at this time. I was told by a Swedish acquaintance that this product can occasionally be found at Target, but it is generally flavored (such as with garlic flavoring or berry flavoring), and you need plain for this recipe. So, what do we employ? Fortunately, plain Greek yogurt is the closest thing we have to a dairy alternative here in the Philippines.

As a child, my great grandmother used to prepare a “chocolate tempting cake” that was incredibly moist thanks to the sour cream in the recipe, so this made perfect sense to me right away!

Another Swedish Baking Tidbit

In addition, I noticed that when it comes to baking in Sweden, they frequently use a syrup rather than simple sugar to sweeten their dishes. My Swedish buddy informed me that certain recipes call for a dark syrup, while others call for a light syrup. The light syrup is required for this recipe. Here is where you can get the original Swedish baking syrup. When I shared this link with my Swedish buddy, he immediately identified it as the syrup that they all consume. I’m going to use light corn syrup from the United States instead.

How To Garnish Authentic Swedish Lussekatter

It was also revealed to me that in Swedish baking, a syrup is commonly used to sweeten the recipes rather than simple sugar. Several recipes, according to a Swedish friend, call for dark syrup, while others call for light. The light syrup is called for in this recipe. Authentic Swedish baking syrup is available for purchase at this location. The moment I sent my Swedish friend the link to this page, she identified it as the syrup that they all consume! Light corn syrup from the United States will be substituted.

About The Saffron

This is not a cheap product. As a matter of fact, it is the most expensive spice in the planet. A little amount of Saffron may be purchased in grocery shops in the form of a spice bottle; however, inside the spice bottle is really a tiny baggie containing a small bit of Saffron. While one packet of Saffron would suffice, two packets will provide a more bright yellow color as well as a more strong scent and flavor. This year, I placed an order for our saffron on Amazon. It’s really simple! If you have the opportunity to visit a speciality spice store, you will discover that it is far less expensive.

In order to get the maximum flavor from your saffron, smash it and soak it in 2 tablespoons of vodka the day before baking. Allow it to soak overnight, or at the very least for 1 hour. If you don’t want to use vodka, you may substitute warm milk in this recipe instead.

Soak The Raisins

This is not a low-priced commodity. According to some sources, it is indeed the most costly spice on the planet. A little amount of Saffron may be purchased in grocery shops in the form of a spice bottle; however, inside the spice bottle is a small baggie containing a small bit of Saffron. Even though one package of Saffron would enough, using two packages will result in a more brilliant yellow color, as well as a stronger scent and flavor. The saffron we use this year was purchased on Amazon.

Going to a speciality spice store will really save you money because the prices are far lower than at a grocery store or supermarket.

If you don’t want to use vodka, you may substitute warm milk for it.

Swedish Santa Lucia Saffron Bun Recipe

Okay, after putting in a lot of effort to translate this recipe from Swedish to English, then even more effort to convert it from deciliters and grams to cups, then figuring out the best possible American substitutes, I am very pleased to present to you this authentic Swedish recipe for saffron buns. Please provide below his handwritten recipe for Santa Lucia buns in Swedish, in case any of my Swedish-speaking readers are interested.

Ingredients For Lussekatter

  • 2/3 cup light corn syrup (or the Swedish light syrup)
  • 2/3 cup 1 percent milk
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 stick butter
  • 2 grams saffron (or 1/4 tsp. )
  • 8 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup greek yogurt (or cream fresh, or cream cheese, or sour cream)
  • 1 pack active dry yeast (or 50g fresh refrigerated yeast, which is what the Swedish people use)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup light corn syrup (or the Swedish

Garnish For The Saffron Buns

  • The following ingredients: egg (to brush the tops), raisins, pearl sugar (optional), other granulated sugar

How To Make The Saffron Buns

Before you begin, soak your raisins in water or orange juice for a few minutes. To begin, you’ll want to crush and soak the saffron in warm water. After placing it on a paper plate and pressing down with the back of a spoon, I was ready to use it in the recipe. When I was finished, I bent the plate and used it as a funnel to fill the measuring spoon halfway with saffron. You’ll want to soak the saffron for a few minutes to bring out the taste, and you have a few options for doing so. You may either add the saffron powder directly to the.

