Where To Buy Sonoran Hot Dog Buns

Sonoran Hot Dog

Ana Frias has published a new article. Sonoran Hot Dogs have been elevated to an entirely new level! The hot dog is wrapped in bacon and served on a soft bun with sautéed onions, chopped tomatoes, and your choice of sauce or dressing (optional). Once you’ve had one of these, you’ll never want to eat another ordinary hot dog again! Sonoran Hot Dogs are incredibly tasty and simple to prepare. Please allow me to boast a little about my status as a Sonoran Hot Dog snob, okay? After all, I was born in the heart of the Sonoran Desert, the birthplace of THE Sonoran Hot Dog!

There are a plethora of variations available, but I’ll teach you how to build the classic version here.

You’ll find the following information in this post:

  • Ingredients
  • Instructions for Making Sonoran Hot Dogs
  • Print Recipe
  • Reviews and Comments

This is an authentic recipe for Mexican Sonoran Hot Dogs from the Sonoran Desert.

Ingredients

The components are straightforward and quick to obtain:

  • Buns, beef hot dogs, and thin bacon are all included. onions, either sliced (for sautéing) or chopped (for eating raw)
  • Tomatoes, finely chopped
  • Mayonnaise, mustard, ketchup, spicy sauce, and salt and pepper are some of the condiments. Highly advised that you serve them with Chiles Toreados (hot peppers). All hot dog stands in Mexico offer them with these chillies
  • They are available everywhere. Avocado, entire cooked beans, and sautéed mushrooms are all optional. This was never done with the originals, but you are more than welcome to try it.

A note about the buns

They are not your normal hot dog bun, but the original bread can only be obtained in Sonora and a few other specialized shops, and it cannot be bought anyplace else. They are designed particularly for use with “dogos.” Because you may not be able to locate any in your area, go for a soft extra big hot dog bun instead. The bun is always steamed rather than grilled to ensure that it remains soft and warm while being consumed. I’ll teach you how to accomplish it in the section below.

How To Make Sonoran Hot Dogs

This is a simple process that will become more effective the more you do it.

  • Begin by laying the bacon edge on the top of the hot dog and wrapping it by overlapping the bacon as you travel down the hot dog. In order to prevent the bacon from opening and shrinking as you cook the hot dog, tuck one end of it within the bacon itself with your finger at its base to seal the edge of the hot dog. If this doesn’t work, you may use a toothpick to hold it in place until you become better at it

Place the bacon on top of the hot dog and wrap it around it by overlapping the bacon as you go along the length of it. To prevent the bacon from opening and shrinking while you are cooking it, tuck the end of the bacon into the bacon itself with your finger at the bottom of the hot dog. If this does not work, you may use a toothpick to hold it in place until you become better at it.

Cooking the hot dog:

In a large pan, brown the onions and hot dogs until they are cooked through. Turn the hot dogs around in your hands until all of the sides are uniformly crispy. It is quite delicious to cook the onions in the bacon grease!.

Steaming the buns:

Because we want the softest bread possible, the buns should be steamed. The quickest and most convenient method of steaming them is to wrap them loosely in paper towels (or a large ziploc bag) and microwave them for around 7 to 10 seconds. Just enough to make them feel soft and toasty.

Assembling the hot dogs:

  1. After the buns have been steamed, insert the hot dog inside the bun. After that, add approximately 1 tablespoon of cooked or raw onions
  2. After that, add approximately 2 teaspoons of diced tomato
  3. Spread a thin layer of mayonnaise over the tomatoes and softly press to combine the tomatoes and the mayonnaise. If you like, you may add mustard and ketchuphot sauce.

Using a hot dog, stuff the buns after they’ve been steamed. In a separate bowl, combine approximately 1 tablespoon of cooked or raw onions; approximately 2 teaspoons of diced tomato; and mix well. Then, using your fingers, softly push the mayonnaise into the tomatoes to ensure that they are well-combined. If you like, you may also add mustard and ketchuphot sauce.

Print Recipe

  • Ana Frias is a woman who lives in the United States. Preparation time: 13 minutes Cooking Time: 12 minutes Time allotted: 25 minutes Sonoran Hot Dogs have been elevated to an entirely new level! The hot dog is wrapped in bacon and served on a soft bun with sautéed onions, chopped tomatoes, and your choice of sauce or dressing (optional). 4Hot Dogs are a popular snack in the United States.
  • 4 large hot dog buns
  • 4 large all-beef hot dogs
  • 4 slices thin bacon
  • 1 12 large white or yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 4 large all-beef hot 1 roma tomato, peeled and sliced into cubes condiments: mayonnaise, mustard, ketchup, spicy sauce to taste Toreados de Chiles
  • Toreados de Chiles

Optional toppings

  • Raw onions (chopped), avocados, and whole pinto beans are all good options.
  • Begin by laying the bacon edge on the top of the hot dog and wrapping it by overlapping the bacon as you travel down the hot dog. This will prevent the bacon from opening while it is being cooked. Tuck the end of the bacon into the bacon itself to hold the edge of the hot dog at the bottom of the hot dog with your finger at the bottom of the hot dog. If this doesn’t work, you may use a toothpick to hold it in place until you become better at it. In a large pan, brown the onions and hot dogs until they are cooked through. Continue to rotate the hot dogs until all of their sides are uniformly crispy. Before building the hot dog, steam the buns by gently wrapping them in paper towels (or a large ziplock bag) and microwaving them for 7 to 10 seconds just before assembling it. Just enough to make them feel soft and toasty
  • Place the hot dog in the bun
  • Seal the bun. Add approximately 1 tablespoon of cooked or raw onions
  • Approximately 2 teaspoons of finely diced tomato
  • And mix. Spread a thin layer of mayonnaise over the tomatoes and softly press to combine the tomatoes and the mayonnaise. If you like, you may add mustard and ketchuphot sauce.

Place the bacon on top of the hot dog and wrap it around it by overlapping the bacon as you go along the length of it. The bacon will not open when it is being cooked as a result of this. Tuck the end of the bacon within the bacon itself to secure the edge of the hot dog at the bottom of the hot dog using your finger, starting at the top and working your way down. If this does not work, you may use a toothpick to hold it in place until you become better at it. In a large pan, brown the onions and hot dogs.

As soon as you are through building your hot dog, steam the buns by loosely wrapping them in paper towels (or a large ziplock bag) and microwaving them for approximately 7 to 10 seconds.

Using the bread, place the hot dog; 1 tablespoon of cooked or raw onions; 2 tablespoons of diced tomato; 1 tablespoon of cooked or raw garlic; Then, using your fingers, softly push the mayonnaise into the tomatoes to ensure that they are well-combined.

If you like, you may also add mustard and ketchuphot sauce.

