What Dessert Is Similar To Pie

Pie-Like Desserts That Don’t Require Making the Perfect Crust

While there’s nothing quite like a freshly baked pie crust, sometimes investing the necessary time to preparation is simply not an option. Take advantage of the deliciousness of pie-like filling without having to deal with the trouble of assembling a flawless crust with these tasty, sharing delicacies. Fresh cherries are mixed in sugar in this recipe for quick cherry cobbler, which is cooked till golden brown and topped with a simple cornmeal biscuit topping. Recipe may be found here. Articles that are related 5 Plant-Based Substitutes for the Carbohydrates You Despise 13 Simple Substitutions for Unhealthier Ingredients in Your Cooking Easy Low-Sugar Breakfast Recipes to Get Your Day Started on the Right Foot Ina Garten’s Baked Rigatoni with Lamb Ragù is just what we’ve been craving lately.

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This visually appealing and delectable dessert is a favorite in our household. Because it is made using handy pie filling, it can be prepared in a short amount of time—and it only takes a few minutes to cook in the microwave. — Laurie Todd of Columbus, Mississippi, sent in this photo. 2/35

Blueberry Lemon Trifle

This visually appealing and delectable dessert is a favorite in our house. You can make it in minutes since it is made with handy pie filling, and it only takes a few minutes to cook in the microwave once it has been prepared. — The writer Laurie Todd lives in the city of Columbus in Mississippi. 2/35

Cherry Chewbilees

This is a delicious dish to bring to potlucks and gatherings as well. It’s also a smash at my house; my husband considers it to be one of his favorite sweets. Crossett, Arkansas resident Debbie Smith shared her thoughts. 4/35

Lemon Angel Cake Bars

This recipe was given to me by a neighbor many years ago, and it has been in my taste rotation ever since. It may be prepared ahead of time and feeds a large number of people, making it ideal for parties and potlucks. California’s Marina Castle is located in Canyon Country. 5/35

Apple-Pecan Gingerbread Cobbler

Since receiving this recipe from a neighbor years ago, it has become a staple in my taste rotation. It’s easy to prepare ahead of time and feeds a large number of people, making it ideal for potlucks and gatherings with friends. California’s Marina Castle is a must-see destination. 5/35

Cherry Dew Dumplings

That this recipe calls for both filled crescent dough and Mountain Dew to be cooked together is something I’ve never seen before. It’s truly a pleasure. I have to admit that we do have it for breakfast on occasion. —Heidi Swope, Toledo, Ohio 7/35

CakeBerry Campfire Cobbler

One of our favorite ways to wind down after a long day of fishing, hiking, swimming, or rafting is with this warm Dutch oven cobbler.

It’s delicious served with ice cream—and it’s really simple to make! Boise, Idaho resident June Dress 8/35

Coconut-Cherry Cream Squares

These cherry-topped delicacies will leave you speechless. The luscious coconut-custard filling and thin golden crust of this square will satisfy your sweet taste in just one serving. — Food Network Taste of Home Test Kitchen9/35

Black Forest Dump Cake

These cherry-topped delicacies will leave a lasting impression! The delightful coconut-custard interior and thin golden crust of this square will satisfy your sweet taste in one bite. Yummy! — Food Network’s Test Kitchen9 out of 35

Cheesecake Strawberry Trifle

However, the only downside to this delicious delicacy is that there are never any leftovers. Replace one of the layers of strawberry pie filling with blueberry pie filling for a patriotic flair, or use whatever filling you choose for a more traditional look. • Lori Thorp from Frazee, Minnesota 11/35

Puffed Apple Pastries

Make a crispy “nest” out of store-bought puff pastry to use as a container for delicious apples. Dessert is complete when you add a dash of cinnamon and other spices. Serve with ice cream to add a little additional luxury to your meal. The Taste of Home Test Kitchen 12/35 —

Peaches ‘n’ Cream Bars

This delicious twist on peach pie will have you craving it again and again. There is a strong presence of the soft fruit flavor. The writer, Hubert Scott, of Cockeysville, Maryland 13/35

Cherry Cream Cheese Dessert

These cream cheese sweets are distinguished by their attractive layers of graham cracker crumbs, delicious filling, and fruit topping. Instead of the pie filling specified in the recipe, you may use blueberry pie filling or another fruit flavor to make a wonderful variation on the theme. Ms. Mellinger, from Myerstown, Pennsylvania 14/35

Black Forest Chocolate Torte

If you’re thinking of going above and beyond to create a dessert that will impress your guests, look no further. It’s impossible not to be impressed by this cherry-crowned beauty, which is composed of layered layers of chocolate cake with cream filling. Doris Grotz of York, Nebraska, sent in this message. 15/35

Cherry-Peach Dumplings

Even while you can create this delicious dessert on your stovetop, simmering it in an electric skillet right at the dinner table will certainly dazzle your visitors. There isn’t a more simple method to take advantage of the seasonal bounty. •Patricia Frerk from Syracuse, New York. 16/35

Pumpkin Dessert

These three-layer pumpkin squares are a favorite of ours throughout the fall season, and they make our kitchen smell great while baking. They are seldom around for very long! Ruth Chiarenza of La Vale, Maryland, sent this in. 17/35

Chocolate Cherry Layer Cake

This decadent cake is quite adaptable and may be enjoyed throughout the year. To celebrate Valentine’s Day, I’ve altered the design on the top to a heart, a pumpkin to celebrate fall, and a tree to celebrate Christmas. —Flo Burtnett, Gage, Oklahoma Flo Burtnett 18/35

Cherry Bars

Simple pantry items and cherry pie filling allow you to whip up a pan of these festive treats in about 20 minutes. Because of the simplicity of preparation and the attractive colors, they are bound to become a Christmas classic. The author, Jane Kamp of Grand Rapids, Michigan 19/35

Crunchy Amaretto Peach Cobbler

Then this is the meal for you if you’re certain you want to cook a dessert that will be so comforting and delicious that your guests will not want to leave. The author, Debra Keil, of Owasso, Oklahoma 20/35

Cherries on a Cloud

When we visit our Amish friend Naomi Yoder, she makes this meringue heart with cream cheese and pie filling, which we enjoy every time. On our wagon train holiday, we’ll be stopping at her family’s farm. Judy Herbkersman of Collins, Ohio, sent in this photo. 21/35

Apple and Squash Crisp

This crisp was delivered to a parish supper at my church by a kind soul. I inquired about the recipe, and now I bring this delectable dessert to every potluck that I participate in. It is 22/35 in Ijamsville, Maryland, according to Therese Butler.