  • Let it rest overnight with 2 tablespoons of vodka. Saffron is soaked for at least 1 hour in warm water or warm milk to bring out the full color and flavor of the saffron

Melt the stick of butter in a medium-sized saucepan, then whisk in the milk until it is thoroughly warmed. Warm, not hot or boiling, but just right. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the sugar and yeast until well combined. Stir everything together and throw it into a big mixing basin. Stir in half of the flour until everything is well combined. Combine 1 egg, the Greek yogurt, the syrup, and the salt in a mixing bowl. Make a thorough stir. Now, gradually incorporate the remaining flour into the mixture until it is no longer sticky.

  • It should be double the size in bulk.
  • They are traditionally shaped in a way that looks like the letter “S.” Some people think it’s shaped like a figure eight, which is correct.
  • Allow the buns to rise for a second time on the baking sheet for approximately 30 minutes.
  • Using a paper towel, pat dry your raisins and use them to decorate your buns, along with pearl sugar if wanted, to finish them off.
  • Everything you don’t consume on the same day should be frozen because they don’t keep for very long!
  • My Swedish buddy suggested freezing them separately in sandwich bags and extracting them one at a time, microwaving them in the bag to keep the moisture in the meat.

Personal preference, we don’t microwave in plastic at our place, but to each his or her own, as they say. We wrapped them in baggies with a few pieces of holiday garland and delivered them to our pals!

More St. Lucy Feast Day Resources

You can discover everything you need to celebrate St. Lucy’s Day right here, including a plethora of resources, Swedish foods, customs, and even crafts to get you in the mood.

Printable Version Of The Recipe

This will make it much easier for you to bake your St. Lucy buns without having to lug your computer into the kitchen with you! When you’ve finished reading all of my recommendations, you’re ready for the cliff notes version. To obtain your own copy of the file, simply click on the blue button that reads “get your free download” to the right.

Another Swedish Cookie Recipe!

My absolute favorite cookies of all time, and I’m going to share all of my baking techniques and tricks with you to make baking these cookies as simple as possible! Don’t miss out on the most delectable cookie recipe ever created.

Swedish saffron buns and gingerbread biscuits

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Saffron buns recipe

(There are 25 buns total) 1 g saffron threads (optional) yeast (50 g) Ingredients: 200 g sugar, 300 mL milk 1 egg 150–200 g butter 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon salt 750 g flour 100 g dried cranberries 1 egg, 2 tablespoons water for the glaze

Preparation

To create ‘Lucia cats’ (lussekatter), pound the saffron and a cube of sugar together in a mortar and pestle until finely ground. (For those who like to plan ahead, drizzle a little cognac on top and set aside for a few days). In a mixing dish, combine the yeast and a few tablespoons of milk until well combined. Pour the milk into the butter when it has melted. Add the remainder of the ingredients, excluding the raisins, and knead the dough for 10 minutes in a dough mixer until it is smooth and elastic.

  • Divide the dough into 25 pieces and roll the buns into an oblong shape that is approximately 10 cm (4 in) long and 10 cm (4 in) wide.
  • Then roll them twice as long and twist the ends of each bun in opposing ways to make a figure 8.
  • Prepare a greased baking sheet and set aside for about 90 minutes, or until the buns have doubled in size, covered with a towel.
  • Brush the buns with the egg and water mixture once they have been beaten together.
See also:  New England Hot Dog Buns Where To Buy

Swedish Saffron Buns

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Ingredients

The original recipe yields around 35 servings. The ingredient list has been updated to match the number of servings stated.

