What Is The Dessert Called That Uses Pie Crust And No Pie Pan But Folds Yje Edges In

EASY BLUEBERRY GALETTE

With this luscious and juicy Blueberry Galette, the phrase “as easy as pie” takes on a new meaning. This rustic pie does not necessitate the use of pie crust expertise. The pastry shell is folded over the fruit filling and baked till golden brown. Warm with a dollop of vanilla ice cream, this dish is the best! Make sure to sign up for myemail. to receive new recipes and ideas directly in your inbox!

Rustic Blueberry Galette

For some reason, the combination of fresh fruit filling and handmade crust brings me great delight. Not much beats the fragrance of a freshly made pie crust chilling in the kitchen after a long day at work. Despite the fact that this dish is not technically a pie, this blueberry galette has all of the same characteristics that make it just as tasty, if not better, than your usual pie. The luscious fresh berries are transformed into a wonderfully sweet and tart filling, which is then baked into a crisp and flaky handmade crust to create a dessert that is suitable for any celebration.

What is A Galette?

If you’ve come to this page because you were taken in by the delectable sight of this delicacy, but you’re still not sure what a galette is, first and foremost, you’re not alone (I’ve been there, done that), so bear with me while I explain what a galette is. You may think of this blueberry galette as a more relaxed version of your regular blueberry pie. That brother who chose to go their own way rather than follow their family’s route, yet somehow managed to turn out just fine, is a good example of this phenomenon.

Galette may also be thought of as a type of open-faced pie, which is another way to describe it.

How To Make The Best Blueberry Galette

  • To Make the Crust: In a mixer or food processor, combine the flour, salt, and sugar to form the dough for the pie crust. Afterwards, cut or grate the cold butter into tiny pieces and add to the flour mixture, mixing with a pastry blender until everything is well incorporated. Once the ingredients are incorporated, gently add water while mixing with a fork until the mixture stays together and forms a dough. Make the Dough into a Ball: Prepare the pie crust by patting and forming the dough into a ball, then flouring the work area and rolling out the crust to be two inches bigger than the pie pan. Prepare the pie crust by pressing it into the pie pan. Prepare the filling by doing the following: To create the filling, in a large mixing bowl, combine your fresh or frozen berries, sugar, flour, and lemon juice
  • Set aside. Putting the Pie Together: It’s time to start putting your pie together! Fill the pie crust halfway with the berry filling, then begin folding the sides of the dough over and creasing as necessary. Then, bake it in the preheated oven until the filling begins to bubble and serve it warm with ice cream

Tips For Making The Best Crust For Your Blueberry Galette

We are all aware that the crust of a dessert is nearly usually the greatest portion, and that it can make or break the entire dish if it is not prepared properly. In order to ensure that I always have a flawlessly crisp and tasty crust, here are a few ticks and ticks I’ve picked up during the years. CHOOSE A FOOD PROCESSOR FOR TRUSTWORTHINESS: The flour, salt, sugar, and salt should all be mixed together in a food processor fitted with the blade attachment until everything is well blended. Pulse in the butter until the mixture resembles sand, about 30 seconds (about 7-10 pulses).

If the mixture is too dry, pulse in up to 2 additional teaspoons of cold water, 1 spoonful at a time, until the mixture is moistened again.

Place a second piece of parchment paper over the dough, and roll it out into a 10 to 12-inch circle that is approximately 1/8-inch thick.

Insert a baking sheet beneath the parchment paper with the dough in it and peel away the top layer of parchment paper. IN ORDER TO ADD GLAMOR AND COLOR TO CREDIT: Using an egg wash, brush the crust and sprinkle with coarse sugar to finish it off.

Can I Use Frozen Berries To Make A Blueberry Galette?

It’s one of my favorite things about baking with berries of any kind since you can nearly always substitute frozen for fresh, which means that any season can be blueberry recipe baking season if you want it to be! If you choose to use frozen berries for this blueberry galette recipe, simply remove them from the freezer for a few minutes to allow them to defrost before proceeding to make the filling and topping.

Do I Have To Make My Own Pie Crust?

While I adore the handmade crust that was used in this blueberry galette, I recognize that not everyone has the luxury of time to make a crust from scratch on a consistent basis. If you’re short on time, you can prepare this dish even faster by using the premade pie crust and rolling it out a little to make it a little larger than your pie plate before baking it.

More Blueberry Recipes You’ll Obsess Over!

Lemon Blueberry Muffins– The vibrant tang of lemon combined with the sweetness of ripe blueberries makes these muffins a treat to look forward to in the morning. The streusel topping elevates these to a whole new level of deliciousness! Thus, they are the ideal complement to any breakfast, brunch, or snack time menu item. The Best Homemade Blueberry Muffins – Recipe & Instructions Don’t miss out on these delicious, easy-to-make, soft and fluffy homemade blueberry pancakes. They’re usually a hit since they’re packed with fresh berries and overflowing with flavor.

A simple lemon shortbread crust is filled with creamy yogurt, whipped topping, and blueberries, and the whole thing is covered with lemon blueberry fruit spread for a delicious dessert.

Cobbler with Black and Blue Mixed Berries– A traditional dish that everyone enjoys!

With berries in it, this Rosé Summer Sangria is light and refreshing, excellent for cooling down in the summer heat.

Like This Blueberry Galette Recipe? Pin It!

A pastry blender, also known as a dough cutter, is an essential tool for any dish that asks for a streusel or crumb topping. It’s what makes it possible to achieve the correct texture with relative simplicity. Glass Bowl SetEveryone’s kitchen should be stocked with a decent collection of mixing bowls. This set is my favorite since it comes in a range of sizes, ensuring that I always have just what I need on hand. Measuring Cups Made of Stainless Steel This set of stainless steel measuring cups is by far my favorite set of measuring cups!