Black Forest Sandwich Cookies

By utilizing chocolate wafers from the cookie aisle, you may reduce the amount of time spent preparing these sandwich cookies. When planning a party, you may even create them ahead of time to save yourself a few minutes on the day of the event. — Cooking with a Taste of Home Test Kitchen23/35

Cherry Crumb Dessert

It is extremely delicious when topped with whipped cream or ice cream, as shown in the picture above. None of your guests will suspect that this delicious streusel was made with a box of cake mix as the starting point for its creation. — Ann Eastman of Greenville, California, is a writer. 24/35

Lemon Custard Cake

This custard cake recipe was passed down to me by my grandmother and is perfect for when unexpected guests come to visit. It’s a refreshing, creamy treat that tastes like you put effort into it. Sue Gronholz, of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, sent the following response: 25/35

Blueberry Angel Dessert

Utilize angel food cake, pie filling, and whipped topping to create a light and attractive dessert that will not require you to spend a lot of time in the kitchen. It’s the ideal way to cap off a summer dinner. Tyler, Texas26/35 —Carol Johnson

Cherry Dream Cake

This cherry cake is one of my favorite holiday desserts since it is both festive and simple to make. No one will ever guess that you used a container of cherry gelatin to make a boxed cake mix from scratch! Ms. Margaret McNeil from Germantown, Tennessee 27/35

Lemon Meringue Cupcakes

These charming miniature cupcakes were inspired by the classic lemon meringue pie. A lemon pie filling is hidden within the tart delicacies, which are topped with a fluffy meringue that has been toasted to perfection. Prepare them in advance of your next special gathering. Andrea Quiroz from Chicago, Illinois, contributed to this article. 28/35

Cherry Gelatin Supreme

When I was growing up, this delicious, uncomplicated dessert was often on the menu at family gatherings and other special occasions. My aunt gave me the recipe many years ago, and every time I prepare it for my family, I think of her and her generosity. Brighton, Illinois resident, Janice Rathgeb 29/35

Cherry-Chocolate Pudgy Pie

This ooey-gooey delicacy is perfect for campfires and cookouts since it is easy to make. —Josh Carter from Birmingham, Alabama (USA). 30/35

Apricot-Raspberry Angel Torte

The fact that you used a premade angel food cake and canned pie filling to produce this stunning torte will be completely unknown to your guests. The addition of fresh raspberries gives the dish a home-cooked appearance. —Sally Sibthorpe of Shelby Township, Michigan31/35

Minister’s Delight

This recipe was given to me by a friend some years ago.

She claimed it was made every Sunday by the wife of a local pastor, and so she called it after her — Mary Ann Potter, of Blue Springs, Missouri, is a writer. 32/35

Red, White ‘n’ Blue Torte

When I transform a frozen pound cake into a patriotic treat, my visitors think they’re seeing fireworks! Put together this tantalizing torte early in the day and store it in the refrigerator until it’s time to serve it for dessert. —Margery Bryan, Moses Lake, Washington33/35 minutes

Daughter’s Apple Crisp

My mother’s apple crisp is, without a doubt, the greatest in all of Texas. After a small adjustment, I now spend less time in the kitchen and more time catching up with my vibrant 92-year-old mother, who is still as active as ever. North Richland Hills, Texas resident Joan Hallford 34/35

Italian Pineapple Trifle

Every year for our family’s Christmas Eve festivities, my grandma baked this creamy, delectable trifle from scratch. Now I’m making it in order to continue her personal ritual. It’s a simple, tasty no-bake dessert that the whole family will enjoy. —Ann-Marie Milano, of Milton, Massachusetts, United States 35/35

Cinnamon Cherry Cobbler

It’s not a typo: there are just two ingredients in this spicy cherry dessert, and they’re both delicious. It’s also an excellent brunch option for those who enjoy sweets. — Terri Robinson of Muncie, Indiana, submitted this entry. The original publication date was February 26, 2018.

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9 Desserts Better Than Apple Pie

The satisfaction of investing your blood, sweat, and tears into crafting a gorgeous apple pie with its contents leaking ever-so-slightly through the latticed crust will never fade. It is a tradition. However, there is much to be said for branching out and taking a less-than-traditional (and frequently simpler) path. These dishes, which range from baked to fried to smoothied, are as as excellent as, if not better than, their crusted counterparts in terms of taste. Let’s get this party started.

  1. However, when it comes to delectable treats, you could do a lot worse.
  2. Discover how to create them.
  3. When it comes to dessert, apples are the ideal edible vessel — at the very least.
  4. In order to reduce your sugar intake, you can omit the whipped cream and caramel sauce from the recipe.
  5. You can find the recipe here.
  6. But we’re confident that no one will be able to resist these simple no-bake treats.
  7. Here’s where you can get the recipe for your meal prep.

Brown sugar and apple cider are used in the preparation of these dumplings, which are some of my favorite fall flavors.

Learn how to manufacture them by following the procedures outlined here.

These quinoabites are delicious at any time of day, and because they include a significant amount of protein, they will keep you fuller for a longer period of time than a bag of potato chips would.

Get to work on it right away.

This smoothie is creamy, sweet, and gluten-free, and it checks all of the boxes.

You can find the recipe here.

It would be good to click through simply to see the photographs of gooey, cinnamony apples topped with a nicely latticed crust in this recipe.

Take a look at the recipe.

A dish of apple pie filling is all it is, and it couldn’t be much easier to prepare.

It’s time to get cooking.

Using handmade dough or puff pastry rather than store-bought dough will improve the taste and make them a bit less processed, which will make them even better!

When it comes to sweets, apple pie is among the most epic of all tart-like desserts, and it will always find itself on holiday tables.

However, there are times when you want to take an apple in a different path with a little less effort, a few more nutrients, or perhaps fewer calories in mind. We recommend adding a dash of. spice to your meal.

The Difference Between Pies and Tarts

Is it as simple as pie? Learn the differences between Pies, Crumbles, Cobblers, Tarts, and more desserts here! There are a variety of excellent desserts to serve your guests after dinner, ranging from pies to galettes. But what distinguishes them from one another? We’ve broken it all down for you to understand! The classic dish of pie is made using a basic and straightforward equation: bottom pie crust + filling + top pie crust = delectable pie. While the top pie crust is optional, when it is utilized, it is squeezed together with the bottom pie crust to form a seal between them.

