What Type Of Dessert Is A Whoopie Pie

Whoopie pie – Wikipedia

Whoopie pie

Alternative names Black moon, gob, black-and-white, bob, BFO, Big Fat Oreo
Type Cookie,pie,sandwich, orcake
Place of origin United States
Region or state Maine,Pennsylvania
Main ingredients Cake (usually chocolate);icingorMarshmallow creme

Course:Dessert Cuisine:American Choco-Pecan Pie, Pecan Pie, Pecan Pie Recipe are some of the terms used to describe these desserts.

History

Despite the fact that they are regarded a New England classic and a Pennsylvania Amish institution, they are increasingly being marketed around the country. It is Maine’s official state treat to serve whoopie pies to visitors (not to be confused with the official state dessert, which isblueberry pie). The Dutch Maid Bakery in Johnstown has registered a trademark for the gob. Tim Yost, the company’s founder, purchased the rights to the brand and the technique in 1980. The world’s largest whoopie pie, weighing 1,062 lb, was constructed on March 26, 2011, in South Portland, Maine, by a group of volunteers (481.7 kg).

Weight of the previous record holder, who was from Pennsylvania, was about 200 lbs (90.7 kg).

Over 7,500 people attended the festival in its first year in 2014.

Bakers from around the state of Maine compete for the title of best whoopie pie in a variety of categories.

Origin controversy

There are several states that claim to be the birthplace of the whoopie pie, including Pennsylvania, Maine, Massachusetts, Virginia, and New Hampshire. According to the Pennsylvania Dutch Convention and Visitors Bureau, the whoopie pie recipe is derived from the Amish and Pennsylvania German cultures of the region, whose beginnings are unlikely to have left a formal paper trail, and has been passed down through generations of family members. Since 1925, Labadie’s Bakery in Lewiston, Maine, has been producing the dessert.

  • Diverse theories contend that the whoopie pie began in Massachusetts and moved both north and south, or that German immigrants in Pennsylvania introduced a progenitor to the whoopie pie to villages all throughout the northeast.
  • The handbook, The Yummy Book, contains a recipe for Marshmallow Fluff that was made popular by the Amish.
  • In 2011, the Maine State Legislature debated making the whoopie pie the official state pie, but ultimately decided against it.
  • The actual title of L.D.

It was ultimately agreed that the whoopie pie would be named the official state treat, with Maine’s signature dessert, blueberry pie (made with wild Maine blueberries), being designated as the official state dessert.

See also

  • Dorayaki, macaron, monaka, moon pie, and sandwich cookie are all examples of Japanese desserts.