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Facebook|Twitter|Pinterest|Instagram Fill out the form below to receive an email in your inbox when a new recipe is published: SUBSCRIBE TO OUR FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER This article was originally published in June 2012.

DATE CHANGED: APRIL 2020 We’ve updated this page to include additional information and better photographs! There have been no alterations to the original recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups all-purpose flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 cup cold butter (1 stick), 2-4 teaspoons ice water

For Pie Filling:

  • 2 cups blueberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1-2 tablespoons flour (depending on how juicy the blueberries are)
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Instructions

In the case of the Crust

  1. In a medium-sized mixing bowl (see notes for food processor methods), combine the flour, salt, and sugar
  2. Prepare the flour mixture by chopping or grating cold butter into tiny pieces and mixing it in. Using a pastry blender (or two knives), work the butter into the flour until the mixture resembles sand
  3. Set aside. Toss with a fork as you slowly add water and whisk until the mixture comes together
  4. Form a ball by patting it down
  5. Prepare a floured work area and roll out the pie crust to a size that is two inches bigger than the pie pan. Prepare the pie crust by pressing it into the pie pan.

To be filled out:

  1. In a large mixing basin, combine the berries, sugar, flour, and lemon juice

How to Make a Pie:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Fill the pie shell with the berry filling. Fold the crust edges over the filling, creasing as necessary. To seal the creases in the crust (which will assist to keep them folded after baking), wet your finger with a small amount of water. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling, in a preheated 350°F oven. Serve while still heated with ice cream.

Notes

  • MAKE USE OF A FOOD PROCESSOR FOR PERFECTION: Pulse the flour mixture with the sugar, salt, and kosher salt in a food processor fitted with the blade attachment until everything is well blended. Pulse in the butter until the mixture resembles sand, about 30 seconds (about 7-10 pulses). Slowly put in 2 tablespoons of cold water and pulse around 4 times, or until the dough turns crumbly but still stays together when squeezed, according to your preference. If the mixture is too dry, pulse in up to 2 additional teaspoons of cold water, 1 spoonful at a time, until the desired consistency is reached.
  • Need A PAN INSTEAD OF A PIE PLATE: A galette may be prepared without the use of a pie pan
  • Simply set the crust ball on a piece of parchment paper and bake as directed on the package. Place a second piece of parchment paper over the dough, and roll it out into a 10 to 12-inch circle that is approximately 1/8-inch thick. Insert a baking sheet beneath the parchment with the dough in it, then peel away the top layer of parchment
  • IN ORDER TO ADD GLAMOR AND COLOR TO CREDIT: Using an egg wash, brush the crust with coarse sugar and bake for 15 minutes. QUICK TIP: If you want to prepare this dish even faster, you may use refrigerated pie crust and spread it out a little bit so that it is slightly larger than your pie plate.
Nutrition Information:

Yield:6Serving Size: 1Servings per container: Calories:341 16 g of total fat 10 g of saturated fat 1 gram of trans fat 5 g of unsaturated fat Cholesterol:41mg Sodium:300mg Carbohydrates:48g Fiber:2g Sugar:24g Protein:4g Using the ingredients and cooking techniques specified in each dish, we have approximated the nutritional value. This information is intended to be used solely for informative reasons. Please keep in mind that nutritional information may vary depending on the manner of preparation, the origin of the components, and the freshness of the products used.

Buttery, Flaky Pie Crust Recipe

  • The all-purpose flour provides the dough the firmness it needs to keep its shape in the oven while preserving any creative designs that may have been added. When the flour and butter are mixed together in a blitz technique, a dough that is flexible yet sturdy is produced, making cracks and tears a thing of the past. One cycle of folding produces eight primary layers with the least amount of effort. Refrigerating the dough after it has been shaped ensures that it is completely cooled and relaxed, allowing it to retain its flakes in the oven.

Creating the most delicious pies in the world has been an American tradition for more than 200 years, with some even going so far as to associate pastries with patriotism—”as American as apple pie,” a dish that requires not one but two pastry crusts. Yet, for some reason, we’ve come to see it as a particularly difficult endeavor, as if 19th-century grandmothers weren’t capable of producing delightfully fluffy pies in the absence of electricity, air conditioning, or even readily available sticks of butter.

  1. While Kenji uses a food processor to make his quick pie crust, my technique is significantly more low-tech than his.
  2. Before you can get into the nitty-gritty of my approach, you must first relearn all you have learnt from previous recipes.
  3. A bad attitude to have when you’re in the kitchen because fear breeds anger, anger breeds hatred, and hate breeds even more pain.
  4. We’re so terrified of gluten that we’ll do almost everything to get away from it.
  5. The realization that gluten is not the enemy of our dough is necessary in order to alleviate the misery.
  6. Gluten is the binding agent that holds a pastry together and provides it its strength and elasticity.
  7. We should want pie dough to feel as comfy as an old leather jacket, flexible and velvety while yet being sturdy.

It restores equilibrium to the force, resulting in pie dough that is both supple and crunchy.

The amount of ingredients may appear excessive, but it is a tried-and-true pastry formula that increases the elasticity of the dough while baking a pie.

Because of this, even the bottom crust of a cherry pie will be flaky and crisp, and there will be no need for pre-baking.

