What Dessert Goes With Korean Food

13 Best Korean Desserts (Traditional and Modern)

13 of the best Korean sweets, ranging from traditional to contemporary. Discover tried-and-true recipes for traditional favorites such as sweet rice cakes and tea biscuits suitable for a king or queen. Also, have a good time replicating renowned street treats like shaved ice and sponge sweets in your own kitchen. Thirteen of the best Korean desserts – from traditional to contemporary Do you have a sweet tooth, or do you avoid sweets? Make these traditional and trendy Korean sweet delicacies to share with your friends!

One or more of these dishes may be traced back to the royal court, while others gained fame as a common street meal, and yet others are Korean fusion sweets that have just recently become famous among Korean American communities.

There are also gluten-free and vegan alternatives available on a regular basis.

They are often prepared and served at special events such as the Korean Lunar New Year (seeLunar New Year meals) and the harvest festival of Chuseok (see Harvest Festival cuisines).

Songpyeon (Rice Cakes)

Songpyeon is a Korean actor (Korean rice cakes) Teok rice powder, kabocha squash, matcha green tea powder, sesame seeds, and dried mung beans are the primary components. Preparation time: 6 hours (mostly for soaking rice) Preparation time: 24 minutes Known as Songpyeon in Korea, this rice cake is created with 100 percent short grain rice cake dough that is filled with a variety of ingredients before being hand-shaped and steamed. In Korea, during the harvest festival of Chuseok, a special delicacy is prepared at home to commemorate the year’s abundant harvest and to celebrate the new year.

(GF and V)

Yaksik 약식 (Sweet Rice Dessert)

Yaksik is an abbreviation for Yaksik (Korean sweet rice dessert) Sweet rice, chestnuts, dried jujubes, and pine nuts are the primary components. Preparation time: 1 hour Preparation time: 1 hour Korean delicacy created from sweet rice and including elements that are good for you, such as jujube, chestnuts, and pine nuts is shown here. If you want an even faster variation, try my Instant Pot Yaksikrecipe, which uses a pressure rice cooker to cut down on cooking time compared to most conventional recipes that rely on the steaming process.

Bukkumi(Pan-fried Rice Cake Dumplings with Sweet Red Beans)

Yansik is an abbreviation for Yaksik (Yaksik is a kind of lizard) (Korean sweet rice dessert) Sweet rice, chestnuts, dried jujubes, pine nuts, and raisins are the primary components. 1 hour for preparation 1 hour to prepare Korean dish created from sweet rice and including elements that are good for you, such as jujube, chestnuts, and pine nuts is featured here.

This recipe employs a pressure rice cooker, which reduces the cooking time compared to most conventional recipes that use the steaming technique; however, if you need an even faster alternative, check my Instant Pot Yaksikrecipe. In the case of GF and V,

Dasik (Tea Cookies)

Dasik is a slang term for dasik (Korean Tea Cookies) Sesame seeds, rice syrup, honey, rice flour, and matcha powder are the primary components. Time required for preparation: 30 minutes Preparation time: 5 minutes These traditional tea biscuits are mostly prepared with sesame seeds, rice flour, or soya bean flour, depending on the region. White, brown, and black sesame seeds provide the natural hues, while matcha green tea powder adds a subtle green tint to the finished product. Watch my Dasik video and try to create these melt-in-your-mouth cookies as soon as you possibly can!

Yakgwa 약과 (Honey Pastry)

Yakwa is an abbreviation for Yakwa (Korean honey pastry) The following are the primary ingredients: pastry flour, sesame oil, soju, honey, pine nuts, and ginger. Time required for preparation: 30 minutes Approximately 40 minutes to prepare Yakhgwa holds a special place in my heart among Korean desserts because I discovered that this sweet treat was created by an ancestor of my husband’s more than 400 years ago, and I’m fortunate to have learned to make it from my mother in law using her family’s original recipe.

This delicious pastry is prepared into layers, deep-fried, and then soaked in a thick ginger and honey syrup before being served as an appetizer.

(V)

Sujeonggwa (Cinnamon Ginger Punch)

Sujeonggwa is a Korean word that means “successful” (Korean cinnamon ginger punch) Ingredients that are essential: Ingredients: water, fresh ginger, and cinnamon sticks Time required for preparation: 5 minutes Approximately 25 minutes to prepare The cinnamon and ginger in this dessert drink, which is best enjoyed in the winter with a handful of dried persimmon, help to keep the cold at bay. Furthermore, because it contains ginger, it is an excellent digestive help after a heavy holiday dinner.

Sikhye 식혜 (Sweet Rice Punch)

Sungjeonggwa () is a Korean word that means “adventurous” (Korean cinnamon ginger punch) Among the most important components are the following: Fresh ginger and cinnamon sticks are added to water. Minutes Required for Preparation: 5 20-25 minutes to prepare Spices like cinnamon and ginger, combined with dried persimmon, make this dessert drink a great way to keep the winter chill at bay. Aside from that, the presence of ginger makes it a wonderful digestive aid after a heavy holiday dinner. Keep an eye on this Sujeonggwa video to see how this delicious Korean delicacy may be frozen and served granita style!

Bungeoppang 붕어빵 (Fish-shaped Bread with Sweet Red Bean)

Bungeoppang is a Japanese word that means “bungeoppang is a bunch of bungeoppangs” (Korean fish-shaped bread with sweet red bean) Components: all-purpose flour, sweet rice flour, egg, milk, and sweet red beans are the primary ingredients. ten minutes for preparation Preparation time: 20 minutes Bungeoppang is a Korean dessert that is sure to be a favorite with the kids.

It is produced by baking a pancake-like batter in a fish-shaped mold and filling it with a delicious red bean filling in the centre. On the outside, the dough is somewhat crispy, while on the interior, it is chewy and spongy, with a burst of sweetness provided by the red beans.

Hotteok 호떡 (Sweet Pancake)

Bungeoppang is a Japanese word that means “bungeoppang is a bunch of bungeoppangs” in English (Korean fish-shaped bread with sweet red bean) Sweet red beans, all-purpose flour, sweet rice flour, egg and milk are among the main components. ten minutes to prepare Approximately 20 minutes of preparation time Cooked in a fish-shaped mold and filled with a delicious red bean filling, Bungeoppang is sure to be a favorite with the youngsters. Bungeoppang is an easy dessert to make that everyone will enjoy.

Sweet Rice Mini Bundt Cake

Mini bundt cake with sweet rice filling Ingredients: brown sweet rice flour, sweet rice flour, whole milk, unsalted butter, egg, sweet red bean paste, brown sugar, brown sugar, brown sugar Time required for preparation: 15 minutes Preparation time: 35 minutes My originalTteokppangrecipe, a Korean fusion delicacy cooked in the oven, is the inspiration for this sweet rice mini bundt cake recipe, which is naturally gluten-free and made with sweet rice.