Reader Interactions

It is referred to as the “Kobe dog.” Our waitress informed us that it was the chef’s personal favorite item on the lunch menu at The Mission. In a fluffy brioche bun, Australian Kobe-style wagyu beef is wrapped in applewood smoked bacon and topped with pinto beans, red onions, and crema before being served. At a restaurant that’s essentially a glamorous replica of an 18th-century Spanish mission, with chandeliers and a sky-high crucifix that surrounds an altar of tequilas, a Sonoran hot dog on the menu was a bit of a surprise.

  • The “contemporary Latin” menu at this restaurant is mostly comprised of Mexican cuisine, with a little Spanish and Peruvian cuisine tossed in for good measure.
  • The Mission has big expectations for this location.
  • On the other hand, Sonoran hot dogs are generally priced between $3.50 and $5, but this bad boy comes in at $18 and comes with no sides, not even a bulb onion or one of those mouth-burning roasted yellow chile güeros.
  • Is it really worth it?
  • However, considering that it only cost me $25 after tax and tip, I was expecting it to be five times as good.

Why I wanted to try this $18 Sonoran hot dog

There’s no denying that Mexican cuisine, like any other cuisine, can be expensive and gourmet; there’s no denying that. Simply dine at a Valley restaurant such as Bacanora or Renata’s Hearth. Each restaurant pushes the boundaries of Sonoran cuisine with innovative and masterfully executed interpretations. These establishments, along with a slew of others, dispel the erroneous belief that Mexican food should be inexpensive. No, I’m not writing this post to bring up an antiquated and boring old stereotype in that manner.

A hot dog that cost more than $10 has never entered my stomach, not even at a baseball game.

For example, the Guinness World Record for the world’s most expensive hot dog is $169, according to the Guinness Book of World Records.

However, I have consumed a large number of Sonoran dogs and served as a judge in three distinct competitions to decide who had the finest in Tucson.

In Hermosillo, the capital of Sonora, where the dogs originated, they’re more of a late-night snack that can be topped with chorizo and served with cheddar fries on the side. Sonoran hot dogs are the best: You must, however, try these Mexican baked potatoes as well.

What to expect if you order the ‘Kobe dog’

There’s no denying that Mexican cuisine, like any other cuisine, can be extremely expensive and gourmet; there’s no denying it! Alternatively, you might visit a restaurant in the Valley, such as Bacanorea or Renata’s Hearth. Using innovative and wonderfully executed Sonoran cuisine, each restaurant pushes the boundaries of the genre. Several of these establishments, as well as several others, dispel the erroneous belief that Mexican food should be inexpensive. No, I’m not writing this post to bring up an antiquated and boring old stereotype in that way.

  1. A hot dog that cost more than $10 has never entered my stomach, even at a baseball game.
  2. For example, the Guinness World Record for the world’s most expensive hot dog is $169, while the world’s most expensive hamburger is $169.
  3. My experience with Sonoran dogs is extensive, having participated in three consecutive contests to decide which establishments served the finest in the city of Tucson, Arizona.
  4. These hot dogs are more common in Sonora’s capital city of Hermosillo, where they originated, and can be ordered with chorizo and cheese fries as an after-hours snack.

The Mission

  • In which location: 7122 E. Greenway Parkway, Suite 140 in Phoenix hours: Monday through Wednesday 10 a.m to 9 p.m, Thursday through Sunday 10 a.m to 10 p.m, closed on Mondays. Lunch appetizers range from $8 to $18.50
  • Taco platters range from $12.50 to $18
  • And dinner entrees range from $22 to $38. For more information, call 480-292-7800 or visit themissionaz.com. You can reach reporter Andi Berlin by email at [email protected] or by phone at 602-444-8533. You can find her on Facebook at andiberlin, Instagram at andiberlin, and Twitter at andiberlin.com. Today is the day to subscribe to azcentral.com

How To Make Sonoran Style Hot Dogs At Home.

And now comes the moment that so many of you have been anticipating. Because individuals from all over the country have been contacting us via email, we’ll tell you how to prepare the Sonoran Style hot dog at home.

  1. Get yourself a quality all-beef hot dog, such as the Hoffy franks that we use, and some bacon to go with it. All of the extras, such as buns, pinto beans, tomato and onion sauces and toppings like as cheese and jalapenos, should be obtained. Wrap the raw bacon around the hot dog in a spiral motion from one end to the other of the hot dog, being careful not to break the bacon. Make an effort to totally coat the entire dog with bacon from end to end. Using toothpicks, secure the bacon in place. If you have a grill, cook the bacon until it is lightly browned on both sides. Please avoid making your bacon too crispy
  2. You will have enough of texture otherwise. No grill? No problem! It’s not an issue. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees while you place the bacon-wrapped dogs on a baking sheet or whatever you’re using
  3. Don’t stack them, just lay them down in a single layer and bake them until the bacon is browned and just a little crispy
  4. While you’re waiting, finish all of your cold prep and then start heating up your pinto beans. You want them hot so that the cold things don’t chill down the hot dog too quickly after it has been served. This is because you are now theoretically prepared to put the final product together. Let’s get ready to put this thing together! WOOO-HOOOO! Sorry. Please excuse me. I enjoy putting things together. A hot dog vendor always makes a great deal about the assembling and presentation of his or her product. Alternatively, a little presentation out of the assembly and spectacle. Whatever. Let’s get this party started: take your steamed bun and spread a generous coating of pinto beans on the bottom. Never skimp on the beans
  5. They make up half of the entrée, along with the dog
  6. The remainder is made up of toppings
  7. Now set down your beautiful and artfully arranged sausage. Photograph it now because we’re about to cover it up and no one will be able to see it again. Which is a bummer from a presentation aspect, but there’s no time to lament since we have to serve
  8. The cheese is placed directly on top of the hot stuff, where it will begin to warm and soften. I make use of Jack cheese that has been shredded. It has a strong flavor without being overbearing. It is important to note that the other flavors are present to neutralize and balance what is currently a massive protein bomb
  9. Then I like to put the chopped tomatoes and salsa right on top of that because all they will see when you are finished is the red underneath the white chopped onions that ride on top, so this is the majority of the presentation. Now, it is also genuine to place a single full jalapeño pepper on top of everything, but most people are unable to take a whole jalapeno pepper at once. That is something I make optional. However, in terms of presentation, it is really attractive. As a result, you end up with a color scheme that is quite near to the colors of the Mexican flag. Regardless of how it is done, a Sonoran Style should be a sight to behold. Take care not to scrimp on the fixings, and assemble and serve the Sonoran Style immediately after preparation. Allowing them to sit on platters completely built is not a good idea
  10. Instead, build them as needed for each customer. Firstly, you want to keep the internal food temperature of your dog’s food at at least 140 degrees Fahrenheit, and secondly, with all of those tomatoes and salsa, things are going to start becoming a little mushy
See also:  How To Keep Hamburger Buns Fresh

That’s all there is to it. Serve Sonoran Style hot dogs with your favorite beer or soda pop, perhaps while listening to a Marachi band in the background. Prepare yourself, because your tongue is going to explode with protein and the freshness of tomato salsa. Everything they’ve stated about meat and fats for the previous 30 years has proven out to be absolutely and utterly false, which is a wonderful thing. Enjoy this nearly-Southern-of-the-border delicacy as much as you possibly can!