References

  1. Massachusetts is a state in the United States (1835). Annual Report of the State of Massachusetts Infirmary.3. p. 92. Annual Report of the State of Massachusetts Infirmary. Obtainable on November 2, 2013
  2. Ab Mcheline and Maynard (March 17, 2009). “Whoopie! Whether it’s a cookie, pie, or cake, it’s having a moment.” The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City. Obtainable on March 18, 2009
  3. Linda Stradley is a writer and editor (May 2, 2015). “Whoopie Pie History and Recipe, What’s Cooking America” is the title of the article. Whatscookingamerica.net. Associated Press (ABC) retrieved on July 19, 2018
  4. (April 21, 2011). According to the legislation, whoopie pie is an official “treat.” The Portland Press Herald is a newspaper published in Portland, Oregon. Obtainable on April 21, 2011
  5. “The Gobs trademark is owned by the Johnstown Bakery.” The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette published this article. Obtainable on July 19, 2018
  6. Abc “Maine produces a Whoopie Pie weighing 1,062 pounds.” WHDH-TV, broadcasted on March 28, 2011. Obtainable on April 21, 2011
  7. Dan Sharrow wrote on July 2, 2014, “Over 7,500 People Celebrate the Maine Whoopie Pie Festival”, which can be found at mainewhoopiepiefestival.com. Retrieved on June 7, 2015
  8. Stapleton, Erica (June 27, 2014). “Bakers Prepare for Upcoming Whoopie Pie Festival in Dover-Foxcroft”. The Dover-Foxcroft Journal. WABI. The original version of this article was published on June 14, 2015. Retrieved on June 7, 2015
  9. “Save Our Whoopie.” PAdutchcountry.com. According to Pompilio, Natalie (February 16, 2011), “Whoopie pies: Maine treat or Lancaster County delight?” was published in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Retrieved March 2, 2011
  10. “Battle Brewing Over ‘Whoopie Pies'” was published in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. WMTW.com (Portland, Maine) published a story on February 15, 2011. The original version of this article was published on February 20, 2011. Obtainable on March 2, 2011
  11. Stoneback, Diane W. “Which state is credited with inventing the whoopie pie?” mcall.com, The Tribune Company, 2007. abGorsegner, Michael (February 18, 2011). “Pennsylvanians unhappy about Maine’s claim to Whoopie Pie origin”. The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved August 25, 2014. East Lampeter Township is located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, according to Fox43.com. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011
  12. “Whoopie Pie, Whoopie Pie Recipe, Gob History, How To Make Whoopie Pies, Whoopie Pie History”
  13. “Whoopie Pie, Whoopie Pie Recipe, Gob History, How To Make Whoopie Pies, Whoopie Pie History”. Originally published on WhatsCookingAmerica.net on March 12, 2009. Whoopie Pie History and Recipe, Gob History, How To Make Whoopie Pies, Whats Cooking America, Whats Cooking America, Whats Cooking America, Whats Cooking America, Whats Cooking America. COVER, Susan M. (January 18, 2011). “Maine legislators sweet on whoopie pies.” Retrieved June 3, 2016. The Portland Press Herald is a newspaper published in Portland, Oregon. Augusta, Maine is a city in the United States. Obtainable on March 5, 2016

Whoopie Pies

Perfectly chocolaty, incredibly soft and fluffy, and packed with a scrumptious marshmallow fluff whoopie pie filling, these are the ultimateWhoopie Pies. These delectable cake-like cookies literally melt away in your mouth with every mouthful you take! Do you have a weakness for chocolate? If so, tell us about it. Besides that, make my favoriteChocolate Cake, this irresistibleEdible Chocolate Cookie Dough (which comes in two other flavor options), and my go-toBrownies recipes. After all, February is National Chocolate Lovers Month, so we should take advantage of the occasion.

  • However, the most popular chocolate cookie recipe you’ll discover online appears to be a butter-based cookie with chocolate chips.
  • As a result, I use a recipe that is based on vegetable oil and water, much like a classic chocolate cake, which is what these cookies are modeled after.
  • As a result, I use store-bought marshmallow fluff and butter to enhance the flavor and texture of the filling rather than making it from scratch.
  • Of course, chocolate cake, or something comparable to a Ding Dong, but a hundred times better, would be the best choice.
  • These sandwich cookies are so delicious and simple to make that you’ll receive requests for them over and over again!

Ingredients Needed for Chocolate Whoopie Pies and Filling (Plus Substitutes)

  • In this recipe, I prefer using unbleached all-purpose flour, although regular bleached all-purpose flour would do just fine. To make the best-tasting cookies, use unsweetened cocoa powder made from high-quality cocoa. Baking soda– this aids in the rising of the cookies. Make sure to use baking soda that has not expired in order to guarantee that it functions effectively. Adding salt will help prevent the cookies from tasting flat, so don’t forget about it. Light brown sugar– if you’re in a hurry, you can manufacture brown sugar from scratch. To make it, measure out 1 cup white sugar, delete 1 tablespoon and replace it with 1 tablespoon molasses, and combine thoroughly. Buttermilk– what if you don’t have any on hand? It is possible to make your own by combining 1/2 cup milk with 1 1/2 teaspoons vinegar or lemon juice. Take a 5-minute break
  • Vegetable oil (canola oil will also work) is recommended. In this recipe, the egg is used to help bind the ingredients together, however if you have an egg allergy, you may use one of these substitutes: Vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste (in equal amounts) can be substituted for the vanilla extract. Water that is merely hot from the faucet is good
  • There is no need to heat it.