It is the use of sweet rice flour instead of wheat flour that distinguishes this cake from others, and this particular recipe calls for rice flour that has been freshly milled at home.

Bingsu 빙수 (Shaved Ice)

Bingsu is a Japanese word that means “successful” (Korean shaved ice) Ice, sweet red beans, and condensed milk are the primary components. Time required for preparation: 5 minutes Preparation time: 3 minutes Bingsu, also known as Korean shaved ice dessert, is probably the most well-known of all Korean sweets outside of Korea. It will chill you off like no other dessert can. While red beans, misugaru (roasted multigrain powder), and sweetened condensed milk are the traditional toppings for this Korean shaved ice dish, you may customize it with other fruits such as watermelon.

This is a delicious and refreshing treat for hot summer days!

Dalgona 달고나 (Sponge Candy)

Dalgona is a fictional character created by author Dalgona (Korean sponge candy) Sugar, baking soda, and vegetable oil are the primary components. Time required for preparation: 3 minutes Preparation time: 5 minutes Enjoy this delicious Korean street cuisine that will bring out the child in you. All you need are three ingredients to make a gently crunchy yet melt-in-your-tongue sweet with a toasted caramel flavor that will melt in your lips. It is very simple to build; watch the video on myDalgona to see the magic in action.

Makgeolli Ice Cream

Makgeolli ice cream is a Korean dessert. Makgeolli, whole milk, and heavy whipping cream are the primary components. Time required for preparation: 5 minutes Approximately 25 minutes to prepare Light and moderately sweet, this beautiful ice cream is midway between sorbet and full creamy ice cream, with a trace of the delicate sour flavor of Korean rice wine, Makgeolli, in the background. There is no need for an ice cream machine to produce this recipe. (GF) This holiday season, may these traditional and trendy Korean delicacies bring you and your loved ones much happiness and prosperity.

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Top 25 Korean Desserts & Sweets: from Traditional to Modern

When you say “dessert” in Korean, you are referring to the food you have after a big meal. Tradition has it that seasonal fruits are the most popular treats among Koreans: strawberries in the spring, watermelons and yellow melons in the summer, apples and pears in the autumn and winter. After a meal, tea and coffee are both popular beverages to sip on afterward. In recent years, however, thanks to globalization, western sweets including as cakes and macarons, chocolates, biscuits, and other confections have been widely available in Korea.

Let me introduce you to 25 iconic Korean sweets, ranging from traditional Korean desserts to modern desserts that have been reinterpreted in a Korean manner.

Traditional Korean Desserts

Due to the fact that rice is a mainstay of Korean cuisine and is never absent from a Korean’s table, many sweets are based on it as well as numerous other grains and grains. Drinks are also considered to be a traditional dessert in Korea. Seasonal fruits are also excellent components for sweets when they are in season. In line with the development of the tea drinking culture in Korea, beverages are now considered to be a traditional dessert in the country. Traditional desserts may be divided into three categories: rice and other grains, seasonal fruits, and drinks.

RiceOther Grains

Korea’s rice cakes, tteok, are shown in the photo below. Although it is uncertain when rice cakes were first produced and consumed in Korea, it is assumed that they originated with primitive farming practices. Rice cakes have been a staple of Korean festivities for decades, and they are served at large gatherings, traditional holidays, and simply when visitors come. Cooking rice cakes (also known as sticky rice cakes) is a method of preparing grains by steaming or grinding them. Potato starch or other grains are also used, and a variety of substances are added to provide the finished product flavor and form, as well as color.

2. 화전 (Hwajeon: Pan-fried Sweet Rice Cakes with Flower Petals)

Hujeon () is a pan-fried glutinous rice cake made from glutinous rice flour dough that is formed into a round and flat shape and decorated with different flowers depending on the season; for example, azaleas are used in the spring, roses are used in the summer, and chrysanthemums are used in the autumn. Hwajeon is not only beautiful, but it is also packed with nutrients like as vitamins and minerals! Some flowers contain up to 100 times the amount of antioxidant polyphenols or flavonoids found in vegetables and fruits than vegetables and fruits.

3. 약과 (Yakgwa: Korean Honey Cookies)

Yak () is a medical term, while Gwa () is a food term, respectively. So, Yakgwa is a snack meal that is also therapeutic in nature, as the name suggests. Honey and oil were once employed as remedies, which is why it was given this name in the first place.

It is regarded a must-have dish at ceremonies, festivals, feasts, and rituals since it is meticulously prepared with healthful components. It is made by combining honey, oil, and a fine flour powder in a mixing bowl. Then, fried rice and sesame seeds are applied to the exterior of the dish.

4. 호떡 (Hotteok: Korean Sweet Pancakes)

Warm hotteok is a Korean dessert snack composed of cinnamon, brown sugar, and peanuts that is filled with sweet syrup and baked till golden brown. Whenever the weather becomes cold in Korea, it is not difficult to find street vendors offering hotteok (chicken soup). Hotteok is available in a variety of flavors these days, including ice cream and cheese fillings, among other things. If you want to make this popular Korean snack at home, you may purchase a hotteok mix, which makes it incredibly simple to make Korean sweet pancakes at home.

5. 경단 (Gyeongdan: Sweet Rice Balls)

This is a well-known Korean dish that is prepared from grains. It is also a type of glutinous rice cake that is formed by kneading the sticky rice. The rice is formed into little balls and then cooked to make it more tender. The black sesame seeds, mugwort powder, or roasted soy bean powder are then sprinkled on top of the mini rice balls to finish them off. Gyeongdan is created with materials that may be acquired locally, and as a result, several variants have emerged based on the location. For example, residents who live in Gangwon Province, in the mountainous region, substitute mashed potatoes for sticky rice as the primary component in their dishes.

6. 다식 (Dasik: Pressed Sweets)

Grain desserts are quite popular in Korea, and this is one of the most famous of them. Also known as glutinous rice cake, it’s a type of rice cake prepared by kneading glutinous rice. A little amount of rice is molded into small balls and then cooked in a saucepan. The black sesame seed, mugwort powder, or roasted soy bean powder is then sprinkled on top of the mini rice balls to finish them off. In addition, because gyeongdan is produced using components that are readily available in the area, regional variations have emerged.

7. 엿 (Yeot: Sweet Taffy)

Yeot is often cooked with steamed rice, but it may also be made with any other grain, including glutinous rice, sorghum, corn, pumpkin, and sweet potatoes, as well as with any other vegetable. The steamed ingredients are placed in a saucepan filled with water and allowed to boil for an extended period of time. Yeot is given several names based on the basic item used, such as Ssallyeot (), which is made from rice, Hobakyeot (), which is made from pumpkin, and Kkaeyeot (), which is coated with Kkae.

They divide the yeot in half and count the number of holes on each side to determine who will live for the longest period of time.