So that’s how you make Sonoran Style at home.

It comes down to that. Possibly while listening to a mariachi band, serve Sonoran Style hot dogs along with your favorite beer or soda pop. Prepare yourself, because your tongue is going to explode with protein and the freshness of a tomato-basil salsa.

Everything they’ve claimed about meat and fats for the previous 30 years has proven out to be absolutely and utterly incorrect, which is a wonderful thing. Have a good time with this delectable treat that is almost South of the border.

Contact us and start your event today!

Call 602-250-0243 or send an email to [email protected] for further information. In the meanwhile, you can check out some photos of our carts in action by clicking here.

A famous Sonoran hot dog again named among best in US, but Arizona locals like this one better

TUCSON, Ariz. — The city of Tucson is home to the University of Arizona. A Tucson restaurant has won yet another award for its bacon-wrapped Sonoran hot dog, but the city’s residents may differ about the business’s dominance in the hot dog market. El Güero Canelo, which got a prestigious James Beard Award in 2018, has now earned a position on Travel Magazine’s list of the 10 Best Hot Dogs in the United States, which was published recently. It ranks the well-known Sonoran hot dog joint seventh on a list that includes other notable establishments such as Jimmy’s Red Hot in Chicago and Crif Dogs in New York, which the magazine proclaims is “really the finest,” among other notables.

  • Disparity in hot dog prices: The Heinz petition calls for change: ‘I’ll take ten wieners.’ There are ten buns.
  • A remarkable occasion for the southside Tucson taqueria, which won a James Beard Award for timeless eateries in the America’s Classics category.
  • In fact, when Güero’s grandfather, Daniel Contreras, won the honor, he admitted that he had never heard of James Beard until the organization phoned him that day.
  • Additionally, judges and national food writers vote on and write about the restaurants that they have visited.
  • Tucson is a little more difficult to get to than the state capital, and it is underrepresented in national media coverage of the state.

Ask a local about Sonoran dogs

  • For individuals who reside in the Grand Canyon State, a national list of Sonoran cuisine will always fall short of a list of Sonoran cuisine that is unique to the area. And in Tucson, the dogs in issue are essentially a part of the community. A Sonoran dog is a hot dog that is wrapped in bacon and served with beans, mustard, mayonnaise, onions, green salsa, and tomatoes. It is originally from the Mexican state of Sonora, which has its capital in Hermosillo. El Güero is only one of several vendors selling delicious Sonoran hot dogs in a fiery sea of heat. The majority of Tucsonans would agree that there are better choices available in the city. While Güero’s long-time competitorBK Carne Asada has become as well-known in Tucson, it is less well-known on a national scale. It opened its doors across the street from El Güero in 1994 and went on to defeat its competitor on the Travel Channel show “Food Wars” the following year. Even In a recent feature on Tucson tourism destinations, the Washington Post singled out BK and El Güero as standouts. Although they are competing, the two canines are virtually indistinguishable from one another. Both burgers are served on a medium-sized, bacon-wrapped wiener with an accessible, fluffy bread and identical proportions of mustard, mayo, green salsa, and beans. They’re rather good. Even better than that. However, it is still not the finest. For those of you who have not yet had a Sonoran hot dog and are not planning on visiting Tucson anytime soon, you might be able to get one in Los Angeles. Alternatively, a kit from El Güero Canelo may be ordered through the Goldbelly mail order service. It costs $75 to purchase a kit that makes six hot dogs.) Tucson’s greatest Sonoran dog, according to some. Comparing other Sonoran hot dogs, the ones served by the Ruiz Hot Dogs cart, which won a citywide Sonoran hot dog competition in 2010 (in which the author was a judge), are on an entirely different level altogether. It’s true that Ruiz Hot Dogs, which is located on the northwest corner of South Sixth Avenue and 22nd Street, uses the same ingredients as its rivals, but its Sonoran hot dogs are just a little more tasty and work together a little better than other dogos in the area. Aside from that, their hot dog, the chipilon, is roasted bun and all on the grill before it’s served, imparting crispness and intensifying the squish of all the flavorful, spicy pig ingredients inside. After sampling the most, if not all, of Tucson’s Sonoran dogs, they have determined which ones are the best for both residents and visitors. This is echoed by the Roadfood website, which describes the Sonoran dog as “magnificent, a stunning cornucopia of bacon-wrapped dog and all the trimmings* nestled within a creamy-soft bolillo bread that has been toasted to crisp-edged elegance,” as well as “delicious.” Mike Snider of USA TODAY contributed to this article. You can reach reporter Andi Berlin at [email protected] or on Twitter @amberlin. and follow her on Facebook (andiberlin), Instagram (andiberlin), and Twitter (andiberlin)
  • Andiberlin

Sonoran hot dog – Wikipedia

There are two Sonoran dogs on the bun with chopped onion, green chile sauce (with diced tomato), pinto beans, mustard, and mayonnaise (on the side). A Sonoran hot dog topped with avocado and cotija cheese, as well as pinto beans, tomatoes, green salsa, jalapenos, mustard, and mayonnaise, and served with pinto beans and tomatoes on the side. Hot dogs from Sonora, with mayonnaise slathered on top It was in the late 1980s that theSonoran hot dog, a type of hot dog from Hermosillo, the capital of the Mexican state ofSonora, first appeared on the scene.

It consists of a hot dog that has been wrapped in bacon and grilled, which is then served on an abolillo-style hot dog bun and topped with pinto beans, onions, tomatoes, and a number of extra condiments, which may include mayonnaise, mustard, and jalapeo salsa, among others.

The Sonoran hot dog is made and served by “dogueros,” or street vendors, who operate from street carts. The Sonoran hot dog is served at over 200 establishments in Tucson, and there are even more in Phoenix, according to estimates from 2009.

See also

  1. The Sonoran Hotdog Crosses the Border, NPR, August 6, 2009. abcRobbins, Ted (August 6, 2009). Ward, Coley (April 10, 2016)
  2. Retrieved on April 10, 2016. (July 1, 2010). In the words of the Arizona Daily Star, “So Much More Than a Hot Dog.” Edge, John T., et al., eds., retrieved April 10, 2016
  3. (August 25, 2009). The New York Times published an article titled “In Praise of the All-American Mexican Hot Dog.” Griselda Nevarez, Griselda Nevarez, Griselda Nevarez, Griselda Nevarez (August 15, 2015). Arizona’s Savory Invention: The Sonoran Hot Dog, according to NBC News. Bonucelli, Dominic. “Voices: Sonoran Dogs,” Edible Baja Arizona, April 10, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016. Sammy Minsk (April 10, 2016)
  4. Minsk, Sammy (April 10, 2016). (March 1, 2018). “The Hot Dog That Took the Cake from the Competition.” Sonora News from Arizona. Heather Hoch, retrieved on March 28, 2018
  5. Hoch, Heather (June 24, 2013). Phoenix New Times published an article titled “9 Best Sonoran-Style Hot Dogs in Metro Phoenix.” Topor, Lauren. “Where to Find the Best Sonoran Hot Dogs in the Valley,” Thrillist, April 10, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016. Echavarri, Fernanda. “Where to Find the Best Sonoran Hot Dogs in the Valley,” Thrillist, April 10, 2016. (August 28, 2015). Latino USA published “The Story of the Sonoran Hot Dog” in 2004. “The Sonoran Hot Dog,” Sunset Magazine, April 10, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016. Fish, Peter. “Western Essential: The Sonoran Hot Dog,” Sunset Magazine, April 10, 2016.