However, the procedure for making the crust extra flaky is really rather enjoyable, especially if you’re the type of person who enjoys popping bubble wrap and making paper aircraft, because it ultimately boils down to crushing and folding the ingredients together.

That’s all there is to it; there are no “coarse meal” or “pea-sized chunks” to try to determine by sight.

Knead the dough until it is lumpy and the butter has been mixed; the butter will act as a binder while at the same time preventing the gluten from getting dangerously strong.

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Seriously, go ahead and do it!

When you’re rolling out the dough, use as much flour as you need to feel completely confident.

It’s a representation of your own particular style, just like a beautifully produced lightsaber would be.

Others enjoy the smooth motion of an American pin or the fixed handles of a Shaker-style pin.

Bringing each 10-inch side toward the center, bring both sides together like a menu, and then fold the entire piece in half (top to bottom).

You’ll be rewarded with enormous layers that will make everyone gooooohandahhhh in exchange for that smidgeon of work.

Immediately after folding it, the dough is ready to be used right away—no waiting or chilling necessary.

Once a block of dough has been refrigerated, rolling it out will soften the chilled butter and “awaken” the gluten, necessitating the need to chill and relax the dough once more before it can be used.

And to make matters worst, if the gluten is not released, it will turn to the dark side and cause our crust to shrink.

Although they will appear somewhat square, don’t be concerned with the difficulties of attempting to make everything precisely round.

.and yes, I did say sling.

It is not need to worry about splits in the dough while folding and shaping it because there is enough of butter on hand.

Roll the remaining dough into a rectangle measuring nine by fifteen inches.

Don’t cut those pieces yet, or they’ll shrink when the dough relaxes and shrinks to fit your design.

Vicky Wasik is a model and actress.

As previously stated, cooling is not just for the purpose of relaxing the gluten; it is also for the purpose of chilling the butter to aid in the preservation of all those leafy sheets.

If this is the case, it is likely that the ambient heat in your kitchen is causing the butter to melt too quickly (more on the importance ofdough temperature here).

It’s also interesting looking at how different pie plates, whether made of aluminum, ceramic, or glass, might impact the texture of your crust’s bottom crust. Recognize that you possess the ability to create a flawless pie. Do. Alternatively, do not. There is no such thing as a second chance.

  • 6 to 8 ounces (225g) low-protein all-purpose flour, such as Gold Medal Blue Label (1 2/3 cups
  • 225g), plus additional flour for dusting
  • Half an ounce of sugar (one tablespoon
  • 15 grams)
  • One teaspoon (4 grams) Diamond Crystalkosher salt (for table salt, use half as much by volume or the same weight as for crystal kosher salt)
  • 2 sticks (2 sticks
  • 225g) cold unsalted American-style butter, directly from the fridge
  • 4 ounces cold tap water (1/2 cup
  • 115g)
  1. In order to make the dough: In a medium-sized mixing basin, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Cut the butter into cubes no smaller than 1/2 inch in size and toss it with the flour mixture to break up the chunks of butter. Simply smash each cube flat with your fingertips—all that’s there is to it! There will be no rubbing or cutting. Water should be stirred in and then kneaded against the edges of the bowl until it comes together in a shaggy ball of dough. If the dough temperature does not register between 65 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit (18 and 21 degrees Celsius), it should be refrigerated momentarily before rolling and folding (see note). Create the layers by: Roll the dough out onto a work surface that has been generously floured into an about 10- by 15-inch rectangle. Fold the 10-inch edges of the package into the middle, and then close it like a book to seal it. Fold the paper in half again, this time bringing the short sides together to form a thick block. Using a sharp knife or a bench scraper, cut the mixture in half. In order to proceed, the dough temperature should be between 65 and 70°F (18 and 21°C)
  2. If not, it should be refrigerated momentarily before proceeding (see note). When making a single-crust pie, use as much flour as you need to roll out one piece into a 14-inch circle
  3. This size allows for plenty of room to line the pie plate while still leaving enough overhang to form a generous border around the edge. A small size makes it difficult to shape edges, and a thicker size does not crisp as well as a smaller size does. Transform the dough into a 9-inch pie plate
  4. The dough should be easy to handle and should not necessitate any special techniques to transfer it. Using a pastry brush, dust off any excess flour before nestling the dough into the corners of the pan. Make a 1 1/4-inch overhang on the edge of the fabric by trimming it with scissors or kitchen shears. Fold the overhang over itself to create a thick border that sits on the top edge of the pie plate rather than the bottom edge, as shown. Crust can be shaped or crimped to your liking. Repeat the process with the remaining dough. Wrap in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours or up to overnight. Follow the directions on the package for your favorite recipe. Vicky Wasik is a model and actress. For a Double-Crusted Pie, follow these steps: Roll out one piece of dough into a 14-inch circle, using as much flour as necessary
  5. This size allows for plenty of room to line a pie plate, with enough overhang to form a generous border. A small size makes it difficult to shape edges, and a thicker size does not crisp as well as a smaller size does. Transform the dough into a 9-inch pie plate
  6. The dough should be easy to handle and should not necessitate any special techniques to transfer it. Using a pastry brush, dust off any excess flour before nestling the dough into the corners of the pan. Make a 1 1/4-inch overhang on the edge of the fabric by trimming it with scissors or kitchen shears. Roll the remaining dough into a solid top crust as you did before
  7. If you want a lattice-top pie, roll it into a 9- by 15-inch rectangle instead. Transfer to a baking sheet or a cutting board lined with parchment paper. A sheet of parchment paper will prevent the dough from absorbing any flavors from the cutting board. Wrap both portions in plastic wrap and place them in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours or overnight. Use as directed in your favorite recipe
  8. After filling the pie and sealing the crusts together, place them in the refrigerator for 30 minutes before baking. For aBlind-Baked Pie, use the following ingredients: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit (180 degrees Celsius) with the rack in the lower-middle position. Line a large sheet of aluminum foil with a pie shell that has been chilled for at least 2 hours (as described in Step 3) and press it into the pie shell so that it conforms to the curves of the plate. In some cases, a second sheet of foil may be required for complete coverage. Fill to the brim with sugar, transfer to a half sheet pan, and bake for 60 to 75 minutes, or until the sugar is fully set and golden around the edges. Fold the long sides of the foil toward the center, gather the short sides, and carefully transfer the sugar to a heat-safe bowl with both hands. Allow sugar to cool to room temperature before using. Continue baking the crust for a few minutes longer if necessary to brown the bottom of the pie.