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8. 강정 (Gangjeong: Crispy Snack)

Yes, yeot is traditionally prepared using steaming rice, but it may also be prepared with any other grain, including glutinous rice, sorghum and other grains such as pumpkin and sweet potatoes. Using a steamer, the ingredients are placed in a pot filled with water and cooked for an extended period of time on the stove. According to the foundation component, there are three types of yeot: Ssallyeot (), made from rice, Hobakyeot (), produced from pumpkin, and Kkaeyeot (), which is topped with Kkae.

Their strategy is to cut each yeot in half and then count the number of holes in each half to determine who will live the longest.

Korean Fruit Based Desserts

Persimmons are found in over 400 different varieties around the world. Only four of the varieties are edible, though. The persimmon is a common fruit in Korea, and it is considered to be one of the most popular fall fruits due to its sweetness. Ice Hongsi is created by freezing a red-ripe persimmon after it has been peeled and pitted. Later on, it transforms into a natural fruit sorbet that is infused with the sweetness of the natural world.

10. 화채 (Hwachae: Traditional Korean Punches)

Hwachae is a famous summer treat created by combining a variety of fruits with cool distilled water to create a refreshing drink. There are around 30 different variants of hwachae, each of which is distinguished by the major fruits used in the recipe. It is also a refreshing and delectable dessert that helps to beat the summer heat, and the seasonal fruits in hawchae help to restore perspiration and enhance the immune system, which is depleted by the summer heat.

Popular Korean Drinks

It is a traditional Korean drink created by simmering ginger and cinnamon with honey or sugar until the dried persimmons and pine nuts float to the top of the liquid. Sujeonggwa was once considered to be a high-end luxury beverage. The fact that cinnamon was not grown on the Korean Peninsula necessitated the importation of the spice, which was also difficult to get in other ways. Sujeonggwa may be thought of as something as rare and precious as a truffle or caviar. Thus, Sujeonggwa was reserved for exceptional occasions, even for the highest-ranking aristocracy, such as royal family ceremonies and other important gatherings.

12. 식혜 (Sikhye: Sweet Korean Rice Beverage)

Sikhye is a traditional sweet drink prepared from malted barley and rice that is fermented. The tastes of the grains contribute to the sweetness of the taste. Sikhye is a digestive aid because to the fact that it is fermented, like yogurt, and has a high amount of fiber. Making sikhye is a time-consuming procedure, but fortunately, canned sikhye can be purchased from shops and supermarkets around Korea for people who want more convenient beverages.

13. 오미자 차 (Omija Cha: Magnolia Berry Tea)

Omija literally translates as ‘five flavors,’ and this tea does really have five distinct flavors: sweet, bitter, sour, spicy, and salty (believe me!). The explanation for this is because omija is a fruit that is unlike any other. Using dried omija that has been sweetened, the tea is created by pouring it in boiling water and allowing it to steep overnight. Because the omija will have been correctly brewed, you will be able to have this ‘treat’ the next morning. Omija tea is especially advised during the summer months, when the hot weather causes individuals to perspire a lot.

14. 매실차 (Maesilcha: Plum Tea)

Plum tea, also known as Maesil, is a traditional Korean beverage (plums). In most cases, it is prepared by combining plum syrup with either hot or cold water.

After a meal, many Koreans enjoy a cup of plum tea as a refreshing and healthful beverage. This is due to the fact that the tea is believed to prevent food poisoning and to have good detoxifying capabilities, which makes it beneficial for digestion.

Modern Korean Desserts and Sweets

Tea brewed from Maesil is known as plum tea in Korea, which is a traditional beverage (plums). It is often created by combining plum syrup with either hot or cold water, depending on the temperature. Drinking a cup of plum tea after dinner is considered a healthful beverage in Korea by many people. This is due to the fact that the tea is believed to prevent food poisoning and to have good detoxifying capabilities, which makes it beneficial for digestive purposes.

15. 팥빙수 (Patbingsu: Shaved Ice with Sweet Rea Beans)

Patbingsu is arguably the most well-known of all Korean sweets outside of Korea, and it is also the most widely available. If you ask a Korean what their favorite summertime dessert is, I can almost promise that they will respond with Bingsu as their response. Patbingsu is the most often practiced form of bingsu. Pat is a term that refers to sweetened red beans that are sprinkled on top of ice flakes. It will have a particular taste if you add chewy rice cake, little chunks of jelly, or soybean powder, among other things.

Patbingsu, on the other hand, is not the only type.

16. 황남빵 (Hwangnambbang: Hwangnam Bread)

Apart from Seoul, there are several more well-known cities in Korea. Gyeongju is an ancient city that has been a part of the Silla dynasty’s history for over a thousand years. In addition to the country’s own culture, Hwangnambbangg, a highly popular Korean delicacy, can be found there. Gyeongju’s Hwangnam-dong neighborhood, which is where this specific bread gets its name, was the site of the initial production of Hwangnam bread in 1939. Hand-mixed red beans, eggs, and wheat dough are used to create this artisan bread, which is then molded and baked without the use of artificial sweeteners or preservatives, retaining just the natural sweetness of the original natural ingredients used.

17. 호두과자 (Hodu-gwaja: Walnut Cookies)

Hodu-gwaja is a Korean folk dance that originated in Cheonan. Hodu is a Korean word that meaning walnut, and these biscuits are packed with red bean paste and walnuts. When it comes to Korean snacks, hodu-gwaja is one of the most popular options. It can be found in rest areas on expressways, where many Koreans stop for a bite to eat. It is possible that some individuals may stop not for a rest, but rather to quench their desires for this popular dessert snack.

18. 빼빼로 (Pepero)

Pepero Pepero is a biscuit stick that has been dipped in chocolate that can be found on most grocery store shelves. It is a well-known snack not only because it is delicious, but also because of its distinctive appearance. Because of the design of the sticks, around 65 percent of annual Pepero sales are generated on ‘Pepero Day,’ which occurs on November 11th: the date, 11/11, is symbolic of the shape of the sticks, as is the shape of the sticks themselves.

People give and receive Pepero as a token of their affection and admiration for one another, as well as for other people.

19. 허니 브래드 (Honey Bread)

Honey bread is a popular delicacy in Korean cafés, and it is made with honey. Honey, caramel syrup, and cinnamon powder are sprinkled on top of thick bread that has been cut into nine sections and filled with whipped cream. Honey Butter Bread was the bread’s original name. Because of its sheer enormity, it always takes people by surprise when they first see it in person. It disappears in an instant, though, once it is scented and eaten. It’s simply that good, and it pairs nicely with both coffee and tea.

20. 인절미 토스트 (Injeolmi Toast: Honey Rice Cake Sandwich)

Among Korean cafe patrons, honey bread is a much sought-after sweet treat. Honey, caramel syrup, and cinnamon powder are sprinkled on top of thick bread that has been cut into nine sections and filled with whipped cream before being baked. Honey Butter Bread was the bread’s original name. Because of its sheer enormity, it always takes people by surprise when they first see it. It disappears, however, as soon as it is smelled and eaten. It’s simply that good, and it works great with both coffee and tea.