For the filling you’ll also need:

  • In order to balance out the richness of the filling, I use butter in both unsalted and salted forms. I dislike adding salt separately since it does not dissolve well
  • Marshmallow fluff (also known as marshmallow creme)– if you choose, you can omit the filling recipe entirely and substitute homemade marshmallow fluff instead. With the addition of powdered sugar, the filling is both sweetened and thickened. Unfortunately, because of the ultra fine, powdery texture of powdered sugar (also known as confectioners sugar), there aren’t many good replacements for it in frosting and fillings of this nature.

How to Make Whoopie Pies

  • Prepare the oven and baking sheets as follows: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees with the racks in the top and lower thirds of the oven set over them. Prepare 18 13-inch baking pans by lining them with parchment paper and setting them aside. Dry ingredients should be whisked together: In a large mixing basin, combine the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt
  • Set aside. Combine the wet ingredients: Use an electric hand mixer or the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment to thoroughly incorporate the ingredients in a large mixing bowl until they are well combined. Combine the wet and dry ingredients: Just until incorporated, add the flour mixture, followed by the hot water and mixing just until combined
  • Drop the batter onto the baking sheets that have been prepared as follows: Use a medium cookie scoop or 1 1/2 tablespoons at a time to scoop out batter and put onto prepared baking sheets, spacing 2-inches apart
  • Preheat the oven to 350°F. Bake until set: Preparation: Bake the first two sheets at a time, flipping sheets midway through baking time, until cookies bounce back when touched or a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean, about 8–10 minutes total. To cool entirely, allow the cake to cool for approximately 5 minutes before transferring it to a wire rack to cool completely. Bake the last sheet of cookies in the center of the oven for 8–10 minutes, or until golden brown.

How to Make Whoopie Pie Filling

  • Preparation of the oven and baking sheets includes the following steps. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees with racks in the top and bottom thirds of the oven. Prepare 18 13-inch baking pans by lining them with parchment paper and setting them apart. Ingredients for the dry mix: flour, chocolate powder, baking soda, and salt should be whisked together in a large mixing dish Wet components should be mixed together as follows:. Use an electric hand mixer or the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment to thoroughly incorporate the ingredients in a large mixing bowl until they are well combined
  • Using a blender, combine wet and dry ingredients: Just until incorporated, add the flour mixture, followed by the hot water and mixing just until blended again. In a large mixing bowl, combine all of the ingredients. Use a medium cookie scoop or 1 1/2 tablespoons at a time to scoop out batter and set onto prepared baking sheets, spacing them 2 inches apart. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Preparation: Bake the first two sheets at a time, flipping sheets midway through baking time, until cookies bounce back when touched or a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean, about 8–10 minutes total
  • Allow for around 5 minutes of cooling time before transferring to a wire rack to cool entirely (see note below). Baking time for the last sheet of cookies is around 8–10 minutes in the center of the oven

How to Store Whoopie Pies

  • Keep them in an airtight container on parchment paper (I prefer to store them on a baking sheet with a lid)
  • Maintain freshness in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Allow about 30 minutes at room temperature before serving to allow the filling and cookies to soften a little.

Tips for the Best Whoopie Pies

  • If you want a light and airy texture, avoid over-mixing the batter. The same may be said for the filler. If the cocoa is lumpy here, as it will be in most cases when baking, sift it before using it
  • Using your hands, break up any clumps of brown sugar that may have formed before using it. Additionally, you might want to think about investing in one of those clay brown sugar disks to help keep it wet. Refrigerate the filling for a few minutes before piping it into the cookies
  • Otherwise, it will become runny. Refrigeration aids in re-firming the butter, resulting in a filling that is slightly stiffer. Keep cookies out of the sun during the summer months
  • They are not the type of cookie you want to offer at an outdoor lunch gathering unless it is served from a cooler. No stacking, only a single layer of storage. Because they’re damp, they’ll begin to cling together, and the filling will become flattened and flow out the edges if you don’t do this.