Special equipment

pastry brush, 9-inch pie plate (ideally tempered glass; see note), rolling pin

Notes

If you compare it to stoneware or heavy enameled ceramic pie plates, tempered-glass pie plates transmit heat more rapidly and evenly, which results in a crust that bakes up light and crisp rather than oily or squishy. When the temperature in the room rises over 74°F (23°C), kitchen equipment and pantry staples will function as a heat source for the butter, resulting in a sticky dough that cannot be worked out. If it’s hot in your kitchen, follow these proactive techniques to keep your dough temperature under control.

Make-Ahead and Storage

Preparation time: up to 24 hours before usage, the dough should be produced ahead of time and refrigerated. A frozen block, rolled out, or formed in a pan are all options for storing the dough for longer periods of time. The dough will still need to rest/relax for at least 2 hours after rolling and shaping if it has been frozen in a block form before rolling.

This Recipe Appears In

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  • How to Select the Appropriate Pie Pan (Hint: Buying in Bulk Saves Money)
  • Flaky, crisp, and quick: Flaky, crisp, and quick: Learn how to make a Peach Galette (also known as a Freeform Pie). Don’t Blame the Humidity: How “Room Temperature” Can Ruin a Pie Dough
  • Don’t Blame the Humidity: How “Room Temperature” Can Ruin a Pie Dough Follow These 6 Simple Steps to Make a Perfect Blind-Baked Pie Crust
  • Instructions for Baking a Pie With Frozen Fruit
  • How to Thaw and Freeze a Fresh-Fruit Pie
  • How to Make a Fruit Pie
  • A Crash Course in Mastering Pie Dough
  • A Crash Course in Mastering Pie Dough

How to Convert Your Favorite Pie into a Slab Pie

Created on the 15th of October, 2019. When it comes to pie, more is always better. The Pillsbury team is fully aware of this philosophy, which is why we have so many delicious slab pies available. They’re just as simple to prepare as a traditional pie, they’re just as tasty, and they can feed a large group of people—a triple-win! Let’s go over everything you need to know about sizing your favorite pie and why our sheet-pan pies deserve a spot on your dessert table in detail.

What is a Slab Pie?

The person who came up with the idea of slab pies deserves a kiss on the mouth. Slab pie is a simple, clever pie that feeds a large number of people with little effort and cleanup. It doesn’t matter if you like the chocolatey creaminess ofFrench Silk, the dual-tasking flavors of Pumpkin-Pecan, or the typical fruity-freshness of our Blueberry Slab Pie; there’s always a good reason to choose a slab rather than a piece of pie. Slab pies, on average, feed 16 people, ensuring that no one will go hungry if one of them is placed on the dessert table during a gathering.

You don’t have a pie pan?

Another attractive feature of a slab pie is that it is baked on a 15x10x1-inch jelly roll pan, which is somewhat smaller than a standard baking sheet and has a 1-inch lip.

Nevertheless, the actual question remains: “What if I have a favorite conventional pie recipe that I’d like to adapt into a slab pie to serve a large number of people?” We’re glad you inquired!

We visited with our Pillsbury Kitchens specialists to get their take on everything you should consider before attempting your own experiments in the kitchen.

How to Convert a Standard Pie to a Slab Pie

If you want to learn more about pies (which is one of our favorite topics to discuss), we asked our team in the Pillsbury Kitchens how to simply convert our beloved 9-inch circular pies into rectangular, slab-style pies that can be baked in a sheet pan. We had a great response. Moreover, while we walked away from our conversations with three wonderful new traditional slab pie recipes—Pumpkin Slab Pie, Apple Slab Pie, and Pecan Slab Pie—we also realized that the answer to our query could not be addressed with a straightforward formula.

Let’s go through each of these in further depth!

Adjust the Pie Crust

Let’s look at some basic math: The usual idea is to double the quantity of crust you’d need for a 9-inch round standard-size pie in order to make a 15-by-10-by-1-inch slab pie, according to the recipe. For example, if you require one box (14.1 oz)PillsburyTM refrigerated pie crust to create a conventional double-crust pie, you’ll need two boxes, or four pie crusts, to make a double-crust slab pie with two layers of pie crust. PillsburyTM refrigerated pie crust is used for all of our slab pies.

  • To prepare a slab pie, take the pie crusts from their pouches and unroll them on a lightly floured surface, stacking them one on top of the other.
  • Fit the bottom crust into a 15x10x1-inch pan that hasn’t been oiled, pushing it into the corners.
  • Roll out the pie crust to a 17×12-inch rectangle, then set it on top of the filling.
  • Edges should be fluted or crimped.
  • If you’re creating a pie with a lattice top (like our Blueberry Slab Pie), use a pastry cutter or knife to cut the pie dough into 1/2-inch-wide strips.
  • Make a lattice out of the remaining strips by weaving them together with the initial strips.
  • Pinch the corners of the crust together to seal it, tucking any excess pastry crust beneath the crust if required.