21. 달고나 (Dalgona: Korean Sponge Candy)

Dalgona is a confection that tastes a much like honeycomb toffee. It is prepared by melting sugar and a small amount of baking soda together. According to the region, it may also be referred to as ‘ppopgi (poggi)’. Korea’s children enjoyed this dish during the mid- to late 1900s because it was both cheaper and sweeter than conventional sweets available in stores at the time of consumption. Dalgona is frequently sold on the streets of Korea by street vendors. Vendors use different designs to imprint the candy before it solidifies entirely and takes on the shape of a star, fish, or heart, among other things.

22. 계란빵 (Gyeran-ppang: Egg Bread)

Gyeran-ppang is a popular winter dish that many people love with hotteok. It is both sweet and savory at the same time. The dough is produced by combining flour, baking powder, milk, eggs, butter, sugar, and salt in a mixing bowl until well combined. The dough is then placed in the Gyeran-ppang machine, and a whole egg is broken over the bread batter in each slot of the machine before baking. A golden brown crust is achieved by cooking it till golden brown.

23. 붕어빵 (Bungeo-ppang: Korean Fish Shaped Pastry)

Bungeo-ppang is a Korean pastry that is similar to the Japanese dessert Taiyaki, but it is less complicated to make since it just has one filling: sweetened red bean paste. It’s grilled in a mold that looks like a fish. Although bungeo-ppang is often thought of as a winter dessert, there is a way to enjoy it during the hot summer months. There is also a vanilla ice cream variation of bungeo-ppang available, which is known as Bungeo Samanco ( ).

24. 꽈배기 (Kkwabaegi: Twisted Korean Doughnuts)

It’s a basic dish that’s also sweet, fluffy, spongy, and twisted in the middle. It’s also a sentimental dessert for adults because, as youngsters, the majority of them would have purchased kkwabaegi after school after school. Glutinous rice flour and melted butter are used in the preparation of this dish. A coating of sugar and cinnamon powder is applied to the dough before it is deep-fried in oil.

It’s best when it’s hot, as is the case with most fried breads. It is possible to savor the natural taste of twisted bread by eating it immediately after it has been removed from the oil or by heating it up.

25. 뚱카롱 (Ddungcaron: Fat Macaron)

Ddungcaron is a composite word made from of the words ddungddunghada (which means “fat” in Korean) and macaron. Korea’s fascination with macarons began a decade ago, when the French pastry was first brought to the country’s market. Since then, more fillings (almost three times the number of fillings found in an original French macaron) have been introduced. The addition of fruit such as strawberries, as well as the inclusion of cheese or thin crackers, can be made between the two sections.

Yena You

Yena is a native Korean who lives in Seoul, the country’s capital city, and works as a certified tour guide and freelance writer in the city. Dining out and drinking with friends is something she enjoys doing, and she enjoys sharing her gourmet adventures with others.

21 Traditional Korean Desserts

Yena is a native Korean who lives in Seoul, the country’s capital city, and works as a tour guide and freelance writer. Dining out and drinking with friends is something she enjoys doing, and she enjoys sharing her culinary adventures with others.

1.Korean Shaved Ice

This Korean shaved ice delicacy, also known as bingsu, is perfect for cooling you down on a hot summer day! Its most popular form is known as patbingsu, which literally translates as ice shavings with red beans in Japanese. Patbingsu, in addition to the red bean paste, may have various sweet toppings like as chopped fruits, fruit syrup, and condensed milk, among others. You may also try other varieties of this Korean treat, such as Oreo bingsu, if you’re feeling adventurous. Add ice cream or morning cereals to the top for a simple yet entertaining update on the classic.

2.Fish-Shaped Pastry

The red bean filling in this Korean fish-shaped pastry provides a burst of sweetness to the dish. Because of its crunchy borders and chewy inside, it will also thrill your senses with its texture. It is necessary to have a taiyaki pan in the shape of a fish in order to prepare these adorable pastries. Alternatively, serve as is on a wet day or with a glass of milk for a delectable afternoon treat.

3.Korean Poached Pears

A poached pear, known as baesuk in Korean, can be served as a dessert or as a treatment for coughs and sore throats. This poached pear dessert, which is infused with tastes such as peppercorn, ginger, and honey, is one of the most exquisite and healthful sweets you’ll ever taste. While this recipe calls for poaching the pears, you may alternatively use another cooking technique, such as steaming, to prepare them. Would you like to save this recipe? If you provide your your address here, we’ll send you the recipe right to your inbox!

4.Korean Sweet Rice Drink

Who would have imagined that rice could pack such a powerful punch? Barley powder, rice, sugar, and water are all that are required to make this traditional Korean sweet drink. The end product is a slightly sweetened, barley-flavored beverage that you will guzzle down in a matter of seconds. This dish needs only five minutes of preparation time, which is a huge plus! Rest assured that your rice cooker will take care of the rest!

5.Korean Watermelon Punch

The thirst-quenching watermelon serves as the primary component in this refreshing Korean summer beverage. This is the drink to serve during an outdoor summer gathering if you’re searching for something special. If you want to prepare the classic form, use honey or sugar dissolved in water as the foundation.

Use a soft drink instead of water for a lighter version. Adding milk, on the other hand, might make your drink a touch hefty. If you want to make the punch even delicious, feel free to use other fruits such as melon, pineapple, and blueberries.

6.Korean Sweet Pancakes

Drinking watermelon is the key component in this refreshing summer beverage from Korea. This is the drink to serve during an outdoor summer gathering if you’re searching for something refreshing and easy to prepare. To prepare the classic version, start with honey or sugar dissolved in water as the foundation. Alternatively, a soft drink can be substituted for the beer. However, if you add milk to your beverage, it will become slightly heavier. If you want to make the punch even sweeter, feel free to add other fruits such as melon, pineapple, and blueberries.

7.Sweet Rice Cake

Are you looking for a dessert that is both healthy and delicious? Yaksik, that’s what it is! Yaksik, also known as sweet rice cake, is a traditional Turkish dessert prepared with glutinous rice, nuts, dried fruits, and honey. Of course, everything that contains honey is beneficial to your health due to the various health advantages that honey provides. This recipe produces a rice cake that is both sticky and chewy in texture. So you’ll know you’ve done something properly if the rice grains are still intact.

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8.Pepero Cake

Lotte Confectionery manufactures Pepero, a famous South Korean snack that is widely available. An entire box of Pepero contains cookie sticks that have been dipped in chocolate. This snack is so well-known in Korea that they have designated a special day just for it: Pepero Day. It takes place on the 11th of November every year, when individuals exchange Pepero sticks as a symbol of their affection for one another. Making a cake out of these tiny sticks will allow you to express even more affection!