  1. The primary distinction between tarts and pie crusts is that tarts only have a bottom crust, and that crust is significantly thicker than a pie crust.
  2. Galettes are essentially a pie that is not baked in a pie dish.
  3. To create a rustic-looking pie crust, fold the sides up and just slightly on top of the filling, overlapping them slightly.
  4. Crumbles– If you’re searching for a quick and easy alternative to pie, a crumble is a good choice.
  5. Crumbles are also topped with a streusel-like mixture.
  6. An oat, flour, sugar, and butter combination is used to top a crisp, rather than the crumbles used to top a crumble streusel topping.
  7. This dish is cooked until the topping is crisp, just like its name suggests it should be.
  8. As an alternative, the fruit filling is baked in a baking dish and covered with biscuit dough to produce a top crust before being served.
  9. When you create one, you’ll understand how this dish came to be known as such.
  10. Now that we’ve sorted that out, we’re going to muddle the waters even further with our hybrid dessert for Caramel Apple Crumble Pie.
  11. You make the call!
See also:  What Dessert Can I Make With Cherry Pie Filling

14 Mouth-Watering Desserts From the Southern States

The South is renowned for its delicious sweets, which are bursting with flavor. While many of the sweets are variants of recipes that date back to the early settlers, Southerners have infused their own unique flavor into the desserts. There is something for every sweet taste on this list of wonderful desserts from the Southern states, which includes everything from silky cakes to creamy puddings to acidic pies and more. Strawberry Banana Pudding|Stu spivack/Flickr Banana pudding has been a popular dessert associated with the South since the mid-1900s, despite the fact that it is not a traditional Southern delicacy.

  • In addition to sliced bananas and cookies, the custard is topped with either freshly whipped cream or meringue, depending on the recipe.
  • Bread pudding|Photo courtesy of Phil Denton/Flickr With a history that dates back to the 11th century, when cooks were looking for ways to use up stale bread, this dish is famous around the world, including the southern states of the United States.
  • A warm, fragrant sauce is then spooned over the warm pudding, producing a soothing dessert.
  • Lemon Chess Pie|Photo courtesy of Stacy Spensley/Flickr There are many different legends regarding chess pie, but there is no agreed-upon background for this extremely rich Southern delicacy that is popular today.
  • A custard-based pie with a caramelized top that is created with simple, common components such as butter, sugar, eggs, flour or cornmeal, with the addition of buttermilk, vinegar, or lemon to balance out the sweetness, according to bakers.
  • The South is renowned for its intricate, multi-layer cakes, each of which has a different sort of delectable filling between each layer of cake.
  • The recipe for the hummingbird cake was provided by Mrs.

Wiggins of Greensboro, North Carolina, and was originally published in Southern Livingmagazine in 1978.

This wonderful, moist delicacy is a delightful Southern treat created with ripe bananas, pineapple, and pecans, and it is topped with a creamy cream cheese frosting for a sweet finishing touch.

Key Lime Pie|Photo courtesy of Ralph Daily/Flickr Key lime pie is a classic dessert with its origins in Key West, Florida, and is a perfect choice for anybody seeking for something sour to satisfy their sweet tooth.

One thing is certain: the mix of key lime juice, eggs, and condensed milk in this light yellow pie, which is baked in a pastry or graham cracker crust, is very wonderful.

This delicious dessert, which is also referenced in To Kill a Mockingbird, is made out of numerous white sponge cakes that are stacked with a filling made of egg yolks, sugar, butter, raisins, and bourbon or brandy, and then coated with icing.

The use of the phrase ‘icebox’ in a recipe almost often indicates that it will be a refreshing summer dessert that requires little to no baking.

This pie, like the key lime pie, has a tart lemon filling prepared with lemon juice and additional ingredients such as condensed milk, cream cheese, and egg yolks, but the exact components vary from recipe to recipe.

Peach cobbler served with vanilla ice cream|Photo courtesy of Ralph Daily/Flickr.

The peach cobbler, which is derived from recipes from early settlers, is a deep-dish sweet delight brimming with fruit and covered with some form of crust, with the most popular being a biscuit topping.

Pecan Pie|Photo courtesy of cyclonebill/Flickr Despite the fact that pecan pie is a staple Southern dessert, the origins of the dish is hazy at best.

No matter which way you slice it, this sweet and nutty combination of nuts, corn syrup, and sugar baked in a delectable buttery crust will please anybody with a serious sweet tooth.

The pound cake is a highly rich, thick, buttery delicacy that goes back to the 1700s.

The dessert, which is of British origin, is a popular choice around the world, but is particularly popular in the southern United States.

Pound cakes, which are typically prepared in a loaf or bundt pan, are occasionally sprinkled with powdered sugar or topped with a thin glaze before serving.

There is substantial debate over the origins of this cake, with some claiming that it originated in New YorkCity and others claiming that it was made during the American Civil War.

Sweet potato pie|Photo courtesy of Katie/Flickr Sweet potato pie has a long and illustrious history, with the oldest recorded recipe being published by Abby Fisher, a former slave.

Sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon, and milk are added to cooked, mashed sweet potatoes to form a velvety smooth concoction that is then placed into a pie shell and baked until it is golden and crisp.

A rich custard filling produced with readily available ingredients, such as eggs, milk, sugar, and vanilla extract, is poured into a sweet dough shell and baked until it is set, beginning with a sweet dough foundation.

A lattice is used to decorate the top of certain tarts, while others do not. Tarte à la Bouillie is frequently topped with fruit, like as blackberries, and served warm.

Easy Apple Pie Bites – A Quick & Easy Alternative to Apple Pie

Tuesday Suggestions! Easy Apple Pie Bites made with only four ingredients are what I’d like to share with you today. I did not come up with the idea for this dish; instead, I came across it here a few years ago. Due to the overwhelming popularity of the little mummy dogs, I decided to create my own version of them to share with you in case you haven’t already seen them. I understand how vital it is to have dishes that are quick and easy to prepare, especially around the holidays.