Bacon-Wrapped Sonoran Hot Dogs – Recipe

Robb Walsh is an American football player who plays for the New England Patriots. Servings:4 Salchichas rojos are a type of hot dog that is served at Monterrey-style Mexican restaurants and is made with fat red hot dogs. Sonoran hot dogs are what they are known as in Tucson. However, the bacon-wrapped weiner is a must, and there are other versions available. If you want to keep the bread-to-meat ratio in check, look for a small sizebolillo or torpedo roll. Prepare Mexican Grilled Corn on the Cob to accompany the dogs as part of a simple summer BBQ meal.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound tomatillos, husked and rinsed
  • 1 pound kale 1 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  • 3 fresh serrano chilies, seeded and minced
  • 1 cup finely chopped fresh mint leaves 1 cup finely minced sweet onion
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • A dash of sugar
  • 1/4 cup lime juice freshly squeezed
  • Sea salt

For the Hot Dogs

  • Recipe calls for 4 tablespoons mayonnaise, 1 tablespoon Tabasco or other spicy sauce, the juice of 1 lemon, 4 all-beef wieners (fat wieners work better than long ones), and 4 lemons. 4 slices extra-thin bacon
  • 4 torpedo rolls orbolillos
  • 4 tablespoons warm refried beans
  • 8 tablespoons chopped avocado (or guacamole)
  • 4 heaping tablespoons grated Monterey jack or cheddar cheese
  • 4 tablespoons Salsa Verde
  • 4 tablespoons guacamole
  • 4 tablespoons gua

Preparation

  • Place the tomatillos in a pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Bring the water to a boil, then turn off the heat and set aside for 5 minutes to enable the tomatillos to soak. Remove the tomatillos from the heat, strain, and purée them in a food processor until smooth. Combine the cilantro, serranos, onion, garlic sugar, and lime juice in a food processor by pulsing it three or four times until everything is well combined. Season with salt to your liking

Make the Hot Dogs:

  • Combine the mayonnaise, Tabasco sauce, and lemon juice in a mixing bowl, then transfer the mixture to a squeeze bottle using a funnel. Using the bacon pieces, thoroughly wrap the wieners so that the sausage is entirely covered. Preheat the comal or flat top over medium heat, turning the wieners occasionally, until the bacon is crispy on both sides, about 7 minutes. Make a “boat” out of the buns by cutting a pocket into them and toasting them on the grill. When the wieners are finished cooking, divide the beans and avocado among the four buns, spooning them into the pocket and distributing them on either side of the pocket. Spread the cheese over the centre of the plate. Using tongs, carefully place one piping-hot bacon-wrapped wiener into the pocket of each bun and serve immediately. Onions and tomatoes should be placed on top of each wiener. Distribute the Salsa Verde evenly across the top. Apply the mayonnaise to the hot dog and spread it in squiggles across the top of it.

Reviews (6 reviews)

  • Thon00| 01/10/2012I really like this meal! So simple and delicious that I cooked it for supper last night for my family and it was a hit. Thanks! Take a look at fr.gourmandia.ca for many more delectable recipes! You’ll be astonished at how many various varieties there are in their recipe collection. Give it a thumbs up! shazzzz| July 22nd, 2011 The first time I tried this was in Pennsylvania, where it was referred to as a Texas Tommy
  • It was not nutritious, but it was delicious. Linda 52| June 24th, 2011 My daughter has recently returned from a trip in Tucson, where she gushed about the hot dogs she had there! I was browsing the web when I came across this recipe, and I’m so glad I did! I made a handful more tweaks, and the end product was just stunning. Pinto beans were used first, and they were placed in the bun first. Guacamole was produced, the dogs were barbecued, and the buns were steamed for 1 minute before serving! I judged the food based on what my daughter had received in Tucson, and we were not disappointed by the little alterations made. I upped the mayonnaise and placed it in a squirt bottle so that everyone could pour it over the dogs
  • I did the same with the salsa verde. The result was a drenched dog. My supper was a big hit, thanks to your efforts! There were no leftovers, and two visitors traveled to the University of Arizona. What was I thinking when I assumed they were consumed on a regular basis? Let’s just say that these Sonoran Dogs were the buzz of the town that night. A Southwest Caesar Salad with polenta croutons was served along with Margaritas and three fruit salsas. Haha, I’m in a food coma.

6 Great Sonoran-Style Hot Dogs in Metro Phoenix

Sonoran dogs are a local delicacy in our part of the world, the Southwest. Mayonnaise, tomatoes, beans, onions, and a variety of other condiments are slathered on this bacon-wrapped hot dog before being grilled. Here are six local establishments that serve the Sonoran dog properly, ranging from food carts to restaurants.

The Drowning Taco

Mesa, Arizona, 264 East Broadway Road For more than just drowned tacos, The Drowning Taco is a destination worth seeing. The Sonoran hot dogs at this establishment are fantastic, and they are so generously topped that the chorizo and beans run forward when you bite, exposing the toasted hot dog underneath it. As an added bonus, you may get them topped with carne asada if you so choose. Moreno’s Mexican Grill’s Sonoran hot dog is a popular choice. Heather Hoch is a model and actress who has been in a number of films.

Heather Hoch is a model and actress who has been in a number of films.

Moreno’s Mexican Grill

There are several locations. At Moreno’s in the east Valley, the Sonorans are served on a distinctive fluffy bread and are topped with entire beans, diced onions, grilled onions, tomatoes, jalapeo sauce, mustard, mayo, and bacon, among other ingredients. Moreno’s does, in fact, lay bacon on top of its dogs rather than wrapping them. We wouldn’t normally do anything like this since the bacon is so smokey and delicious, but in this circumstance, we don’t mind. Nogales Hot Dogs is a must-try if you’re in the area.

Traverse is a writer and editor based in New York City.

Teresa K.

Nogales Hot Dogs

There are several locations. When it comes to Sonoran dogs, Nogales Hot Dogs is a local institution to be reckoned with. We gave the Best of Phoenix award to the little stand and tent off 20th Street and Indian School Road (there are additional sites as well); we were impressed with the courteous and prompt service. The stand is also dependable; they serve dogs every evening at that spot, which is a major deal in the Sonoran dog community. The Sonoran hot dog from El Sabroso. “El Sabroso’s Sonoran hot dog,” writes Heather Hoch.