To finish it off, sprinkle on some chopped pistachio nuts for more taste and texture.

9.Sweet Red Bean Porridge

Red beans can be used in a variety of ways. You may use them to make a delicious sweet porridge this time around! When it’s cold outside and you’re craving something sweet and comforting, this is the dish to try. This silky smooth porridge may be made with glutinous rice flour, sugar, and salt, among other ingredients. It’s softly sweetened, but you may adjust the sweetness by adding extra sugar or honey to your liking.

10.Red Bean Popsicles

In this dish, the great red bean is the star, as it has been in the previous ones. It is necessary to puree the beans until they form a paste before blending them once again with the condensed milk for this dessert, though. Popsicle molds with this combination will result in a delicious and creamy red bean popsicle that everyone will enjoy! In order to give this dish a chewy texture, a small cup of whole beans should be mixed into the red bean paste.

11.Korean Honey Pastry

In Korea, this honey pastry, also known as yakgwa, is usually eaten on special occasions such as holidays. Deep-fried cookie drenched in honey syrup, which imparts a moist texture and sweet flavor to the finished product.

Additionally, ginger is incorporated in the honey syrup to enhance the flavor profile. If you want to add a little crunch to your cookies, sprinkle chopped nuts on top of them before baking.

12.Korean Donuts

Donuts, doughnuts, donuts! It is the scent of these twisted-shaped delights that will fill your kitchen with a warm and inviting atmosphere. When you bite into this treat, you can anticipate a deliciously sweet nibble! These gorgeous fried donuts require just a little coating of powdered sugar and, on sometimes, a dash of cinnamon to complete their appearance. It’s best served with a glass of milk since it’s the perfect pairing!

13.Dasik

Donuts, to be precise. The perfume of these twisted-shaped sweets will fill your home with a warm and pleasant scent as they bake. Get ready to enjoy a deliciously sweet snack as you bite into it. Just a sprinkling of powdered sugar and a dash of cinnamon to finish off these gorgeous fried donuts is all that is required. Pour a glass of milk on the side since this is the best pairing!

14.Korean Half-Moon Rice Cakes

During Chuseok, one of Korea’s most important holidays, these rice cakes are a popular treat. A delicate pine tree flavor permeates the mildly sweet and chewy texture of these cookies. While there are many variations on the fillings for these rice cakes, the most typical are sweetened sesame seeds and mung beans. The most enjoyable aspect is decorating the dough. It is possible to color them naturally by using kabocha, mugwort, and dried fruit powders, or you may add your own food coloring alternatives.

15.Korean Red Bean and Mochi Cake

Do you want any more tasty red beans? This mochi cake will completely quench your cravings! This chewy cake has a red bean paste filling and is garnished with roasted chestnuts and walnuts to give it a festive look. What’s the best part? It’s a cinch to put together. Simply combine all of the ingredients in a mixing dish and whisk until smooth. After 45 minutes in the oven, you’re finished!

16.Korean Cinnamon Punch

Korea’s traditional dessert drink, cinnamon punch, is widely eaten on New Year’s Day and Chuseok, as well as other special occasions. I enjoy this punch when it is served ice cold, as opposed to when it is served hot. Simply take it out of the fridge and sip it while the warming scents of cinnamon and ginger linger in your mouth.

17.Sweet Rice Mini Bundt Cakes

Crunchy on the outside and chewy on the inside, these mini-bundt cakes have a texture that is comparable to cornbread in taste and texture. This recipe calls for ordinary ingredients like as butter, egg, milk, and vanilla essence, among other things. Brown and sweet rice are also included in the ingredient list since they contribute to the cake’s pleasing texture. Furthermore, mixing them results in a nutritious dessert that is high in fiber and minerals.

18.Korean Sponge Candy

This unique sponge candy is a popular sweet delicacy in Korea, and it is often offered by street sellers. Using only two ingredients, sugar and baking soda, you can create a lollipop that looks and tastes like toffee. The techniques for preparing this sponge sweets are also rather straightforward. It only takes a few minutes of mixing, heating, and pressing. Bring the kids along for a fun family activity on a weeknight!

19.Red Bean Mochi

Winter in Korea means it’s time to indulge in some delicious red bean mochi! And, yeah, you are correct in your prediction. It’s another another dish in which delicious red beans are used as a paste.

But, to be honest, it doesn’t bother me because it’s such a fantastic pleasure. Cooking the mochi in the microwave will make the process much simpler. If you don’t have the time to prepare your own red bean paste, using store-bought red bean paste is an excellent alternative.

20.Korean Coffee

This dessert drink, also known as dalgona coffee, is a cooled coffee that has been made extra exceptional by the addition of a velvety smooth and sweet froth on top. There are just three ingredients and five minutes of prep time required for this dish, making it the quickest and most straightforward on our list. Of course, if you want to perform the whipping by hand, the process of producing the coffee will take longer. After all, once you get that frothy coffee mixture in your hands, it will all be worthwhile!

21.Walnuts Wrapped in Persimmon

Combined with split walnuts, dried persimmons make a tasty portable snack that goes well with green tea or cinnamon tea. Cooking time depends on how long you want to let the persimmons dry in direct sunshine; however, the rest of the techniques are quick and simple. If you want to get things done faster, you may use a food dehydrator or dried persimmons from the shop.

21 Traditional Korean Desserts

  • Combined with split walnuts, dried persimmons make a convenient portable snack that goes well with green tea or cinnamon tea. Cooking time depends on how long you want to let the persimmons dry in direct sunshine
  • Nevertheless, the rest of the techniques are simple and quick. Using a food dehydrator or dried persimmons from the shop can help you get things done faster.

21 Traditional Korean Desserts and How To Make Them – The Kitchen Community

Desserts aren’t often the first item that comes to mind when thinking about Korean food. A variety of popular street snacks, like as kimchi, hotteok, and kimbap, are among the many specialties of Korean cuisine. Korean sweets, on the other hand, are a little more underappreciated. Take a look at this. Although it’s no secret that Korean cuisine is visually appealing, this is especially true of their exquisite and delicate sweets, which are particularly noteworthy. Their sweets range from sickeningly sweet yet satisfyingly satisfying to pleasantly sour or savory – each has its own history and tale – and each has its own history and story.

Tea Cookies (Dasik) – Kimchimari “> Tea Cookies (Dasik) – Kimchimari

Tea biscuits (also known as Dasik) have been around since the 17th century and are a popular Korean dessert (as well as a light snack between meals) because of their distinct taste and texture. This intriguing snack, which is not exactly like American cookies, is comprised of pleasantly sweet candy that melts in your tongue when you bite into it. Tea cakes were traditionally served in large quantities at banquets and other special events. This is due to the fact that the sweet sweets were served with tea, which was associated with the affluent and upper class.