Directions

  • In a small saucepan, heat the milk and butter until the butter has melted and the temperature has reached 100 degrees F. (38 degrees C). Pour the heated milk over the yeast in a mixing bowl and stir until the yeast is completely dissolved. Stir vigorously until the yeast is completely dissolved. Advertisement
  • Combine the quark, saffron, sugar, salt, and 7 cups of the flour in a large mixing bowl until well combined. Mix the dough in the bowl until it turns glossy and smooth, adding additional flour as required until the dough begins to pull away from the edges of the bowl, about 5 minutes total. Cover with plastic wrap and let aside for 40 minutes. Prepare 2 or 3 baking pans by lining each with a layer of parchment paper and bake for 30 minutes. Punch down the dough and divide it into 35 pieces after lightly flouring your work surface. Each component should be rolled into a rope 5 to 6 inches in length. Make a curled S shape out of the rope by rolling each end towards the center, in different directions, while the rope is still laying flat on the work area. Place the buns on the baking pans that have been prepared, and decorate with raisins if desired. During this time, preheat the oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C) and cover the pan with a cloth. Gently brush each bun with beaten egg, then bake for 5 to 10 minutes, or until they are puffy and golden.

Editor’s Note:

Please keep in mind that the quantity of ingredients, the temperature of the oven, and the baking time alter when compared to the magazine version of this recipe.

Nutrition Facts

Per serving: 169 calories; 4.4 grams of protein; 29.1 grams of carbs; 4 grams of fat; 15.5 milligrams of cholesterol; 67.9 milligrams of sodium Nutrition in its entirety

Saffron Buns (4) **Order by Noon for Next Day Delivery**

£1.49 is the equivalent of one pound.

Due to the fact that Prima Bakeries bakes to order, you will receive the freshest bakery possible – the deadline for Next Day Delivery or Collection is Noon. Cakes, scones, and other baked goods fall into the following categories: Pastries

Additional information

£1.49 is the equivalent of one pound. Due to the fact that Prima Bakeries bakes to order, you will receive the freshest bakery possible – the deadline for Next Day Delivery or Collection is Noon. Cakes, scones, and other baked goods fall into the following categories: Pastries

Lussekatter (Swedish Saffron Buns)

Lussekatter are a light and fluffy confection that is easy to create for St. Lucia’s Day and other occasions. These Swedish Saffron Buns are the perfect way to kick off the holiday season!

Swedish Saffron Buns

Sweet yeast rolls are common in Sweden, but during the holiday season, they take on a new shape and significance for the people who consume them. Saffron imparts a gorgeous golden hue to these rolls, which are further enhanced by the use of black raisins. The rolls have a little sweetness to them and are just rich enough thanks to the addition of eggs and butter. “Lussekatter,” which translates as “Lucia cats,” derives from the fact that they are commonly served on Saint Lucia’s Feast Day, which is celebrated in December, and because the scrolling buns have the appearance of a cat tail.

Who Was Saint Lucia?

Lucia was a Christian young lady who was born into a wealthy and aristocratic family. In 304AD, she was assassinated because of her religious beliefs. She was well-known for smuggling food into the catacombs of Rome, where persecuted Christians were sheltering from the authorities. When journeying through the dark tunnels, she would put a wreath made of candles on her head, allowing her to carry food with one hand while using the other to keep warm. Her given name, “Lucy,” is derived from the Greek word for “light.” Since her martyrdom, the feast of St.

  • However, these days, her feast day is extensively observed across Scandinavia, as well as in Croatia and Hungary, among other places.
  • As a result of this, St.
  • Her feast day is commemorated on the 13th of December.
  • She delivers a platter of hot beverages, cookies, and saffron buns to her family and friends who have gathered in the house to celebrate the holiday.