See also:  What Are Bao Buns Made Out Of

El Sabroso

There are several locations. The El Sabrosofood truck is a must-try for anybody visiting the Valley’s culinary scene. When driving along the road, it’s easy to identify the stand because of its enormous red and yellow awning. Despite the fact that El Sabroso utilizes bacon crumbles rather than wrapping the dog, the heavy piling of toppings results in a dog that is bursting at the seams with taste at the bolillo. On hot summer nights, we recommend that you combine the dogs with a refreshing Mexican Coke or Fanta.

Sonoran hot dogs are a specialty of Micky’s Hot Dogs in Scottsdale, Arizona. Heather Hoch “>Micky’s Hot Dogs’ Sonoran hot dog is a variation on the Sonoran hot dog. Heather Hoch is a model and actress who has been in a number of films.

Micky’s Hot Dogs

Mesa’s address is 108 West Broadway Road. Connoisseurs of Sonoran hot dogs know Micky’s Hot Dogs for the constant quality of its products. In this case, the dog has been properly charred, the bun has been toasted, and the whole thing has been lavished with vibrant squiggles of mustard and other condiments. This downtown Mesa establishment, which has been in operation since 1995, is ideal for a fast bite to eat, especially during the late hours.

La Pasadita Hot Dogs

There are several locations. La Pasadita is a popular hot dog stand in the West Valley that serves a wide variety of hot dogs. Here, the Sonora is served with a bacon-wrapped hot dog and beans as well as grilled onions and tomatoes as well as condiments such as mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard, guacamole, and jalapeo sauce. The use of freshly roasted chiles, a strong bacon taste, and a variety of salsa choices make this one of the greatest Sonorans in the city. Note from the editor: This story was first published on June 20, 2016, and has been updated.

In our Phoenix Restaurant Directory, you can find out which Valley establishments provide takeaway, delivery, and dine-in services.

How Tucson Restaurants Make Sonoran Hot Dogs

Many people are aware that in Chicago, you don’t add ketchup on your hot dog, and that in New York City, they like sauerkraut and spicy mustard on their wieners. Tucson eateries, on the other hand, specialize in a particular type of hot dog known as the Sonoran, which is only widely recognized inside the city. Tradition holds that the dog originated in the adjacent town of Hermosillo, which serves as the capital of the Mexican state of Sonora, which explains the dog’s Mexican-inspired toppings.

To learn how to make a Sonoran hot dog, layer by layer, from the bottom up, which is the finest method to put them together, continue reading this article.

1. The bread

Because a conventional hot-dog bun would collapse under the weight of the toppings required by a real Sonoran, most cooks use a bolillo, which is similar to a Mexican baguette but shorter and softer in texture. (You’ve probably seen them employed in the preparation of a torta.) Some recipes call for alternatives in the event that you cannot get a bolillo, such as a lobster or torpedo roll; nonetheless, the bolillo is the finest option by far.

2. The beans

A ladleful of pinto beans prepared in the traditional Mexican method is placed on top of the bolillo. The placement of the beans is critical since their secondary function is to keep both the dog and the bun warm.

3. The meat

Bacon enhances the flavor of everything, and this dog is no exception.

Wrapping the hot dog in bacon strips securely prevents any pink from showing through. The hot dogs are then roasted until the bacon is just starting to brown and adheres to the hot dog, providing a smokey taste to the hot dog.

4. The veggies

A variety of fresh onions, including crisp fresh onions and sweet grilled onions, chopped tomatoes, and sometimes bits of avocado, are piled on top of the dog.

5. The sauces

It is customary for Mexican crema (a lighter kind of sour cream), mustard, and jalapeño sauce to be drizzled on top of the entire dog, bun included. The process is frequently done in an artistic, Jackson Pollock–esque fashion.

6. The side

The Sonoran is maybe the only regional dog that comes with a distinct accompaniment: a spicy roasted guero chili, which is served on top or alongside the dog, is not complete without it. In Tucson, as you’ve already guessed, this classic is served in some of the city’s most popular and greatest restaurants. Here are a few to have a look at:

  • El Güero Canelo: This restaurant, which specializes in Mexican food, is known for serving the greatest Sonoran hot dogs, which have been rated the best by publications such as Tucson Weekly. BK Carne Asada and Hot Dogs: Mesquite firewood enhances the smoky flavor of the Sonoran dog, which was named the best in the country by the Travel Channel
  • BK Carne Asada and Hot Dogs: Mesquite firewood enhances the smoky flavor of the Sonoran dog, which was named the best in the country by the Travel Channel
  • Take your dog to Taqueria Aqui Con El Nene, where you may sit at one of the picnic tables provided by this renowned food truck and enjoy it with toasted tacos and papanchas

How To Make Mexican Hot Dog Sonoran Hot Dog

With veggies, Pico de Gallo, and a variety of sauces, this dish is a must-try. Put the hot dogs in an abolillo and you’ve got yourself a fantastic Sonoran hot dog. Ready to learn how to prepare Mexican hot dogs? Do you have what it takes to succeed? Let’s get this party started!

What Is A Mexican Hot Dog?

Even though these hot dogs may be found on the streets of Los Angeles, they are actually from Hermosillo, the capital of the Mexican state of Sonora. Sonoran dog varieties may be found online, but as with many other items, you should customize them to your preference and top them with your favorite toppings. We can create our own pico de gallo and other sauces, but the street sellers sell these bacon-wrapped hot dogs that are stuffed with onions, peppers, avocado, and other toppings that we can purchase from them.

Bolillo Buns

Serve your hot dog on handmade bolillo bread rolls to enhance the flavor of this meal even more. The top of your bolillo bread can be chopped off, or you can slice it lengthwise to fit the Sonoran hot dog inside.

Mexican Hot Dog Ingredients

To create these delicious hot dogs, you’ll need a few different ingredients. Organize your grocery list by including the following ingredients:

  • Hot dogs
  • Bolillo buns or hot dog buns
  • Bacon strips
  • Pickled jalapenos
  • Onion
  • Bell pepper
  • Vegetable oil
  • Pico de gallo
  • Bolillo buns or hot dog buns Salinity
  • Ketchup, yellow mustard, and mayonnaise, to be used as condiments

How To Make Sonoran Hot Dogs

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Wrap a strip of bacon around each hot dog tightly until the hot dog is completely coated with bacon. Place the hot dogs on a baking sheet coated with aluminum foil and bake for 15 minutes. Roast the hot dogs for about 25 minutes, or until the bacon is browned on the outside. Prepare a big skillet by heating it over medium heat and adding 1 tablespoon of oil to it. Slice the onion, bell pepper, and jalapeño pepper into thin slices. Continue to stir until the mixture is soft and transparent.

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the tomatoes, avocado, red onion, cilantro, and lime juice.

Cut the bolillo buns in half lengthwise, down the middle, and serve.

Fill the bread with a spoonful of the onion mixture. Then place the bacon-wrapped hot dog on top of the salad and garnish with pico de gallo and chopped avocado, if desired. Dress the burgers with ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise to taste. Serve as soon as possible.