Why I Love these Easy Apple Pie Bites

  1. They are really simple and quick to make – there is no rolling out or wrangling with pie crust required. Kid-Friendly — A slice of pie might be scary for a young child, but these simple apple pie bits are exactly the ideal size for them. Making this recipe is enjoyable for children. Simple preparation makes for simple entertaining — no cutting or cutlery required
  2. A smaller bite than a slice of pie – which is perfect if you want to taste a range of desserts or if you want to keep your sugar intake under control. I used only a small amount of sugar.

Simply slice your apple and arrange your ingredients on a baking sheet. Toss the apple slices with 2 teaspoons sugar and 1/2 teaspoon apple pie spice, and set aside to cool. Fold the thick section of each dough piece in half and roll it up. Repeat with the remaining dough pieces. Place the cookies on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, sprinkle with raw sugar (optional), and bake for 15 minutes. In all, 8 bits may be made from a single apple and one dough box (I chose Immaculate Baking because I prefer basic ingredients).

They are less complicated to prepare, serve, and consume!

Other Short-cuts or Alternatives

  • They contain basic, real ingredients (nearly the same as my pie crust), and I really like the frozen pie crusts from Whole Foods Market. Alternatively, if you have trouble with pie crusts, try an apple galette, which is more forgiving and intended to look rustic. MyEasy Apple Cake is a delicious and nutritious option. It is really quicker to cut out amusing shapes and build a beautiful top than it is to put on a solid top crust and seal it with a pastry sealer and crimp it
  • Prepare a baking sheet by lining it with parchment paper and preheating the oven to 350 degrees. Apple should be washed and sliced into 16 wedges (I used an apple splitter for this). Toss the apples in a bowl with the sugar and apple pie spice. Prepare your crescent dough by spreading it out on a baking sheet. 2 apples should be placed on the thick side of the crescent dough and rolled up Place each bite on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Carry on making more nibbles until all of the dough has been consumed. A pinch of raw sugar (optional) can be sprinkled on top of each mouthful. Preheat the oven to 350°F and bake for 15 minutes, or until the dough is puffy and gently colored.
  1. I choose not to peel the apples for this recipe since the skins retain all of the nutritious value, and I like to leave them on when cooking. If you want your apples peeled, you can do so for this recipe
  2. Otherwise, leave them whole. You may also chop the apple into 8 pieces and place one piece in each mouthful, but the apple may not cook as much as you would want. I cut the apples into 16 slices and served them with 2 pieces each mouthful so that they would cook more thoroughly.

I would love to see what you have come up with! Take a photo and tag it with @FoodPlayGoor foodplaygoon on social media.

Desserts That Start With E

Most people are aware with some of the most popular desserts, like cookies, pies, and ice cream. I’m sure you’ve tried them all. What about sweets that begin with the letter E, on the other hand? Desserts such as eclairs, elephant ears, and Eskimo pie should not be overlooked! As a result, in this post, we pay tribute to the desserts that begin with the letter E. Would you want to bookmark this blog post? Enter your your address here, and we’ll send you the article right to your inbox! Here is a list of all the yummy foods that begin with the letter E in the alphabet.

1. Eclairs

An eclair is similar to a high-end doughnut. By pipeing the dough, it is possible to create this wonderful choux pastry tube. It is then cooked, filled with cream, and iced with chocolate frosting to finish it off. A fascinating tidbit about the word eclair: it literally translates as “flash of lightning” in French, implying that this pastry is so delicious that it will be devoured in a hurry!

2. Eskimo Pie

The Eskimo Pie is a chocolate-covered vanilla ice cream bar with a chocolate covering on top. Christian Kent Nelson, a Danish immigrant, was the one who came up with the idea. He came up with the concept after a young customer walked into his candy store and couldn’t decide between buying ice cream or a chocolate bar. So why not enjoy the best of both worlds? Following that, Christian Kent began experimenting with various combinations of the two. The most difficult element, of course, was getting the chocolate to cling to the bricks of ice cream in the first place.

When the chocolate comes into contact with the cold ice cream, a thin film of chocolate forms on the ice cream’s surface.

The chocolate cools fast, allowing it to harden and produce a firm chocolate coating around the ice cream as it cools and solidifies. Viola. By 1922, he was averaging one million pies a day in revenue!

3. Eggnog

Eggnog is a seasonal dessert prepared with milk, cream, sugar, eggs, and a small amount of alcohol that is especially delicious around the holidays. It’s often created using brandy, rum, or whiskey as the base spirit. Of course, non-alcoholic alternatives may be obtained if you have children who would want to participate in the celebrations as well. You can always spike it afterwards if you want to. It’s also wonderful with a pinch of cinnamon, nutmeg, or vanilla added to the mix. Would you want to bookmark this blog post?

The tradition of drinking egg nog dates back to the 1800s.

However, it was not as sweet and frequently contained far more alcohol than the modern version.

4. Eccles Cake

Eccles cake originates in England, and we Americans are well aware that we have different names for things than our British counterparts. An eccles cake, in our opinion, is much more like a pie or a hand pie than a cake. It’s a buttery, flaky pastry that’s packed with currants, which are little fruits that are similar to grapes but tarter in flavor.

5. Egg Custard

Egg custard is a simple pudding-type delicacy that originates in the Southern United States and is served chilled. It’s created with eggs, of course, but also with milk, butter, sugar, flour, vanilla, and nutmeg, among other ingredients. As opposed to a pudding, it is baked, comparable to a flan or crème brûlée, and is hence more substantial.

6. Eggnog Trifle

Milk, cream, sugar, and beaten eggs are used to make eggnog, which is a traditional Christmas beverage. It may be spiced up with seasonal tastes like nutmeg or spiked with a little wine to make it more interesting. Furthermore, it may be utilized in other enjoyable ways outside drinking, like as in sweets. A trifle is made out of layers of creamy pudding or cake, as well as additional contents such as fruits and whipped cream. Because of this, eggnog should be included in some of the layers of your trifle to create a festive holiday treat!

7. Egg Roll Cookies

Consider the egg rolls you receive at your favorite Chinese restaurant: they’re delicious. Then you can swap out the contents for dessert tastes and you’ve got yourself an egg roll cookie! It is fashioned and filled in the same way as egg rolls, with the exception that the contents are items like chocolate chip cookie dough rather than meat and vegetables. To my ears, this sounds really decent.

8. Elephant Ears

If you’ve ever gone to a county fair, there’s a good chance you’ve had this dish, or at the very least smelled it. They are extra-large pieces of fried dough that are frequently coated with cinnamon sugar or covered with jam, and they are meant to resemble a real elephant’s ear in shape and appearance. I’m confident that they taste significantly better!