Rolling Lussekatter: St Lucia Buns

When making the dough for our recipe for Lussekatter, it should be soft and malleable. However, while you are rolling out our buns, the dough has a propensity to spring back on itself, which is not ideal. You will be rolling the pieces a bit at a time in order to counteract this. Begin by attempting to encourage them to a height of 4-6 inches. It will be much simpler to roll the pieces all the way to 13-14 inches in length when they have had a chance to rest and take on that form. To make a loose “S” using two spirals from the dough after it has been formed into a long snake, twist the two ends in opposing ways to form a loose “S.” After that, you can lay a raisin in the center of each spiral and allow the buns to rise before baking them until they are a gorgeous golden brown.

Lussekatter (Swedish Saffron Buns)

Make your saffron milk and begin soaking your raisins 1 hour before you want to begin baking your bread for the best results. 24 buns (each 4 inches long) are made using this recipe. Preparation time: 3 hours Cooking Time: 8 minutes 3 hours and 8 minutes in total Course:Bread Cuisine:Swedish Servings:24people

For the Egg Wash

  • Place the saffron threads in a small bowl and carefully ground them into a fine powder using the back of a spoon, following the directions on the package (or use a mortar and pestle). Place the mixture in the refrigerator for an hour or two, stirring regularly, to allow the saffron colour to penetrate the milk. Place the raisins in a small bowl and cover with warm water to prevent them from drying out. Set them aside to allow them to ripen

For the Dough

  • In a large mixing basin, combine the warmed milk and the sugar. Using a few tablespoons of sugar, combine the ingredients. Let it sit for 5-10 minutes until the yeast has softened and begun to froth on the surface of the milk. Mix in the remaining sugar, melted and cooled butter, beaten egg, and prepared saffron milk until well combined (about 5 minutes more). After each addition of salt and flour (a total of 1 cup at a time), stir well to combine. Just enough flour to bring the dough together and make it kneadable is all that is needed. Using a lightly dusted countertop, turn out the dough and knead it for 5-6 minutes, adding extra flour as required to keep the dough from sticking to your fingers. Make a ball out of the dough and set it in a clean, oiled mixing bowl. Once the dough is smooth and soft, remove it from the mixing bowl. Cover the bowl with a moist tea towel and set it aside in a warm, draft-free location for 60-90 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size. Once the dough has risen, turn it out onto a work surface and knead it a few times. Divide the dough into 24 pieces that are nearly equal in size. Each component should be rolled into a ball. Afterwards, roll each ball into a 6-inch snake shape. Finally, lengthen each snake to around 13-14 inches in length. As a result, we roll out the dough in stages since it has a propensity to spring back on you. Allowing it some time to rest will make it easier to catch your long snake later on.)
  • Spiral the ends of each snake in opposing directions to make a scrolling “S” shape for each snake. Place the scrolled “S” on a baking sheet that has been lined with parchment paper
  • Bake for 15 minutes. After rinsing your raisins, spread them out on a paper towel to dry. (Wipe them down with a towel if necessary.) Place a raisin in the center of each spiral for decoration. Make a second batch with the remaining dough. To make your egg wash, whisk together the egg and water until well combined. Apply the mixture to the buns with a pastry brush. Allow the buns to rise for 20-30 minutes in a warm, draft-free environment, or until they are puffy and have about doubled in size
  • Preheat your oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit near the conclusion of this final rising period. Bake the buns for 8-10 minutes, or until they are golden brown. Before serving the heated rolls, remove them from the oven and allow them to cool on a wire rack for 5 minutes. (These rolls are best consumed within 2-3 days of baking.)

DISCLAIMER: This post may include affiliate connections to Amazon.com. You can use the following websites to assist you in locating some of the more specialized goods that we mention in the recipe. If you make a purchase after clicking through our links, we will get a small compensation from Amazon at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support. Thank you so much for your support of Curious Cuisiniere! Sarah is a founding member of the Curious Cuisiniere team. Her French Canadian Grandmother instilled in her a lifelong appreciation for ethnic food from a young age.