Pre-Bake the Crust on Some (But Not All!) Slab Pies

We learned that in order to ensure the bottom crusts of some of our more liquid-based/custard-based filled pies, such as our Pumpkin Slab Pie and Pecan Slab Pie, the bottom crusts must be par-baked, or pre-baked until just browned and set, during our testing of our slab-style pies. Pies with a liquid filling, such as pumpkin and pecan, tend to have a greater fat content, which makes it difficult to bake a bottom crust to its maximum baking potential. A number of additional elements come into play while baking a sheet-pan pie that might affect the conventional outcome of a pie crust, including the fact that the bake time is often reduced to fit the shorter height of the filling.

See also:  What Dessert Can I Make With Pumkin Pie Filling, Sweet Condensed Milk And Chocolate Chips

If the crust rises up during the baking process, gently push it down with the back of a flat metal measuring cup to flatten it.

Many recipes ask for two separate temperatures for these processes, and this is common practice.

The bottom crust bakes through properly in fruit-filled slab pies without the need for a pre-bake because the filling is drier than in custard pie, allowing for greater heat conduction throughout the pie.

Prebaking the pie dough thoroughly before filling it with the no-bake filling is all that is required for slab pies with no-bake fillings.

Consider the Filling

The next time you want to create your favorite standard pie for a large group of people, there are a few tips and methods to keep in mind when it comes to increasing the amount of filling to suit your slab pie. During our testing, we discovered that there is no perfect method for altering the amount of filling used in the recipe. If you want to fill a 15x10x1-inch slab pie, the usual guideline is to prepare 1 1/2 times the quantity of filling you would need for a 9-inch round regular pie. But it’s not always that straightforward.

  • The quantity of some components will need to be increased or decreased based on the original standard pie recipe amounts. Use your best judgment when deciding which ingredients to round up and which to round down, keeping the intended use of each item in mind. Increasing the quantity of sugar in a regular pie recipe by 1.5 times amounts to 1.125, which is why our recipe creators rounded up to 1 1/4 cups sugar in the slab pie recipe. For example, if a standard pie recipe calls for three eggs, you can increase the number to four or five eggs, depending on your preference (keep in mind that eggs help bind the filling and give it a custard-like texture, but they will also increase the amount of overall filling)
  • However, be careful not to overfill your pie crusts with the filling. As an example, in order to account for spill-over during the process of transferring the pie to the oven and baking it, our recipe developers reduced the proportions of pumpkin and milk called for in our standardPerfect Pumpkin Pie by half, but increased the proportions of the remaining ingredients by one-and-half times. As for converting your own recipe, you can use your best judgment to determine the appropriate quantities to employ. Make 1.5 times the quantity of filling and just use half of it for the slab pie (Bonus: Pour any leftover filling into a small oven-safe custard cup or ramekin and bake as a personal-sized crustless pie!). Consider taste, texture, and presentation when creating your slab pie recipe. When making ourPecan Slab Pie, we raised the quantity of salt used in our recipe forEasy Pecan Pie by one-and-a-half times, but we quadrupled the amount of pecans used to ensure that the slab pie was completely covered with pecans. When modifying component amounts, use your best judgment to determine what makes the most sense.

Some ingredients will need to be rounded up or down in order to match the original standard pie recipe quantities. Maintaining an awareness of the function of each element, use your discretion in determining what to round up and what to round down. Consider the following example: if your typical pie recipe asks for 3/4 cup sugar, raising that quantity by 1 1/2 times amounts to 1.125—so our recipe developers rounded up to 1 1/4 cups sugar for our slab pie recipe. For example, if a standard pie recipe calls for three eggs, you can increase the number to four or five eggs, depending on your preference (keep in mind that eggs help bind the filling and give it a custard-like texture, but they will also increase the amount of overall filling); however, be careful not to overfill your pie crusts; To make ourPumpkin Slab Pie, our recipe developers reduced the proportions of pumpkin and milk called for in our standardPerfect Pumpkin Piein order to account for spill-over during the transfer to the oven and while baking, but increased the proportions of the remaining ingredients by one and a half times.

Using your best judgment, you may change the quantities of a recipe that you’ve created yourself.

Consider taste, texture, and presentation while creating your slab pie.

When altering ingredient amounts, use your best judgment to determine what makes sense.

Bake Your Pie (and Watch for Doneness)

Although the oven temperature should remain the same as in the original recipe, the baking time may vary significantly. Generally speaking, use the shortest possible bake time from your normal pie recipe and lower it by 10 minutes—this is the time at which you should begin checking your slab pie for doneness for the first time. If you’re baking our Perfect Apple Pie, you’ll want to bake it at 425°F for 40 to 45 minutes; our Apple Slab Pie will need to bake it at 425°F for 30 to 35 minutes. Make sure to check on your pie every 5 minutes until it seems to be completely cooked.

Visual signals should be used extensively for the greatest effects. When a custard pie is entirely cooked, the filling should be completely set; when a fruit pie is thoroughly baked, the fruit should be soft and the crust should be a deep golden brown.

Cool Completely

It’s ideal to allow the slab pie cool fully on a cooling rack (or fridge, depending on the recipe requirements) before serving it, just like you would with standard-size pies. Once it has been completely cooled or chilled, cut it into squares and serve it immediately!