9. Empanadas

Empanadas are turnovers that can be baked or fried. They can be savory or sweet, and this list is primarily comprised of sweets to satisfy your sweet tooth.

The name literally translates as ‘enbreaded’ or ‘wrapped in bread!’ They are similar to eccles cakes in that they are a type of hand pie. Fill your pastry with bananas or mangoes if you want to stay true to the genuine Mexican flavors of the region.

10. English Pudding

An English pudding is distinct from a pudding made in the United States, just as the eccles cake is. It’s also not a Snack Pack, by any means. With the filling, it’s more like a cake or a pastry than a sandwich. In addition, they might be sweet or savory; you may have tried a Yorkshire Pudding, which is a savory dish. Their tops are a little like a souffle, with rising pastry-like peaks and contents underneath them. In the United Kingdom, these pies are filled with unusual ingredients such as treacle or dried fruit.

See also:  What Is The Best Way To Keep Dessert Of Apple Pie

10+ Pies That Taste Like Familiar Dessert Favorites

Chelsea Lupkin is a model and actress. Cannoli Pie by Chelsea Lupkin, 1 of 12 For the most ardent cannoli devotees. Get the recipe from the websiteDelish. 2nd of 12Shoofly Pie at Park Feierbach No need to use a cookie cutter for this gingerbread-inspired dessert. Get the recipe from the websiteDelish. The recipe is available at Sally’s Baking Addiction.” “S’mores Pie” is the title of this recipe. src=” Baking Addiction3of 12S’mores Pie” alt=” Baking Addiction3of 12S’mores Pie The ooey-gooey toasted marshmallows, brownie filling, and graham cracker shell will be a hit with the youngsters at the holiday dinner table this year.

  • You may find the recipe at Sally’s Baking Addiction.
  • title=”Banana Pudding Pie” data-src=” src=” Gal Cooks4of 12Banana Pudding Pie” data-src=” src=” Gal Cooks4of 12Banana Pudding Pie Fans of banana pudding will be unable to get enough of this rich and creamy pie.
  • “Deliciously Yum” has the recipe you need.
  • 6 of 12) Not only is this minty ice cream pie delectable, but it just requires three ingredients and will not take up valuable oven real estate.
  • Take a look at “Something Swanky” for the recipe.
  • You can find the recipe at Something Swanky.
  • The title=”Butter Pecan Ice Cream Pie” data-src=” src=” Chicken & Waffles” 8 out of 12 Pie with Butter Pecan Ice Cream “Bakerita” has provided the recipe.
  • the Heat10of 12″ data-src=”src=” the Heat10of 12″ title=”Caramel Apple Streusel Pie” Pie with Caramel Apple Streusel Crust Despite the fact that apple pie is a Thanksgiving staple, this pie is more like a caramel apple with streusel on top.
  • “Cookies and Cups” is the source for the recipe.
  • 11 of 12) We’re betting that utilizing Rice Krispie treats as a pie crust will quickly become a Thanksgiving holiday tradition.
  • Gimme Some Oven has the recipe, which you can get here.

Below This material was generated and maintained by a third party and imported onto this website in order to assist users in providing their email addresses for further consideration. You may be able to discover further information on this and other related items at the website piano.io.

Types of Pie: 8 Pies You Should Know

In addition, there is a pie chart that has nothing to do with mathematics. The difference between a cream pie and a custard pie is as follows: What distinguishes a galette from other baked goods? It’s important to be knowledgeable with the many sorts of pies if you want to become an expert at making them. To make your pie recipe collection complete, choose your favorite category or create pies from each group to see which you prefer. Sour Cherry-Hazelnut Pie (double-crust fruit pie), Chocolate Cream Pie (cream pie), and Lavender Creme Brulee Pie (cream pie) are shown from left to right (custard pie).

1. Double-Crust Fruit Pie

In the summer and fall, these are the pies that you prepare after visiting the orchard. Stacks of delicately stewed fruit are encased in a buttery, flaky top and bottom crust in these classic American pies that are sure to please. For this reason, a thickener like as ground tapioca or cornstarch is frequently added to the filling to prevent it from becoming too soupy when the top crust is removed. Traditionally, the most conventional crusts have cut vents for moisture to escape; however, some fruit fillings, such as cherry and peach, require more evaporation and are commonly paired with lattice-woven crusts to achieve this.

Fruit pies need a full 4 hours to firm up, so don’t cut them into slices too soon after baking.

2. Cream Pie

Pâtisserie cream pies are filled with pastry cream, which is a cold, creamy custard that’s been thoroughly cooked on the stovetop and then put into a totally baked pie crust before being placed in the refrigerator to chill. Whipping cream is typically used to decorate the top of these diner-style pies.

3. Custard Pie

Custard pies feature an egg-thickened filling that’s a bit firmer than pastry cream. A mixture of eggs, dairy, and sugar bakes until set within a single crust. Once cooled, the custard is a creamy, lightly eggy filling that coheres with the crust. A custard pie is done when the center still wobbles gently (165 degrees is typically the sweet spot for doneness) (165 degrees is typically the sweet spot for doneness). Overcooked custard pies can have rubbery, grainy fillings. Sometimes we cook the custard in a saucepan before adding it to the pie to give it a head start; this ensures it bakes quickly so the edges of the custard don’t overcook before the center sets.

From left: Chocolate Angel Pie (meringue pie), Plum and Raspberry Fruit Tart (tart), and Strawberry Galette with Candied Basil and Balsamic (galette) (galette).

4. Meringue Pie

The filling of these pies is adorned with a high plume of whipped egg whites that floats above it like a fluffy, sweet cloud. It is commonly used to top a custard- or curd-filled pie, and it is made by whipping egg whites in a stand mixer and baking them shortly on top of the pie to brown them (but we also whipped up elderflower-flavored meringue for a pie filled with Cape gooseberries in a recipe forThe Perfect Pie).

It is important to whip the meringue until it is just firm peaks to ensure that it does not leak, and anchoring the meringue to the edge of the crust prevents it from slipping away from the edges during the broiling process.