Can You Make Mexican Hot Dogs On The Grill?

The hot dogs can be cooked on the grill instead of being roasted like traditional hot dogs with bacon wrappers. Wrap each hot dog individually with bacon and fasten the bacon at either end of the hot dog with a bamboo skewer or toothpick to form a bundle. Grill the hot dogs over a low fire, turning them frequently, until the bacon is browned and the bacon is crisp. Alternatively, you may bake them on anUno Casa cast-iron griddle or grill pan in the same manner.

How To Store Leftover Sonoran hot dog Mexican Hot Dogs

These Mexican Sonoran hot dogs may be kept in the refrigerator. You have a number of possibilities. Ensure that the hot dogs are totally cold before putting them in any container. The simplest method of storing leftover hot dogs is to keep the hot dogs separate from the buns as follows:

  • Keep these hot dogs in the refrigerator if you want to serve them within a day or two after preparing them. As a precaution, store them in an airtight food container to prevent the bread and hot dogs from drying out. If you want to keep them for a lengthy period of time, put them in the freezer. Either in a Ziploc bag or in a freezer-safe food container would suffice. If the bread has once been frozen, it should not be refrozen a second time.

How To Reheat Leftover Hot Dogs

There are various options for reheating the hot dogs:

  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees for 5 minutes or until the leftover cooked hot dogs are heated. Air Fryer– If you have an Air Fryer, you can also reheat the hot dogs in it. To reheat the bacon-wrapped hot dogs, preheat your Air Fryer to 375°F and cook for 3 minutes or until they are warm. Alternatively, a cast-iron pan can be used to cook the hot dogs on the stovetop. Heat the cast-iron skillet on medium heat so that the hot dogs may warm up gradually
  • Otherwise, the bacon would get quite black and hard.

More Mexican Hot Dog Toppings

You may customize your Sonoran hot dog with a variety of delicious toppings, including:

  • Pinto beans
  • Roasted tomatoes
  • Refried beans
  • Red onions
  • Roasted tomato salsa
  • Hot sauce
  • Cotija cheese
  • Queso fresco
  • Sour cream
  • Fresh cilantro
  • Pickled onions
  • Pickled peppers

More Bread Recipes

If you enjoy this hot dog recipe, you’ll love these additional bread recipes that you can discover on the Tortilla Channel:

  • Chipotle cheesy garlic bread, tortilla hot dogs, Croque monsieur, pull-apart bread, vegan Turkish bread sandwich, Pan con Tomate, grilled cheese bacon sandwich, avocado toast

I hope you will give this delicious Mexican hot dog dish a try! Make a dish and tag @thetortillachannel on Instagram, PIN on Pinterest, and LIKE us on Facebook for more information and up-to-the-minute recipes. NOT FORGET TO SIGN UP FOR THETORTILLA CHANNEL NEWSLETTER FOR FREE TO RECEIVE NOTIFICATIONS WHEN NEW RECIPES ARE ADDED TO THE CHANNEL! It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. Please refer to myPrivacy Policy for further details. The Mexican hot dog, also known as the street dog or the Sonoran hot dog, is a dish that has it all.

Ingredients

  • Bolillo buns (four), four hot dogs (four), four bacon strips (one tablespoon finely chopped pickled jalapenos), one tablespoon vegetable oil (four). 1 medium-sized onion, finely sliced
  • 1/2 cup pico de Gallo
  • 1/2 small red bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 small red onion, thinly sliced Salinity
  • Ketchup, yellow mustard, and mayonnaise, to be used as condiments

Instructions

600 calories; 28 grams of fat; 66 grams of carbohydrates; 22 grams of protein

8 Awesome Sonoran Hot Dogs In Tucson

Tucson, like Chicago and New York, has its own distinctive style of hot dog that is much enjoyed. Originally from Hermosillo, Mexico, the Sonoran hot dog is a combination of a somewhat sweet bread, a bacon-wrapped wiener with pinto beans and onions, a tomato with salsa verde, mustard, and mayonnaise, and pinto beans with onions. The basic with a toasted bun is preferred by Tucsonans above variations that add sliced mushrooms, grated cheese, or crushed potato chips, among other things. Others believe that the ratio of components is what makes or breaks a hot dog, while some believe that an unique touch is necessary when toasting the bread.

Aqui Con El Nene

Aqui con el Nene serves up Sonoran hot dogs. (Photo courtesy of Jackie Tran) Sonoran dogs are served chipilón-style at this northwest institution, with cheese melted into the bun before serving. In addition, don’t miss out on the Taco Yaqui, which consists of two corn tortillas loaded with carne asada, mushrooms, and melty cheese and baked in an oven till golden brown on the outside. For further information, please see www.aquiconelnene.com.

BK Tacos

BK Tacos on 12th Avenue serves carnitas asada tacos and a Sonoran dog. (Photo courtesy of Jackie Tran) BK is one of two Sonoran dog legends in town, and he also cooks other meats on the mesquite grill, including ribs and brisket.

Try the guacamole with cottage cheese at the salsa bar to see what all the fuss is about. You might be surprised by what you discover. For additional information, please see www.bktacos.com/about-us.

El Güero Canelo

El Guero Canelo serves up Sonoran hot dogs (Credit: Jackie Tran) El Güero Canelo is the second half of the two dueling Sonoran dog legends in Tucson, and it has three sites in the area. It is the recipient of the James Beard Foundation’s “America’s Classics” award for 2018, and for good cause. Order theSammy Dogif you want two franks in a single roll. In the Phoenix area, you may find them at 5131 W. McDowell Rd., Phoenix, AZ 85035 if you’re in need of some Sonoran cuisine. More information may be found at www.lguerocanelo.com.

El Sinaloense

El Sinaloense5 Hot Dogs is a Sonoran hot dog vendor. (Photo courtesy of Jackie Tran) Despite the fact that there are other El Sinaloense trucks scattered across the city, the one at 1526 N. Alvernon Way has the magic touch that has garnered the most loyal following. We haven’t figured out why this is happening yet, but we can say that the dog is very well-balanced. For further information, please see El Sinaloense’s Yelp page.

El Perro Loco

Super Chipilones are a kind of chipilone that is extremely large. El Perro Loco serves up Sonoran hot dogs. (Photo courtesy of Jackie Tran) The Super Chipilones are made with toasted buns that have been liberally sprinkled with garlic powder for a flavorful taste. Follow El Perro Loco Hot Dogs on Facebook to stay up to date.

La Carreta del Rorro

Sonoran hot dogs with chorizo are served at La Carreta del Rorro restaurant. (Photo courtesy of Jackie Tran) The mayonnaise is distributed differently at La Carreta; instead of drizzling the mayonnaise over the tomatoes, it is smeared. When the guero chile is served with the loaded dog, there is what appears to be Tajin sprinkled on top, which gives a nice lime acidity to contrast with the laden dog. You can put chorizo on top for $0.50, which is a little but significant increase. The crumbly, salty bits on top add a meaty savoriness to those nibbles where you would ordinarily receive a bun but not a hot dog, and they are also good for dipping.