Tips for Baking Slab Pies

Before you begin baking your slab pies for a large group of people, here are a few additional pointers to help you achieve ultimate slab pie baking success:

  • If you are concerned about drips, use a sheet of aluminum foil on the bottom rack of the oven to collect any spills that may occur while baking. Covering the entire pie with aluminum foil if the crust edges are going too brown in the oven is a good idea. Roll out the pie crust dough between two pieces of baking parchment paper or waxed paper to make cleaning simpler afterward. Try to keep the oven door closed as much as possible while baking to ensure that the oven temperature remains consistent. If feasible, peek through the oven door to check on the doneness of your slab pie (if this is not possible, open and close the oven door rapidly)

Our Favorite Slab Pie Recipes

When it comes to drips, a sheet of aluminum foil on the bottom rack of the oven can collect any spills that may occur while baking. Covering the entire pie with aluminum foil if the crust edges are going too brown in the oven is a good option. Roll out the pie crust dough between two pieces of baking parchment paper or waxed paper to make cleaning simpler later on. Maintain an uniform oven temperature by keeping the oven door closed for as long as feasible while baking. If feasible, peek through the oven door to check on the doneness of your slab pie (if this is not possible, open and close the oven door rapidly);

How to Make Bakery-Worthy Pie Crust Designs

Many moons ago, one of the very first pieces I published for Food52 was on pie-making, which is one of my favorite subjects—and it was also a lovely pie, to boot. Several ornamental edges were covered in that post, but I felt it was past due for a second installment. There are a plethora of techniques for crimping the edge of your lovely pie crust—don’t forget to use your index finger! —and with strawberry season almost over and stone fruit, berry, and pumpkin pie season just around the corner, I wanted to provide step-by-step instructions for 9 gorgeous borders.

Use a Pie Recipe you love.

The subject of baking pies—and making them look beautiful, to boot—was one of the very first pieces I published for Food52 many moons ago. That post addressed some ornamental edges, and I decided it was about time for a second look at the subject. You may use your index finger or your thumb to crimp the border of your lovely pie crust in a variety of ways. In honor of strawberry season, which is almost over, and in anticipation of stone fruit, berry, and pumpkin pie seasons to come, I wanted to share step-by-step instructions for making nine lovely borders.

Make sure your pastry is well-chilled.

Start with a chilled dough and then refrigerate it once you’ve flattened it out and lined the baking sheet with it. It will even be chilled with the extra hanging all about before it is trimmed; this will allow the dough to relax while also preventing it from shrinking! The freezer works well for me, but be aware that if your dough is too frozen, it may be difficult to deal with and may break.

Give yourself some excess.

This is one of my favorite pie techniques, and it’s very useful for creating gorgeous borders on pies and tarts. When trimming away the excess dough from the edge of the pie dish, be sure to leave approximately 1 inch of extra dough around the edge of the plate. Using your fingers, fold the excess under itself and carefully push it all the way around the plate to seal it and make it flush with the edge of the plate. This overabundance serves a few of objectives. First, it results in a thicker “wall” of dough around the edge of the pie plate, which is less likely to fall or shrink in the oven, especially if the pie plate is properly adhered to the pie plate with a well-sealed crimp.

Second, it makes it easy to attach ornamental edges to the finished product.

Finally, but certainly not least, it provides you with even more crunchy, flaky pie dough at the end of each slice, which is very delightful.

Since I feel sorry for the fool who attempts to trick me out of as much crust as possible on my pie, I prefer to add in a little extra crust from the beginning of my baking process.

Rotate the pie plate while you work.

Rather than bending your arms or moving your body to work around the edge of the pie plate, rotate the pie plate intermittently while you crimp. The crimps will be more equal if you continue to work in the same location!

After you’ve got your edge, get it even colder.

As soon as you’ve finished applying your ornamental edge, begin freezing everything down to the last drop (even the freezer). The colder the pie dough is when it is placed in the oven, the more likely it is to hold its shape once baked.

Use a pie plate with a wider edge.

For those of you who are having difficulties keeping your edges from sloping down once they are placed in the oven, here is a troubleshooting technique for you. A number of pie plates have absolutely no edge at all, which means there is a greater margin for error while baking them. If your dough isn’t securely wrapped, crimped, or cooled sufficiently before baking, it may slide down the baking sheet when heated by the oven. By using a pie dish with an edge (at least 1/2-inch wide), you’ve provided yourself with a (literal) support system!.

Linda Xiao captured this image.

Create the crimped edge by pressing your fingers together to form a V-shape around the outside of the pie.

For the classic appearance, I generally keep my fingers around 1/2 inch apart, but lately I’ve been liking the polished look of an even smaller crimp, so I’ve started pinching my fingers together as close together as I possibly can to form an extremely minuscule (but adorable!) crimp.

  1. Your dominant hand will be responsible for the majority of the motion, while your non-dominant hand will be in charge of the shaping. Form a V shape with your dominant hand’s index finger and the index finger and thumb of your non-dominant hand
  2. This may be done with any hand. You can begin anywhere on the pie. Then, using your dominant index finger, press down and slightly outward from the interior of the pie, allowing the V shape of your non-dominant hand to produce a crimp shape from the outer border of the dough as you push down. However, I simply press inward with the V shape
  3. The majority of the movement should be carried out with your dominant hand. The form will be greater if your fingers are broader than your thumbs
  4. Start the next crimp where the last one finished, then continue around the pie until the pie is completely covered. When you’re completed, you may go back around and make any necessary adjustments to the crimps that weren’t quite right.