Since then, she has traveled widely and takes pleasure in bringing the tastes of her trips back into her dishes, which are simple and quick to prepare.

St. Lucia Buns Recipe

  • 12 cups lukewarm milk, 3 tablespoons saffron, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup fresh yeast, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 pounds wheat flour (or as needed), 6 ounces melted butter beaten egg, to be used as a brush
  • A scattering of raisins, for garnish.

Preparation

  1. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the butter and milk. In a mortar and pestle, pound the saffron and sugar together until fine, then add into the mixture until well combined. Put the yeast in a small amount of lukewarm butter mixture and let it sit for a few minutes. Then add the entire butter mixture, the remaining sugar, and the salt
  2. Stir until well combined. Add just enough flour (nearly all of it) to produce a workable dough, kneading for 10 minutes by hand or 5 minutes in a mixer fitted with a dough hook until the dough is smooth and elastic. Form into a ball, sprinkle with a little flour, and wrap in a towel to keep it moist. Allow for 30 to 45 minutes of rising time in a warm location. Make a well in the center of the dough and knead in enough flour to make it smooth and elastic. Buns, braids, and lengths may all be created as desired. Place on baking pans that have been lined with parchment paper and allow to rise for 30 to 45 minutes more. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Brush the buns with a beaten egg and softly push the raisins into the dough with your fingers. Bake until the tops of the buns are brown and risen, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of a bun comes out completely dry. Depending on the size of the bun, it might take 8-10 minutes
  3. Longer lengths and braids could take 15 to 20 minutes. Place the buns on a rack covered with a towel to cool.

Saffron Buns

The key to producing these gently sweet pastries, which are based on a recipe sent to us by Gunilla von Heland, a food editor based in Stockholm, is to soak the saffron in hot milk before adding it into the batter. Todd Coleman is a writer who lives in the United States. The key to producing these gently sweet pastries, which are based on a recipe sent to us by Gunilla von Heland, a food editor based in Stockholm, is to soak the saffron in hot milk before adding it into the batter. Saffron Buns are a sweet treat made with saffron.

Makes 32 BUNS in total.

Ingredients

  • Active dry yeast in two (1/4-ounce) packets milk boiled to 115°
  • 2 teaspoons saffron, gently broken
  • 2 cups sugar three and a half cups plus one teaspoon sugar
  • Six and a half cups flour
  • Three and a quarter teaspoon kosher salt
  • Three eggs
  • Twelve tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes and melted
  • Canola oil is used for frying
  • 64 raisins are used as garnish.

Instructions

  1. Set aside for 10 minutes while the yeast, milk, saffron, and 1 teaspoon sugar are mixed together in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or by hand). Combine the remaining sugar, flour, salt, and 2 eggs in a large mixing bowl until well combined. On a low speed, mix until a dough ball develops and begins to cluster around the paddle. Replace the paddle with a dough hook and add the butter
  2. Knead on medium-high speed for 8 minutes, or until the dough pulls away from the edges of the bowl. Transfer the dough to a large oiled mixing basin and cover with plastic wrap
  3. Set aside in a warm location until it has doubled in size, about 1 hour
  4. Repeat with remaining dough. Divide the dough into 32 equal pieces and roll each piece into an 8-inch-long rope with your hands. Create a S shape out of each rope, and then roll each end into a tight spiral to finish it off. (SeeShaping Saffron Buns for an illustrated step-by-step guide on how to make this recipe.) Lay out the formed dough pieces on baking sheets coated with parchment paper, spacing them 2 inches apart
  5. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise in a warm area for 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Remove the plastic wrap from the dough pieces and insert a raisin into the middle of each of the spirals. Lightly whisk the remaining egg with 1 tablespoon water and spread the egg mixture onto each bun. Bake for 16 minutes, or until the buns are golden brown and cooked through. After transferring the buns to a wire rack, set them aside for at least 10 minutes before serving

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