See also:  What To Do With Pretzel Buns

Karamelo King

Despite the fact that the sweets and piata shop is no longer open, the food truck continues to operate in the same location on weekends. Come for the baked buns with melting cheese on the interior. On Instagram, you can find out more about Karmelo King by following his page.

Ruiz Hot Dogs

Ruiz Hot-Dogs serves a chipilones-style hot dog. (Photo courtesy of Jackie Tran) Customers keep going back for more of the fluffy buns baked with butter. There is shaded seating available both adjacent to the truck and within the truck itself. Yelp has a page dedicated to Ruiz Hot Dogs where you can find out more. Where do you get your favorite Sonoran hot dog while you are in town? Please share your thoughts in the comments section. Check out our article on the Best Raspado Spots in Tucson if you’re looking for something a little sweeter.

The Sonoran Hot Dog in Tucson: 14 places for delicious bacon-wrapped happiness

This post includes affiliate links for your convenience. If you make a purchase after clicking on one of these links, we may get a commission at no additional cost to you. The most recent update was made on April 30, 2021. Tucson’s Sonoran hot dog is more than just a typical ballpark snack. This simply called gastronomic pleasure is the recipient of a James Beard Award for excellence in the culinary arts.

All of these flavors and cultures are packed within a fluffy bollilo roll, which makes it a complete meal in and of itself. Continue reading to discover more about the history of the Sonoran hot dog, as well as where you can get your hands on one.

What, exactly,isa Sonoran Hot Dog in Tucson?

It is possible to earn commissions from this post. You will not be charged any additional fees if you choose to purchase something after clicking on one of these links. 30th of April, 2021 (latest update). It is not a basic ballpark snack, but rather an experience in itself. It is the recipient of a James Beard Award for its eponymously called gastronomic treat. All of these flavors and cultures are packed within a fluffy bollilo roll, which makes it a complete meal in and of themselves. Continue reading to find out more about the history of the Sonoran hot dog, as well as where you can get your hands on one for yourself.

  • A hot dog covered in bacon
  • Pinto beans
  • Chopped fresh tomatoesonions (or pico de gallo)
  • Jalapenos
  • Mustardmayonnaise
  • A bacon-wrapped hot dog
  • A bolillo roll (preferably with the top split)
  • As an added bonus, a grilled guero chile is served on the side.

Evolution of a cross-border street food classic

The precise origin of the Sonoran hot dog is disputed, as is the case with many other culinary classics. They initially appeared in the 1960s, most likely in the adjacent Mexican state of Sonora, where they are still prevalent today. Due to the fact that this region is only 70 miles south of Tucson, tastes and people are constantly moving between the two cities. Tucson is located in the Sonoran desert, which is a geographical feature that is shared by both Mexico and the United States. In Mexico, a traditional hot dog cart is known as a carreta.

  1. Back then, you’d never see these hotdogs on the streets of Tucson.” These street food favorites made their way north into the United States sometime in the previous 30-40 years.
  2. The carretas, as they are known in Tucson, may be found on street corners throughout the city.
  3. You may be able to get a seat at one of the few outdoor seats and tables spread around the front yard.
  4. In certain cases, carretas have “graduated” to the status of restaurants, where you may dine inside.

El Guero Canelo: Tucson’s Sonoran hot dog “ambassador”

Locals will dispute about where to locate the greatest version of this dish, just as they will about any other great regional cuisine staple. Regardless of personal choice, Daniel Contreras is without a doubt the most effective spokesperson for the Sonoran hot dog. Contreras is the owner of El Guero Canelo, a mini-chain of eateries in Tucson that specializes in the Sonoran hot dog (also known as the Sonoran dog). “El Guero” was founded as a food cart in the early 1990s in south Tucson by Contreras, who wanted to stay true to the Sonoran hot dog’s origins.

  1. However, as the popularity of the cart increased, so did the notoriety of El Guero Canelo.
  2. As a result, a hot dog became legendary.
  3. The original cart is prominently displayed in the front yard.
  4. “We didn’t sell hot dogs in the beginning of the business.” We were in the business of selling carne asada.
  5. We were in the business of selling carne asada.
  6. El Guero Canelo, Daniel Contraras, El Guero Canelo Contreras currently operates three restaurants in and around Tucson, as well as a meat store in the same building as his first South Tucson establishment.
  7. That’s a great example of hot dog entrepreneurship!
  8. Take note of the Bolillo rolls that are divided at the top.

Those bolillo rolls, which are thick and fluffy, are a trademark of “El Guero”: thick and fluffy bolillo rolls. The top of these rolls is slit across the middle, forming a “boat” in which to nestle the hot dog and its large pile of toppings. This is different from traditional hot dog rolls.

Where to get Sonoran hot dogs in Tucson, AZ

The following is a list of some of our favorite places to get a Sonoran hot dog in Tucson (in alphabetical order). We’ve always been pleased with the mouthwatering flavor of Tucson at each of these establishments. If you’re feeling very ambitious (or hungry), you might make a mini-road trip out of it and visit many different restaurants. You won’t cover as much ground as you would on an Arizona Route 66 Road Trip, but you will cover a lot of ground nevertheless!

Aqui con El Nene

Tucson’s “El Nene” is a favored hangout for Sonran dogs, according to locals. Aqui con el Nene Tucson is lovingly referred to as “El Nene” by the locals, who believe it to be the best Sonoran hot dog in the entire city. It’s a well-known destination in northern Tucson that fits within the hybrid-cart classification. An enormous mobile food truck has been positioned in front of what used to be a restaurant/bar. A covered outside pavilion as well as the old restaurant provide seating options. (There’s also a modern brick-and-mortar store on the south side of town.) An enormous condiment bar, which contains enough fresh and marinated vegetables to make a side dish to accompany your dog, is also available at the establishment.

  • Locations (2): North Tucson, with a second facility in South Tucson as a backup. A food truck with inside and outdoor seating may be found at the original location (north). 65 W. Valencia Rd., 4415 N Flowing Wells Rd., 4415 N Flowing Wells Rd.

BK Tacos

BK’s Tucson is another another brick-and-mortar institution in the city, with two locations. Although the restaurant was originally known as BK’s Carne AsadaHot Dogs, the name change reflects the company’s increasing emphasis on a range of Mexican dishes. The Sonoran hot dog had all of the necessary elements, but we were underwhelmed by the bun, which was neither toasted nor strong enough to hold up to the colossal amounts of contents.

  • (1) South Tucson
  • (2) a second location north of downtown
  • Category:Restaurant
  • Address:5118 S 12th Ave
  • (2) Locations:

Calle Tepa Mexican Street GrillBar

Calle Tepa is a casual brick-and-mortar restaurant that serves this Sonoran favorite in a somewhat more upmarket setting than the typical Sonoran establishment (i.e. you both order and eat indoors.) In order to maintain the “street food” idea, you place your order at a food counter that has been transformed from a street cart. The rolls are substantial enough to support the dog for the rest of the meal, and the pico de gallo that is provided on top is always made with stunning red ripe tomatoes and fresh cilantro to ensure that the dog stays happy.