Your dominant hand will be responsible for the most of the activity, while your non-dominant hand will be in charge of giving the necessary shape and structure. In order to construct a V shape with your dominant hand’s index finger, you should also utilize the index finger and thumb of your non-dominant hand. Take any point on the pie as a starting point. Then, using your dominant index finger, press down and slightly outward from the interior of the pie, allowing the V shape of your non-dominant hand to produce a crimp shape from the outer border of the dough as you push it.

The form will be greater if your fingers are wider than your palm.

Then you may go back around and make any necessary adjustments to the crimps that aren’t quite right.

  1. Your dominant hand will be responsible for the majority of the activity, while your non-dominant hand will be in charge of the shape. Form a V shape with the index finger of your dominant hand and the index finger and thumb of your non-dominant hand
  2. Start at any point on the pie. Push down and slightly outward from the center of the pie with your dominant index finger, allowing the V shape of your non-dominant hand to produce the crimp shape from the outside edge of the dough as you push. My dominant hand should be doing the most of the work, therefore I press inward with the V shape. The form will be greater the broader your fingers are
  3. Start the next crimp where the last one started, then work your way around the pie until you reach the end. When you’re finished, you may go back around and make any necessary adjustments to any misshaped crimps.
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Linda Xiao captured this image. Although this border appears delicate, I believe it is the typical edging approach for the original pithier pastry, which is where I first learned it. However, like with many other decorating techniques, it is completely effective for pie!

The key to achieving this advantage is properly refrigerated pastry. Warm pastry will not keep its form in the least. Because the size of the edge is mostly dictated by the size of your finger, it is not a shape that can be made broader or narrower as you choose.

  1. The first shape will be created by your dominant hand. Use the index finger of your dominant hand to push impressions into the dough around the perimeter of the cookie sheet. Start the next impression where the previous one finishes, then continue all the way around the pie until it is finished. Use your non-dominant hand to hold a paring knife in one hand. Choose one of the indentations, insert your finger into one of the indentations, and press once again. This time, however, place the blade of the paring knife in between the indentation you’re working on and the one next to it to prevent the blade from slipping. Using your index finger, slowly pull the sharp knife towards the center of the pie while pressing outward with your other finger. This will aid in the definition of the rounded portion of the scalloped border. Continue this process all the way around the pie.

Photo by Linda XiaoI really like this one as well. Essentially, it is a combination of two classics: the finger crimp and a forked edge. You must space the crimps a bit wider apart in order for this style to work correctly, leaving yourself enough of area to apply the fork marks later on. Additionally, I think that using a smaller fork with tines that are a bit closer together is really beneficial—but feel free to use whatever you have on hand.

  1. This edge begins in a similar manner as a typical crimp, but in the opposite direction. Your dominant hand will be responsible for the majority of the motion, while your non-dominant hand will be in charge of the shaping. The index finger of your dominant hand should be used to make a V shape, as should the index finger and middle finger of your non-dominant hand
  2. You can begin anywhere on the pie. With your index finger, start at the outer border of the pie and work your way inward
  3. The V will be formed from the inner edge of the pie crust. Then, using your dominant index finger, press down and slightly inward, allowing the V shape of your non-dominant hand to produce the crimp shape as you push. I press outward with the V shape, but just a little bit
  4. The majority of the action should come from your dominant hand, not the other way around. Allow for some space between the finger crimps (I normally leave approximately 1/2 inch between each crimp) so that you have enough area for the fork crimps to be successful. You may use your index finger to push the excess dough in between the crimps flat against the edge of the pie dish once you’ve finished crimping it all the way around. As a result, it is much easier to crimp the fork in a matter of seconds. In between each crimp, press the tines of a fork dusted with flour into the dough you just flattened. Firmly press down on the pie plate, but not so hard that it breaks. Continue to wrap your fingers around the pie

Linda Xiao captured this image. Many galettes are completed in this casual, breezy manner—but why should they get to enjoy all of the fun? This appearance is also great for a classic pie, and it adds a bit additional crust-to-filling action for all of my crust-loving friends out there who enjoy pie crusts. Linda Xiao captured this image.

  1. Ensure that you allow at least 1 inch (and preferably up to 1 1/2 inches) of additional dough all the way around the pie dish when lining it. If you like a more accurate appearance, you may cut the rough edges away with scissors
  2. Otherwise, leave it as is. Fill the pie with the filling, filling it as much as possible so that it is flush with the edge of the pie dish. Once the filling has been placed into the dough, flip one piece of the dough over onto the filling and press down. When you fold the second piece over, make sure it overlaps the prior fold as much as possible. Continue this process all the way around the pie.

Linda Xiao captured this image. Pies will have a wonderful rustic appearance using this technique. You may make it just like you would a standard fork crimp, but with a little bit more. This is a style I enjoy on double-crust pies as well! Varied forks have different thicknesses of tines (as well as different spacing between those tines); you may discover that certain forks have a more appealing appearance than others.

  1. Begin by crimping the dough all around the pie with a fork, keeping the fork tines vertically aligned with the dough (i.e. as though making a cross with the tines and the crust). Firmly press the tines of a floured fork into the pie crust, but not so hard that the dough is mashed down and the pie dish is struck
  2. Press the fork tines horizontally around the pie once again, this time holding the fork tines vertically (i.e. opposite the last crimp, following the crust all the way around). To begin, push using only a few of the fork’s edges, then begin pressing where the last press ended. You’ll end up with small boxes of dough that has been crosshatched
  3. When pressing the dough with a fork, it is possible that the dough may become a little uneven around the borders of the pie. This may be avoided by chilling the crust after you have completed the crosshatch and then using a paring knife to cut away the extra dough, keeping it flush to the edge of the pie while you cut

Linda Xiao captured this image. This is my favorite fork crimp since it not only looks fancy, but it is also very simple to do. The crosshatch follows the same rules as the fork in terms of size as stated above.