It’s probable that you’ll encounter them during a Korean wedding or first birthday celebration!

Sweet Rice Dessert (Yaksik) – Jessica’s Dinner Party “> Sweet Rice Dessert (Yaksik) – Jessica’s Dinner Party

The sweet rice dessert cakes that Korean children eat as children are a frequent feature of their childhood. You have to laugh at how food may act as a doorway to the past, don’t you think? There are many other types of rice cakes, but the sweet rice ones are made with (you guessed it) sweet rice and are topped with nuts and dried fruits. A special combination of soy sauce, cinnamon, honey, brown sugar and other ingredients is used to hold the cakes in place while they are being baked.

In Alaska, yaksik is enjoyed throughout the year as a snack or dessert, with the first full moon of the Lunar New Year serving as the traditional day of consumption.

Poached Pears (Baesuk) – My Korean Kitchen “> Poached Pears (Baesuk) – My Korean Kitchen

While baesuk is traditionally used as a delightful cough and cold treatment, it is also a popular dessert choice in Korea. Steamed or poached pears are typically served in a sweet syrup that is relatively thick in consistency. Because the pears lose their inherent taste when exposed to the liquid, most people consume merely the drink itself. This does not detract from the fact that baesuk is a wonderful and soothing delicacy, though.

Sweet Korean Pancakes (Hotteok) – Korean Bapsang “> Sweet Korean Pancakes (Hotteok) – Korean Bapsang

Baesuk is a famous Korean dish that is traditionally used as a pleasant treatment for coughs and colds. Steamed or poached pears are typically served in a sweet syrup that is slightly thick in texture. Because the pears lose their inherent sweetness when exposed to the liquid, it is customary to eat solely the beverage itself. The fact that baesuk is a tasty and soothing dessert does not detract from its appeal.

Shaved Ice (Bingsu) – Kimchimari “> Shaved Ice (Bingsu) – Kimchimari

Shaved ice is one of the most refreshing Korean treats to enjoy throughout the summer months. Patbingsu is the most traditional variety of bingsu, consisting of shaved ice topped with red beans, however there are many more types of shaved ice available nowadays. It’s important to note that the summer months in Korea may be quite warm and oppressive, thus ice cream or sorbet is not typically served as a dessert to cool off. Having a hefty dairy-based dessert is the last thing anyone wants when they may enjoy a bowl of cool shaved ice that also serves to replenish their body!

Makgeolli Ice Cream – K-Food Fan “> Makgeolli Ice Cream – K-Food Fan

The Koreans prepare delicious ice cream to nearly totally offset the shaved ice, which is perfect for serving as a treat any time of the year. In Korea, makgeolli is a rice wine with a peculiar milky look, which is what distinguishes this specific ice cream from the others. Despite the fact that it requires a lot of wrist activity, this recipe does not necessitate the use of an ice cream maker! In addition, the lemon verbena stems impart a delightfully refreshing taste to the icecream.

Honey Pastry (Yakgwa) – Kimchimari “> Honey Pastry (Yakgwa) – Kimchimari

When it comes to dessert, Koreans produce incredible ice cream that can be enjoyed all year round to nearly entirely neutralize the effects of shaved ice. Korean rice wine known as Makgeolli has a peculiar milky look, which is what distinguishes this specific ice cream from the others. Despite the fact that it requires a lot of wrist activity, this recipe does not necessitate the use of an ice cream machine! Adding lemon verbena stems to the icecream imparts a very refreshing taste.

Half-moon Rice Cakes (Songpyeon) – Korean Food “> Half-moon Rice Cakes (Songpyeon) – Korean Food

Korea’s harvest festival, known as Chuseok, is celebrated over three days in the midst of October, making it a huge three-day vacation. Songpyeon is cooked in large quantities during this period to express gratitude to Korean ancestors for the provision of grains and fresh fruit. A variety of colors and shapes may be achieved by shaping the rice cakes into half-moons, and they can all be prepared from natural components such as fruit. These rice cakes are available in both sweet and savory varieties, and they are consumed during the celebrations as part of a range of meals.

Sweet Rice Mini Bundt Cake – Kimchimari “> Sweet Rice Mini Bundt Cake – Kimchimari

It’s interesting to note that the origins of the Korean sweet rice tiny bundt cake are not known. It has been suggested that this dish was made by Koreans who resided in America, but there have been so many modifications that it no longer matters who invented it. These little bundt cakes are reminiscent of cornbread in that they have a soft outer layer and a crunchier center layer.

Some bundt cakes contain nuts, while others contain dried fruit; some have both, while others contain none. Because the sweet rice milled flour is significantly more fiber and nutritious than processed flour, this treat appears to be a healthy option.

Whipped Coffee (Dalgona Coffee) – My Korean Kitchen “> Whipped Coffee (Dalgona Coffee) – My Korean Kitchen

After a dinner, some individuals choose to have a cup of coffee rather than a sweet treat afterward. Recent years have seen the rise of Dalgona Coffee (more generally known as whipped coffee) as a global phenomenon. This coffee, which is made from little more than instant coffee, milk, sugar, and hot water, needs a lot of whisking to get its fluffy, whipped quality. Because of its foamy look, this coffee is sometimes referred to as a “upside-down cappuccino.”

Korean Mochi Rice Cake (Chapssaltteok) – Maangchi “> Korean Mochi Rice Cake (Chapssaltteok) – Maangchi

Môchi (rice cake) is a Japanese delicacy, while chapssaltteok (rice cake pudding) is the Korean counterpart. This treat, which is made of glutinous rice and red bean paste, is well-known for its thick and somewhat chewy consistency. These rice cakes are usually available in three different colors: white, pink, and green. The white rice cakes are uncolored, while the pink rice cakes are colored with red food coloring and the green rice cakes are colored with green tea powder. Most of the time, folks will purchase chapssaltteok in attractive packaging to present as gifts to their neighbors and friends.

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Twisted Donuts (Kkwabaegi) – Maangchi “> Twisted Donuts (Kkwabaegi) – Maangchi

Japanese rice cake delicacy mochi is known as chapssaltteok in Korea, and it’s similar to the Japanese version. This dish, which is made of glutinous rice and red bean paste, is known for its thick and somewhat chewy texture. White, pink, and green rice cakes are the most common hues available for these rice cakes. The white rice cakes are uncolored, while the pink and green rice cakes are colored using red food coloring and green tea powder, respectively. Chassaltteok is typically purchased in attractive packaging to be given as a present to neighbors and other friends.

Sponge Candy (Dalgona) – Kimchimari “> Sponge Candy (Dalgona) – Kimchimari

Do you remember the name from earlier? That’s true – this one-of-a-kind sponge sweets was the inspiration for the name Dalgona coffee. It’s worth noting that the coffee does not taste exactly like the candy; they simply have the same name. There are many different types of sponge candy available across the world, but Korean sponge candy is unusual in that it only requires three ingredients: sugar, baking soda, and vegetable oil. Candy is most known for its numerous form variants, which are extremely popular among children of all ages.