5. Tart

Tarts are a sophisticated subclass of the pie. In contrast to a pie crust, the pastry is sweet and has a closed crumb, suggestive of shortbread. It is often baked in a short-sided fluted pan. Fresh Fruit Tart is an example of a tart with a creamy and rich filling that can be cooked along with the tart shell, as in a Lemon Tart; added after baking, as in a Fresh Fruit Tart; and occasionally topped with fresh fruit, as in a French Apple Tart.

6. Galette

While technically a tart (it’s open-faced), this pastry is more like a pie in that it has a flaky crust and is generally filled with a fruit filling that cooks while the tart is baking. Made on a baking sheet in a free-form fashion (which is why the terms free-form tart and galette are used interchangeably), it’s quick and easy to put together. Because the center is open, the fruit in these tarts effectively roasts, and their juices generally thicken without the use of a thickening. This is because the middle is open.

7. Chiffon Pie

A chiffon pie has an air of antiquity about it. Its filling is considerably lighter in texture than cream or custard pies, almost frothy in texture, yet it is nonetheless quite pleasant. Custard, meringue, or gelatin, or a mixture of these, provide support for the mousse. The pies are icebox pies, which means they have no-bake fillings that firm up in the refrigerator (for the most part).

8. Ice Cream Pie

This one is very self-explanatory—and quite delicious, to be honest. Sundaes are made by softening ice cream (or sorbet or gelato), mixing in any desired ingredients, then spreading the mixture into a prebaked cookie crust. Like what you’ve seen so far? All of these recipes (as well as many more) may be found in The Perfect Pie. What’s your favorite kind of pie, and why? Please share your thoughts in the comments section!

15 Classic American Desserts No Longer Made — Eat This Not That

Sugary treats are a staple of American culture, and the country’s enduring affection for cakes, pies, and other desserts has been going on for quite some time. Here are 15 traditional American sweets that have, for the most part, vanished from the culinary landscape. And don’t forget to check out these 40 Fast-Culinary Dishes That Defined America for much more interesting food history. Shutterstock We say tomato soup cake when you say tomato soup. Campbell’s is responsible for this cake, which first appeared in the 1920s and 1930s and then ripened in 1940 with a recipe called Steamed FruitNut Pudding, which included steamed pudding with spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and Campbell’s Condensed Tomato Soup and Campbell’s Condensed Tomato Soup.

  1. The recipe even appeared on a Campbell’s soup label in the 1960s, making it the first recipe to do so in the history of the soup canning industry.
  2. Shutterstock This typical American beauty was made with layers of white cake with a fruity and toasted nut filling (figs, raisins, pecans, and walnuts), and it was topped with boiled marshmallow frosting for a sweet and delicious finish.
  3. The Lady Baltimore cake, it turns out, had nothing to do with the city of Baltimore, or even with a lady, as far as anybody could tell.
  4. And don’t forget to check out these 35 Southern Dishes Your Grandparents Used to Make for even more traditional Southern fare.

This is the story of how the cake came to be: in 1927, a Los Angeles insurance agent named Harry Baker (seriously) invented the cake and kept the recipe a closely guarded secret, making it exclusively for Hollywood movie stars and the Brown Derby in Los Angeles, which is believed to have been the world’s first restaurant to serve it.

  1. The rest, as they say, is history!
  2. Shutterstock This iconic American delicacy, also known as Apple Brown Betty, is a fruit-centric dish that originated in the same gene pool as the cobbler and apple crisp.
  3. Typically, baked fruits such as apples, pears, or berries are stacked with sweet buttered crumbs and topped with a dollop of whipped cream before serving.
  4. It is also worth noting that Betty is not the same as Betty Crocker; rather, the origin of the dessert’s name is up for debate.
  5. For the most part, the hermit has vanished, though the cookie does emerge from his solitary confinement on occasion.
  6. Shutterstock In spite of the fact that it is difficult to imagine now, junket was a popular dessert in the twentieth century, particularly in the northeast.
  7. Shutterstock This pie, which was so famous that it was the subject of a song (“Shoo fly, don’t disturb me.”), dates back to the 1800s in Pennsylvania Dutch country.

It’s created with buttered crumbs and molasses, and it’s delicious.

And don’t forget to check out these 15 Healthy Pie Recipes for even more delectable inspiration.

Baked Alaska is a dessert that is made with ice cream, cake, and meringue on the top.

Shutterstock Known as “boozy Bananas Foster,” this extravagant dessert was created in the early 1950s at Brennan’s restaurant in the heart of jazzy New Orleans.

Learn how to harness the weight-loss magic of tea in this related article.

Instead, buttery crackers made fun of the apples that were included in the dish.

Nabisco even printed the recipe on the side of the package of Ritz Crackers.

Because of the cake’s nut shell, it received a lot of positive feedback, as did the cake’s thick layers of cream cheese, whipped cream, chocolate pudding mix, vanilla pudding mix, and chopped nuts.

Shutterstock This alcoholic cake (thus the name “tipsy”) is made using sponge cake (or occasionally stale pound cake) and soaked in sherry and brandy before being served.

Shutterstock Rewind the time to colonial America, when elections were a national holiday, and the results were celebrated with cake while the votes were being tabulated, which may take many days or weeks.

Shutterstock The Parker House Hotel in downtown Boston holds the distinction of being the site of the invention of the Boston cream pie in the mid-1800s, however there is some speculation that it was actually originated somewhere else.

It used to be highly popular in New England, and while you can still get it if you seek hard enough, especially in tourist areas, it is no longer nearly as popular as it once was, when Boston Brahmins baked it on a regular basis.

A typical chess pie, on the other hand, is a straightforward dish that requires only a few ingredients: butter, loads of sugar, flour, milk, cornmeal, eggs, and a splash of vinegar (there are also variations like lemon and chocolate).

In the South, it was revered as a delectable dessert fit for any queen (or bishop, knight, or rook), and it is said to have gotten its start there.

Rustic French Apple Tart

This French apple tart, which is similar to an apple pie but does not require a pie pan, is composed of a thin layer of cinnamon-scented apples on top of a buttery, flaky crust. The image that comes to mind when we think of French sweets is generally of posh pâtisseries filled with towers of pastel-colored macarons and glossy fruit tarts. However, when the French bake at home, they keep things as simple as possible. “No matter how stylish the hostess, her handmade dessert usually looked as rustic as if it had come from a farmhousegrand-mère,” writes one of my favorite culinary writers, Dorie Greenspan, of her time living in France.

In fact, she adds that the recipes are so tried and true that “many French women prepare them without recipes, orau pif.” This free-form French apple dessert is the kind of thing a French cook would whip together on the spur of the moment.