Calle Tepa also has a bar in the back for those who want to wash down their Sonoran hot dog with a Margarita or a cerveza.

  • Southeast Tucson
  • Category:Restaurant
  • Address:6151 E Broadway Blvd
  • Location:Southeast Tucson

El Guero Canelo

If you’re just going to grab one Sonoran hot dog while you’re in Tucson, this is the spot to go. (C’mon! It was nominated for a James Beard Award!) The initial location was a concession stand, which has now been transformed to incorporate inside seating. The restaurant has seen an increase in traffic and glamor as a result of its celebrity status: guests now receive pagers to notify them when their meal is ready, and a film of the James Beard Awards plays on a loop in the dining room.

Although the custom-made Mexican buns are not toasty, the dogs are nonetheless delectable regardless of the situation. Tucson now has two extra sites (and one in Phoenix.)

  • You should go here if you’re just going to grab one Sonoran hot dog while in Tucson. (C’mon! A James Beard Award was given to this dish. A concession stand that has evolved to incorporate inside seats was the original location. Affluence has introduced a slew of new features, including pagers that notify customers when their meal is ready and a video of the James Beard Awards that plays on a loop in the dining room. Although the custom-made Mexican buns are not toasty, the dogs are nonetheless delectable notwithstanding. The city of Tucson has two other places (and one in Phoenix.)

El Sinaloense Hot Dog Cart

Despite its name (Sinaloa is the state in Mexico that is directly south of Sonora), this cart with tables in Tucson dishes up a typical Sonoran dog that has been passed down through generations. The ambiance is classiccareta; customers sit at folding tables and chairs snuggled under a canvas umbrella in the heart of a vacant corner lot where the restaurant is located. The dogs are served on a perfectly toasted bun, with a side of typical roasted pepper on the side of the bun.

  • Located in East Tucson, in the Carreta category, with an address of 1526 N Alvernon Way.

Hot DogsLa Reyna

La Reyna is a hybrid food cart/restaurant: seating is provided within a storefront in a tiny strip mall, while the “kitchen” is a food truck parked in front of the establishment. It is a typical form of the famous Sonoran hot dog in Tucson, with the bacon-wrapped dog being crisp and the bread being cooked in butter on the griddle before being served. When we’re in the mood for something truly decadent, we orderChipiloneshot dogs. Basically, they are the same dogs as before, but with cheese melted on top-OH YEAH!

  • Location:North Tucson, just off 1st Avenue
  • Address:704 E Prince Rd, Tucson, AZ 85719
  • Category:Carreta with adjacent indoor seating
  • Location:North Tucson, just off 1st Avenue

If you enjoy cheese on your Sonoran hot dog, request “Chipilones” (cheese on the bun).

Los Ponchos

Thiscarreta, or cart, may be seen on a street corner about 3 miles north of the University of Arizona’s main campus. An arrangement of tables and chairs beneath a canopy next to the cart represents a classic Sonoran hot dog stand in Tucson. It is well-liked by both students and staff members. Additionally, Los Ponchos serves a “queso-dogo,” which is a hot dog-filled quesadilla, in addition to the Sonoran-style hot dog. If you really must have a tortilla with your frank, this is the recipe for you.

  • Location:Approximately 3 miles north of the University of Arizona, near Midtown
  • Address:1901 E Fort Lowell Rd, Tucson, AZ 85719
  • Category:Food truck with outdoor seating
  • Location:About 3 miles north of the University of Arizona, in Midtown

The Quesadillas

When paired with a Sonoran hot dog, the handmade salsas at The Quesadillas make for a satisfying meal. The quesadillas are the main attraction of this eatery in eastern Tucson, which explains the name. However, in response to client requests, they have now added a hot dog to the menu—yay! In Tucson, the iconic Sonoran hot dog has been given a modern twist by owner Marcos Barragan. He makes all-beef franks and omits the beans from the recipe. Rather than wrapping the franks in bacon, Barragan prefers to top them with “bacon bits.” Contrary to what the title implies, these “bits” are enormous chunks of chopped bacon that have been sprinkled on top of the dish.

(We really enjoyed the jalapeño guacamole and pineapple chiltepin, which were both delicious.) We were so engrossed in them that we almost forgot about the rest of the food on the menu.

They will, upon request, grill your hot dog right there on the spot.

  • An authentic Sonoran hot dog can be paired with one of the restaurant’s housemade salsas. There are quesadillas as the main attraction at this restaurant in eastern Tucson, thus the name. However, in response to client demands, a hot dog has been added to the menu—yay! In Tucson, the original Sonoran hot dog has been given a modern twist by the proprietor, Marcos Barragan. In place of the beans, he uses all-beef franks. “Bacon bits” are used to top the franks rather than bacon slices, according to Barragan. Make no mistake about it, these “pieces” are actually huge chunks of diced bacon that have been sprinkled on top. The salsas were produced by Alex Barragan’s daughter Alex and were served with mustard, mayonnaise, and chopped tomatoes, among other things! Our favorite dishes included jalapeño guacamole and pineapple chiltepin (which we particularly enjoyed). It was almost as if we had forgotten about the rest of the food on the menu since they were so excellent! Insider’s tip: The quesadillas are grilled entirely over mesquite wood at the establishment. It is possible to get your hot dog grilled on site if you request it.

Ruiz Hot Dogs/Los Chipilones

Tucson’s Ruiz Sonoran hot dog carreta is a must-visit. The Ruiz cart serves you a Sonoran hot dog that is as authentic as they get in Tucson. Place your order and then take a seat on one of the few stools available. The cart may be found at a corner property in the southern part of Tucson. Because the setting is so simple, the food must be very delicious to justify the price. Gerardo was working his magic right in front of us. The hot dog was moist and flavorful, and the bacon was properly crisped around it.

In addition, he cooked the roll to perfection, ensuring that it could withstand his colossal toppings. It is worth noting that the family has opened a brick-and-mortar shop with outdoor seating on the neighboring lot, where they sell tacos, quesadillas, and breakfast items.

  • Locations (2): South Tucson (just south of downtown)
  • North Tucson (just north of downtown)
  • Carreta with seats is a category. Located at 1140 S 6th Ave, as well as at a brick and mortar shop next door
  • And

Is it true that these establishments provide the greatest Sonoran hot dogs in Tucson? But who knows? They could turn out to be as amazing as we believe. Every day, there are new establishments to discover. Please let us know if you come across a copy. One of our favorite forms of street food is these bacon-wrapped beauties, which are wrapped in bacon. Any time we can get our hands on a Sonoran hot dog, we’re all in! WHAT IF YOU ENJOYED THIS POST AND WOULD LIKE TO SHARE IT ON YOUR PINTEREST BOARDS?

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