Red Bean Rice Cakes (Bukkumi) – Maangchi “> Red Bean Rice Cakes (Bukkumi) – Maangchi

Bukkumi are little rice cakes that are pan-fried and filled with a delicious red bean filling. Koreans are masters at combining red beans and glutinous rice flour to create a variety of delectable dishes. These specific rice cakes have a crispy outside and a soft and sweet filling on the inside, making them a great snack.

Bukkumi aren’t usually decorated, but when a particular season or event calls for them, they’re typically adorned with seasonal flowers or little fruits to celebrate the occasion. The Chinese fruit jujube is a favorite dessert topping in Korea, where it is served on top of ice cream.

Crunchy Nut Candy (Yeot-gangjeong) – Maangchi “> Crunchy Nut Candy (Yeot-gangjeong) – Maangchi

This classic Korean treat is surprisingly simple to make, especially for a traditional Korean dish! A sticky rice syrup and a variety of nuts are the only ingredients in this sweet. Despite the fact that it may be purchased at Korean grocery shops or street markets, the majority of Koreans will agree that the handmade versions are far superior. The taste is worth it despite the fact that it is a sticky candy that will make your fingers sticky as you eat it.

Cinnamon Punch (Sujeonggwa) – My Korean Kitchen “> Cinnamon Punch (Sujeonggwa) – My Korean Kitchen

This classic Korean delicacy is surprisingly simple to prepare. Only assorted nuts and a sticky rice syrup are used to make this confection. However, most Koreans will agree that the handmade versions are far superior to the ones purchased from grocery shops or street markets. The taste is worth it despite the fact that it is a sticky sweet that will make your fingers sticky when eaten.

Honey Bread – The Sweet Tidings “> Honey Bread – The Sweet Tidings

This dense loaf of bread is filled with whipped cream and then sprinkled with honey, cinnamon powder, and caramel syrup before baking. It is most usually found at restaurants and cafés since it is typically consumed with a beverage. Despite its substantial size, this is a delectable dessert that is frequently devoured in a short period of time. It is advised to have a piece of Honey Bread with a cup of coffee after a dinner, since it is a delicious way to conclude the meal.

Fish-Shaped Pastry (Bungeoppang) – My Korean Kitchen “> Fish-Shaped Pastry (Bungeoppang) – My Korean Kitchen

Bungeoppang is a pastry in the shape of a fish that is generally served in street markets in Korea during the colder months of the year. It’s interesting to note that the pastry originated in Japan rather than Korea. These pastries are a mainstay of every Korean’s childhood diet, and they continue to be a part of their adult diet when they want to reminisce about their youth. The majority of the time, these pastries are filled with a variety of flavors such as red bean paste, peanut butter, Nutella, or custard.

Five Flavor Berry Tea (Omija Tea) – My Korean Kitchen “> Five Flavor Berry Tea (Omija Tea) – My Korean Kitchen

This tea’s name, Omija, means “five taste berries” in Korean, and it is so named because the berries used to produce it have five distinct flavors: sweetness, sourness, saltiness, pungentness, and bitterness. As you may guess, this results in a flavor that is distinct. It is commonly referred to as “Magnolia Berry Tea,” and it is generally used in the summer months to hydrate individuals and keep them cool from the heat. For this tea, the Omija berries are dried and steeped in boiling water for at least an hour before being brewed.

Watermelon Punch (Subak Hwachae) – Korean Bapsang “> Watermelon Punch (Subak Hwachae) – Korean Bapsang

Hwachae is a traditional Korean punch that is available in a range of tastes – around 30 different varieties to be exact. Subak Hwachae is a watermelon punch that is often consumed in Korea during the hot summer months to cool down and hydrate the drinker’s body. Given that it is made with fresh fruits, Hwachae is frequently consumed as a dessert following a large dinner by individuals who do not like to consume a complete dessert!

In addition, the fresh fruit components give this a rather nutritious punch that is considered to strengthen the immune system and help digestion, among other things.

Walnut Cakes (Hodo Kwaja) – Chowhound “> Walnut Cakes (Hodo Kwaja) – Chowhound

HODO KWAJA is a famous Korean street snack that is made out of cake molds in the shape of walnuts and filled with a sweet red bean filling (at this point, always expect a Korean dessert to include some form of red bean filling). To be clear, not every walnut cake has real walnuts in its composition. However, because this is an optional element, it is worth taking into consideration for people who are allergic to nuts. The majority of the time, Koreans will purchase Hodo Kwaja at rest stops in order to raise their blood sugar levels.

dessert

Desserts are not often provided at the end of a Korean meal, as is customary in the country. The sweets in this category are intended to be presented on special occasions, either as a standalone treat or as a complementary accompaniment to tea.

Dalgona with nuts

Dalgona is a slang term for a woman who is a Dalgona.

Sweet pressed cookies

In the case of Dalgona, the word dalgona means “diamond.”

Rice syrup

Ssal-jocheong (Ssal-jocheong) is a Korean word that means “sal-jocheong” (sal-jocheong).

Custard cream bread

Cream-ppang (cream-ppang)

Grilled cheeserice cake skewers

Cheese-tteok-kkochi (Cheese-tteok-kkochi)

Cinnamon rolls

Cinnamon-rollppang (cinnamon-rollppang)

Super-nutritious rice cake

Cilantro-rollppang (cinnamon-rollppang)

Cinnamon cookies filled with bean paste

Gyepi-manju (Gyepi-manju is a kind of manju)

Layered rice cake with red beans

Pat-sirutteok (Pat-sirutteok)

Omija punch with pear

Omija-hwachae (Omija-hwachae) is a Korean word that means “Omija-hwachae” (Omija-hwachae).

Beet jelly candy

Beet-jeonggwa is a Korean word that means “beet-jeonggwa” (beet-jeonggwa).

Fluffy steamed buns filled with sweet red beans

jjinppang jjinppang jjinppang

Sweet, chewy, doughnut balls filled with sweet red beans

Doughnuts that are chapssal in size

Crunchy balloon bread

Gonggal-ppang (Gonggal-ppang) is a Korean word that means “gonggal-ppang” or “gonggal-ppang.”

Crunchy peanut cookies

Matdongsan (Matdongsan) is a Korean word that means “Matdongsan is a person.”

Yuja tea

Yujacha is a Japanese word that means “young woman.”

Twisted doughnuts

Kkwabaegi is an abbreviation for Kkwabaegi.

Squash rice cake

Hobaktteok (sometimes spelled Hobaktteok) is a Korean word that means “Hobaktteok” in English.

Pan-fried rice cakes with sweet red bean filling

Bukkumi is a Japanese word that means “boasting.”