I understand that the very notion of making a handmade pastry crust might send some people fleeing for the hills, but this tart dough is almost flawless and simple to roll out – plus it comes together in under a minute in a food processor — Furthermore, the beauty of a free-form tart is that you don’t have to mess with crimping the dough into a pie dish; instead, you simply drape it over the fruit in a casual manner.

Because of its faults, this dish has a certain allure.

What you’ll need to make a french apple tart

Just a word of caution before we get started on the recipe: you might be tempted to stuff the pie with more apples, but trust me when I say that less is more with this sort of dish. A significant amount of liquid is released by the apples, which can seep out of the pie and create a mess of the crust and your oven. It’s also important to select baking-friendly apples, such as Fuji and Granny Smith varieties as well as Jonagold and Jonathan varieties, Golden Delicious, Gala, and Honey Crisp varieties.

How to make a french apple tart

Make the pastry first, and then proceed with the rest of the recipe. Combine the flour, salt, and sugar in a food processor equipped with a steel blade and pulse until smooth. Briefly pulse to blend, then add the pieces of chilled butter one at a time until well combined. Process for only 5 seconds, or until the butter is the size of peas, depending on your processor. Sprinkle the cold water over the mixture and process for approximately 5 seconds, or until the mixture is wet and extremely crumbly.

  • Work the dough in small circular motions just until it comes together into a cohesive ball.
  • Make sure to re-flour your work area and to lightly sprinkle the dough with flour.
  • While you are preparing the filling, transfer the dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and place in the refrigerator (you will be rolling the dough out further on the parchment paper, so go ahead and clean your work area).
  • Combine the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, melted butter, and salt in a mixing bowl.
  • Remove the dough from the refrigerator and place it on the counter with the parchment paper on top.
  • It’s quite OK if the edges are a touch ragged.
  • 1 tablespoon of flour should be sprinkled equally over the pastry.
See also:  What Dessert Do You Serve With Cottage Pie

Don’t be concerned about making things appear flawless!

Using a free-form motion, fold the edges of the dough over the apples, working your way around the apple slices and forming pleats as you go.

Brush the pleated dough with the beaten egg, using a pastry brush, to ensure that it is equally coated.

Then, while you’re preheating the oven, place the constructed tart in the refrigerator for 15 to 20 minutes.

Remove the pan from the oven and set it aside to cool.

Heat in the microwave for about 20 seconds, or until the mixture begins to bubble.

Transfer the tart to a serving dish or cutting board by using two big spatulas to help it along.

Slice and serve immediately, either warm or at room temperature. The tart is best served the same day it is cooked, but leftovers can be kept on the counter for a few days if they are lightly covered with plastic wrap.

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  • Make the pastry first, and then proceed with the rest of the steps. Combine the flour, salt, and sugar in the bowl of a food processor equipped with a steel blade. Combine by pulsing for a few seconds, then add the chilled butter chunks. It should take no more than 5 seconds to process just enough butter to be the size of peas. Sprinkle the ice water over the mixture and pulse for approximately 5 seconds, or until the mixture is wet and crumbly. Prepare a lightly floured work area by transferring the dough. Work the dough in small circles for a few minutes, just until it comes together into a ball. Form a disk out of the dough. Dust your work area once again and sprinkle flour on top of the dough. Roll the dough into a circle 8 to 10 inches in diameter, rotating it as you go and adding extra flour as needed to keep it from sticking to the rolling pin or the counter. While you are preparing the filling, transfer the dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and chill until needed (you will be rolling the dough out even more on the parchment paper, so go ahead and clean your work area now). To prepare the filling, follow these steps: 1. To prepare the apples, peel, core, and cut them into 1/8-inch thick slices (you should have approximately 4 cups total) and set them in a large mixing bowl with the sugar. In a large mixing bowl, combine the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, butter, and salt. Using your hands, mix everything together. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and place it on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Make a 14-inch circle out of the dough by rolling it out straight on the parchment paper and making it approximately 1/8 inch thick. Although some of the margins may be ragged, this is perfectly acceptable to me. Place the parchment paper and dough back on the baking sheet — the pastry should curve up the lip of the pan as you place it back on the sheet. Over the pastry, evenly distribute 1 tablespoon of flour. To assemble the apple slices on top, arrange them in overlapping concentric circles until they reach within 3 inches of the edge. Make no attempt to make things appear flawless! Overall, it won’t make much of a difference, and you don’t want the dough to become too warm. Making pleats as you go is easy if you use a free-form folding technique. Work your way around the apples, folding the dough edges over them as you go. Using a pinch of dough from the edge, you may repair any tears. Brush the pleated dough with the beaten egg, using a pastry brush, to ensure that it is well covered. Top the fruit with 1 tablespoon of the turbinado sugar and 1 tablespoon over the top crust of the tart. Then, while you’re preheating the oven, place the constructed tart in the refrigerator for 15 to 20 minutes to cool. 35-45 minutes, or until the apples are soft and the crust is golden and cooked through, depending on your oven. Transfer the pan to a cooling rack and allow it to cool completely before using it again. Preparing the optional glaze: In a small bowl, combine the apricot jam and 1-1/2 tablespoons water and set aside while the tart cools. Microwave for about 20 seconds, or until the mixture begins to bubble. Then, using a pastry brush, lightly coat the apples with the apricot syrup to finish them. Transfer the tart to a serving dish or cutting board by using two big spatulas to lift it up. Warm or at room temperature, slice and serve the dish. Even though the tart is best served the same day it is cooked, leftovers can be kept on the counter for a few days if they are kept loosely covered.

Rustic French Apple Tart

Begin by preparing the puff pastry. Combine the flour, salt, and sugar in a food processor equipped with a steel blade. Add the chunks of chilled butter and pulse quickly to mix. Process for about 5 seconds, or until the butter is the size of peas. Sprinkle the cold water over the mixture and process for approximately 5 seconds, or until the mixture is wet and crumbly. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work area and knead until smooth. Gently knead the dough a few times until it comes together into a cohesive ball.

  • Re-flour your work area and lightly sprinkle the dough with flour.
  • While you are preparing the filling, transfer the dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and chill until needed (you will be rolling the dough out even more on the parchment paper, so go ahead and clean your work area).
  • Combine the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, melted butter, and salt in a large mixing bowl.
  • Remove the dough from the fridge and place it on the counter with the parchment paper on top.
  • It’s acceptable if the edges are a touch ragged around the edges.
  • 1 tablespoon of flour should be distributed equally over the pastry.
  • Don’t be concerned about making things appear flawless!