  1. To form diagonal lines on the pie, hold a floured fork at a 45-degree angle to the right and move it across the pie. The tine that is farthest to the left will produce a long line, while the tine that is furthest to the right will produce a short line. Press firmly into the dough, but not so hard that you mash the dough and splatter it all over the pie pan. Maintain a 45-degree angle with the fork, this time to the left by rotating it. (Optional) This time, though, you will draw diagonal lines in the other direction. A triangle or chevron-like pattern should be formed by the lines in principle (although even if they don’t line up precisely, the design is still really spectacular)! Continue pressing firmly into the pie dough all the way around the pie, first angling right and then again angling left, until the dough is completely covered. If the dough becomes uneven around the edges of the pie after you have completed the chevron pattern, refrigerate the crust after you have completed the chevron pattern, then use a sharp knife to cut away the extra dough, holding it flush to the edge of the pie as you cut

Linda Xiao captured this image. Forks aren’t the only utensil that may aid in the creation of a pleasing edge. Easy to make, this simple scallop looks wonderful on hand pies and is quick to prepare. When different spoons are pushed into the pie, they will have distinct appearances: Spoons with rounder edges will have a swoopier appearance, whereas spoons with pointier edges will have a sharper appearance. Please spoon me. Linda Xiao captured this image.

  1. From the outside of the pie, push the edge of a floured spoon into the dough, near to the inside edge of the pie plate’s edge, starting at the outer edge of the pie. Continue this process all the way around the pie. The spoon should be pressed back into the dough, this time immediately below the imprints you produced the previous time, creating two little scallop shapes. If the dough becomes uneven around the sides of the pie, cool the crust before using a paring knife to cut away the extra dough, keeping it flush to the edge of the pie while you cut

Linda Xiao captured this image. Although it’s often used forchess and other custard pies, this quirky old-school border looks fantastic on a variety of desserts. Having a reliable pair of scissors (one of my favorite tools for all pies!) on hand will be essential to achieving the desired result! Although you can successfully complete the edge before filling the pie, I personally find it easier to fill the pie first and then finish the edge. Linda Xiao captured this image.

  1. Linda Xiao captured this photograph. Traditionally used forchess and other custard pies, this is a lovely old-school border that looks fantastic on a variety of desserts. If you want to get this appearance, you’ll need a reliable pair of scissors (one of my favorite tools for any pie!) on hand. Even while you can successfully complete the edge before filling the pie, I personally find it easier to fill the pie first and then finish the edge. Linda Xiao captured this photograph.

1.Black Bottom Cherry “Sunflower” Pie

This recipe for flowering fruit pie will transport you to the middle of a sunflower field. Using a leaf cookie cutter, cut out little and big pie petals and put them on top of the chocolate-cherry filling to make a flower arrangement.

2.Fresh Blueberry Pie

We can get a little obsessed with pie crust designs that are completely out of this world. Simple, on the other hand, might be alluring! Rather than using two crusts, this “open-faced” blueberry pie recipe uses a single crust shell with a characteristic finger-crimped edge.

3.Deep-Dish Cherry Pie

Because it’s produced in a springform pan rather than a traditional pie dish, this stunning pie crust design is raised to a new level of sophistication.

The result is more filling than you’ve ever had in a pie crust design.

4.Peach, Cherry, and Mint Pie

There is nothing wrong with a lattice topping. Furthermore, it gives ample covering for crust lovers, in addition to being visually appealing. Despite this, the peach and cherry filling bursts through the seams, providing readers with a glimpse of what’s on the other side.

5.Triple Berry “Rose” Pie

A rose by any other name would smell as lovely as this berry pie, which is made with strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries and served warm. Erin’s single-crust pie dough recipe may be used to create a gorgeous floral crust on top of the pie. Her advice is to keep the pie dough as cold as possible so that it may be easily shaped into whatever form you like.

6.Concord Grape Galette

This berry pie, which contains strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries, would smell as good if it had a different name. Make a gorgeous floral crust on top of your pie using Erin’s single-crust pie dough recipe. Her advice is to keep the pie dough as cold as possible so that it may be easily shaped into whatever form you like.

7.Peach Butter Slab “Hydrangea” Pie

In the words of recipe maker Erin Jeanne McDowell, “Clusters of baked little ‘flowers’ produced from pie crust not only make it attractive, but they also offer a lovely crunch without the trouble of a double crust.”

8.Cranberry Pithivier

Score the puff pastry with a paring knife in the shape of a decorative design of your choice. The pattern will be more subdued, and the pastry will be equally golden brown over the entire piece.

9.Epic Single Crust Apple Pie

This all-American apple pie has a single layer of bottom crust, but that’s because the filling is unlike any other apple pie we’ve ever had before. Erin arranges apple slices dusted with cinnamon and sugar in the shape of a rose before baking it for a show-stopping dessert.

10.Honey Pistachio Pie With Saffron Meringue Dahlia

It’s a freeform pie made with puff pastry as the basis, so it doesn’t need to be baked in a pie dish.” This recipe calls for only a few ingredients and is not too sweet, which makes the asaffronmeringue the ideal finishing touch,” adds Erin. What is your favorite crimp to use? (And what’s the first pie you’re going to make with it this season?) Tell us about it in the comments section. This post was first published in June 2016, but because fancy pies never go out of style, we’re republishing it here for your reading pleasure.

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