Sweetened rice with dried fruits and nuts

Seoklyu-cha (Seoklyu-cha) is a Korean proverb.

Sesame peanut candy

gangjeong kkae-ttangkong kkae-ttangkong gangjeong kkae-ttangkong gangjeong

Fish-shaped bread with sweet red bean filling

Bungeoppang is a Korean word that means “bungeoppang” (bungeoppang means “bungeoppang” in English).

Chestnut cookies

Yul-lan is the name of a fictional character created by Yul-lan.

Ginseng jujube tea

Insam-daechucha (Insam-Daechucha)

Sugar candy

Yanggaeng is a Korean word that means “yanggaeng” or “yanggaeng.”

Steamed pear

Baekseolgi-tteok (Baekseolgi-tteok)

Ginger tea

Saenggangcha is a Thai word that means “saenggangcha” in English.

Walnuts wrapped in persimmons

Gotgamssam is a slang term for “Gothamssam is a slang term for “Gothamssam is a slang term for “Gothamssam is a slang term for “Gothamssam is a slang term for “Gothamssam is a slang term for “Gothamssam is a slang term for “Gothamssam is a

Korean-style mochi rice cake

Chapssaltteok (Chapssaltteok)

Rice cake

Injeolmi’s full name is Injeolmi.

Baked sweet pastry

For further information, please contact Injeolmi.

Mugwort rice cake

Ssuk-beomul is an abbreviation for Ssuk-beomul.

Crunchy sweet potato fries

ppottetto ppottetto ppottetto

Candied sweet potato

Hotteok is a Korean word that means “hotteok is a hotteok.”

Ginger cookies

Maejakgwa is an abbreviation for Maejakgwa.

Rainbow rice cake

In the language of the Maejakgwa, “Maejakgwa” means “more than” or “greater than.”

Pan-fried sweet rice cakes with edible flowers

Hwajeon (Hwajeon)

Rice punch

Songpyeon (Songpyeon) is a South Korean actor.

Dessert punch with persimmon, cinnamon, and ginger

Sujeonggwa is a Korean word that means “successful.”

Sweet red bean soup

Danpatjuk is an abbreviation for Danpatjuk.

Rice cake

Gyeongdan is the name of a city in South Korea.

12 Popular Korean Desserts (Easy Korean Pastries and Sweets Recipes to Make at Home)

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. Please take the time to read my disclosure policy. Have you ever enjoyed Korean desserts and wished you could learn how to make them yourself? Finally, it’s time to learn how to prepare 12 popular Korean desserts and pastries that are sweet and tasty while still being simple to make!

What Do People Eat for Dessert in Korea?

In Korea, there are a variety of delectable sweets that people enjoy after dinner or as a light snack. Shaved ice with fruit, Yakgwa, Korean Sweet Rice Cakes, and Hotteok are some of the most popular desserts in Korea. In general, components such as red bean paste and rice flour are frequently found in Korean sweets.

Best Korean Desserts

This Korean sweet rice cake is soft and chewy, with a delightful nutty taste that complements the sweet rice cake. It takes no time at all to prepare this vegan and gluten-free dessert at home!

2.Fruits Shaved Ice Milk

In Japan, fruits shaved ice milk (also known as Patbingsu) is the ultimate summer treat. It’s made with frozen milk, sweetened condensed milk, and your favorite fresh fruits. If you’re looking for something a little sweeter, sprinkle some chocolate syrup over the top before serving!

3.Korean Fresh Cream Cake

Are you looking for a delicious dessert that isn’t overly sweet? Then you should definitely try this Korean fresh cream cake. This delicious delicacy is similar to a chiffon cake, with layers of light icing, citrus tastes, and fresh fruit on top!

4.Baked Yakgwa (Korean Honey Cookies)

Is it possible to make a simple Korean dessert that is also delicious? Yakgwa is the name of this creature. You will love how sweet and soft they are, as well as how wet they are! Furthermore, this no-fuss dish is ideal for serving to a crowd.

5.Korean Sweet Pancakes (Hotteok)

It’s a typical breakfast that has been improved! The filling for these Korean sweet pancakes, which is comprised of syrup, brown sugar, and cinnamon, keeps them moist and tasty. You may also offer them for dinner and snacks in addition to breakfast.

6.Korean Sticky Rice Balls with Dried Fruits and Nuts

Using dried fruits and nuts, these Korean sticky rice balls are a tasty delicacy with a delightful texture. This gluten-free dish is well worth the wait because it is well worth it. Healthy, and it’s very simple to prepare!

7.Korean Shaved Ice Dessert (Patbingsu)

Using dried fruits and nuts, these Korean sticky rice balls are a savory treat with a pleasant texture. This gluten-free dish is definitely worth the wait since it is so delicious. It’s also quite simple to prepare.

8.Korean Walnut Pastry (Hodugwaja)

These Korean sweets, which are often served as street food in Korea, are extremely addicting. This spherical pastry is served warm and fresh, and it has a walnut within! At home or on the road, this bite-size snack is ideal!

9.Korean Sponge Candy (Dalgona)

Dalgona is a Korean sponge candy that is similar to a toffee candy, but it is exceedingly sweet and delicious!

Sugar, baking soda, and vegetable oil are used in the preparation of this dish. The best thing is that you can use your imagination to turn them into fascinating patterns!

10.Dalgona Matcha Drink

Dalgona matcha is a unique dessert option that is worth experimenting with. Beautifully sweet and fluffy, with a smooth taste, this drink is a must-have! It just takes 4 ingredients and 5 minutes to create, and it is topped with whipped green tea matcha!

11.Korean Donuts (Cinnamon Sugar Twists)

In case you’re a doughnut connoisseur, this Korean donut recipe is one you must try! Soft on the inside, and delightfully crunchy on the surface, these sweet twists are a treat to eat. It just takes 10 minutes of cooking time to prepare this dish at home!

12.Chapssaltteok Red Bean Mochi (Korean Style)

We saved the best for last with our Chapsaltteok red bean mochi in the traditional Korean way. These rice flour cookies are soft and sweet, and they are guaranteed to satisfy any sweet tooth need! Combine with a cup of coffee or tea for the ideal snack! You may also be interested in

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  • In a medium saucepan, combine the sugar and water. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring constantly, until the sugar is fully dissolved
  • Cover with a cover and reduce the heat to low for 3-4 minutes, or until the syrup has thickened. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the egg whites until they are somewhat foamy, using a hand mixer. Continue to whisk the mixture while adding the heated simple syrup until soft peaks are formed. Pour the green tea matcha powder into the mixing bowl by sieving it in. Continue to beat until all of the ingredients are mixed
  • Pour the milk into the glass after adding the ice cubes. Then finish with a dollop of whipped Matcha. Stir it up and enjoy it

Course:Dessert Korean Desserts are the focus of this article. Follow us on Pinterest @izzycooking or tag us in a picture there.

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