In a free-form fashion, fold the edges of the dough over the apples, working your way around and producing pleats as you go.

Using a pastry brush, evenly brush the beaten egg onto the pleated dough.

Then, while you’re preheating the oven, place the prepared tart in the refrigerator for 15 to 20 minutes to cool.

Transfer the pan to a cooling rack and set aside.

Heat in the microwave for about 20 seconds, or until the mixture starts to bubble.

Transfer the tart to a serving dish or cutting board using two big spatulas. Warm or at room temperature, slice and serve. The tart is best served the same day it is prepared, but leftovers can be kept on the counter for a few days if kept loosely covered.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, spooned and leveled
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt. one and a half sticks (about 12 tablespoons) of extremely cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup extremely chilled water

For the Filling

  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1-3/4 pounds baking apples (3 big) (see note)
  • 1/3 cup sugar

For AssemblingBaking

  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar
  • 1 tablespoon apricot jelly or jam, optional for glaze
  • 1 tablespoon butter, softened

Instructions

  1. Make the crust by combining the following ingredients: Prepare a baking sheet by lining it with parchment paper. Combine the flour, salt, and sugar in a food processor equipped with a steel blade and pulse until smooth. Combine by pulsing for a few seconds. Process for about 5 seconds, or until the butter is the size of peas, until the butter is smooth and creamy. Sprinkle the cold water over the mixture and process for approximately 5 seconds, or until the mixture is wet and extremely crumbly. Turn out the dough onto a work surface that has been lightly dusted with flour and knead a few times, just until it comes together into a cohesive ball. Form the dough into a disk using your hands. Make sure to re-flour your work area and to lightly sprinkle the dough with flour. Roll the dough into a circle 8 to 10 inches in diameter, rotating it as you go and adding extra flour as needed to keep it from sticking to the rolling pin or counter. Transfer the dough to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and place in the refrigerator while you make the filling (you’ll be rolling the dough out even further on the parchment paper, so go ahead and clean your work area)
  2. Make the filling by following these steps: Apples should be peeled, cored, and cut into 1/8-inch-thick slices (you should have approximately 4 cups total), and placed in a large mixing basin. Toss in the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, melted butter, and salt until everything is well-combined. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and place it on the counter with the parchment paper on top. Roll the dough out onto the parchment paper into a 14-inch circle that is approximately 1/8 inch thick, right on the parchment paper. It’s quite OK if the edges are a touch ragged. Replacing the parchment paper and dough on the baking sheet – the pastry should curve up the edge of the pan
  3. And Assemble the tart as follows: Sprinkle the flour over the pastry in a uniform layer. To assemble the apple slices on top, arrange them in overlapping concentric circles until they are 3 inches from the edge. Don’t be concerned about making things appear flawless! It won’t make much of a difference in the end result, and you don’t want the dough to become too warm. Using a free-form motion, fold the edges of the dough over the apples, working your way around the apple slices and forming pleats as you go. Using a pinch of dough from the edge, repair any tears that have occurred. Brush the pleated dough with the beaten egg, using a pastry brush, to ensure that it is equally coated. 1 tablespoon of the turbinado sugar should be sprinkled over the top crust, and 1 tablespoon should be sprinkled over the fruit. Refrigerate the tart for 15 to 20 minutes after it has been made
  4. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 350°. In addition, place an oven rack in the center of the oven. Place the pan in the oven and bake for 55 to 65 minutes, or until the apples are soft and the crust is golden and crisp. This is quite OK if part of the tart’s liquid drips onto the pan.) After baking, scrape any burned parts from the tart once it has finished baking.) The juices will burn on the pan, but the tart itself should be alright. Remove the pie from the pan and set it aside to cool. While the tart is cooling, prepare the optional glaze. In a small mixing bowl, combine the apricot jam and 1-1/2 tablespoons water until well combined. Heat in the microwave for about 20 seconds, or until the mixture begins to bubble. Toss the apples with the apricot syrup, using a pastry brush, then move the tart to a serving dish or cutting board with two big spatulas. Slice and serve immediately, either warm or at room temperature. Even though the tart is best served the same day it is cooked, leftovers can be kept on the counter for a few days if they are kept loosely covered. Note: Make careful to use baking apples that will keep their form when cooked, such as Honeycrisp, Jonagold, Fuji, Granny Smith, or Golden Delicious, to ensure a successful outcome. Additionally, for the finest flavor, combine a variety of varietals. Prepare Ahead of Time: The dough may be made up to 3 days ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator. To make rolling easier, let it sit at room temperature for approximately 15 minutes or until it becomes malleable. Instructions for Making a Freezer-Friendly Recipe: The constructed tart can be frozen for up to 3 months after it has been formed. To freeze the tart, set it on a baking sheet and store it in the freezer until it is completely frozen, then wrap it firmly. (Be sure to brush the tart with the beaten egg and sprinkle the sugar onto the crust just before baking it.) Directly from the freezer, bake the cookies. (It may take a few more minutes to bake from frozen, depending on your oven.)

Nutrition Information

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  • Caloric intake per slice (eight servings)
  • Fat intake per slice (21 g)
  • Saturated fat intake per slice (13 g)
  • Carbohydrate intake per slice (49 g)
  • Sugar intake per slice (26 g)
  • Fiber intake per slice (three grams)
  • Protein intake per slice (4 grams)
  • Sodium intake per slice (195 mg)
  • Cholesterol intake per slice (73 mg).

This website has been developed and published only for the purpose of providing information. Neither I nor the Food and Drug Administration are qualified nutritionists, and the nutritional information on this site has not been examined or approved in any way by a nutritionist or the FDA. It should not be assumed that nutritional information is provided as a guarantee; rather, it is provided as a convenience. Edamam.com, a nutritional calculator on the internet, was used to calculate the information.

A variety of factors, including as the product kinds or brands that are purchased, natural changes in fresh produce, and the method that ingredients are prepared, affect the nutritional information that is provided by a particular recipe.

Using your favourite nutrition calculator, you should calculate the nutritional information for a specific dish using the exact components that were used in the recipe in order to receive the most accurate nutritional information.

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