Possible Variations

  • If you want even more taste, use Dutch cocoa. Alternatively, you may make a basic egg white whoopie pie filling at your leisure (but avoid offering to the elderly, children, and pregnant women). Make a variety of fillings with different flavors like as cream cheese, caramel, coconut, chocolate, or peanut butter. Alternatively, flavor the filling mixture with a small amount of extract, such as coconut extract. Instead, use sweetened whipped cream to fill the cavity. 1 teaspoon instant espresso powder should be added to the batter. If you want a filling that is less prone to running, use buttercream icing, half a batch of vanilla buttercream or half a recipe of chocolate buttercream When making peppermint whoopie pies, add a few drops of peppermint essence to the batter or filling and roll the edges of the filling in finely crushed candy canes for a festive holiday treat.

More Delicious Sandwich Style Cookies to Try

  • If you want an even fuller flavor, use Dutch cocoa. Alternatively, you may make a classic egg white whoopie pie filling at your leisure (but avoid offering to the elderly, children, and pregnant women)
  • Fillings with varied flavors, such as cream cheese, caramel, coconut, chocolate, or peanut butter, can be substituted. It’s also possible to flavor the filling mixture with a few drops of extract, such as coconut extract. instead, use sweetened whipped cream
  • Into the batter, stir in 1 teaspoon of instant espresso powder. In order to make a filling that is less prone to running, make half a batch of vanilla buttercream or half a batch of chocolate buttercream. When making peppermint whoopie pies, add a few drops of peppermint essence to the batter or filling and roll the edges of the filling in finely crushed candy canes to make a festive treat for the holidays.

Whoopie Pies

A decadent marshmallow cream whoopie pie filling is layered between two layers of deliciously chocolaty, incredibly soft and fluffy whoopie pie dough. These delectable cake-like cookies literally melt away in your mouth with every mouthful you take! Servings:17 Prep30minutes Cook18minutes Prepared in 48 minutes or less

Cookies

  • 2 cups (283g) unbleached all-purpose flour* (scoop and level to measure)
  • 1/2 cup (45g) unsweetened cocoa powder (scoop and level to measure)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup packed (200g) light brown brown sugar, breaking up any clumps
  • 2 cups (283g) unbleached all-purpose flour* (scoop and level to measure)
  • 2 cups (283g) unbleached all-purpose flour* (scoop A mixture of 1 giant egg, 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract, 1/2 cup (120 mL) boiling water, and 1/2 cup (120 mL) buttermilk are combined to make this recipe.

Filling

  • At room temperature
  • 8 tablespoons (113 g) salted butter
  • 6 tablespoons (85 g) unsalted butter at room temperature 2 1/4 cups (270 grams) powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 10 ounces marshmallow fluff (also known as marshmallow creme, which equals about one and a half 7-ounce jars)
  • 1 teaspoon cocoa powder
  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and arrange oven racks in the top and lower thirds of the oven. Prepare 18 13-inch baking pans by lining them with parchment paper and setting them aside. Whisk together the flour, chocolate powder, baking soda, and salt in a medium mixing basin until well combined. To make the cake, in a large mixing bowl, using an electric hand mixer or the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the brown sugar, buttermilk, vegetable oil, egg, and vanilla extract until thoroughly combined
  • Set aside. Just until incorporated, add the flour mixture, followed by the hot water and mixing just until combined
  • Use a medium cookie scoop or 1 1/2 tablespoons at a time to scoop out batter and put onto prepared baking sheets, spacing 2-inches apart
  • Bake the first two sheets at a time, rotating the sheets midway through baking, until the cookies spring back when touched or a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean, about 8 – 10 minutes total
  • Cool completely on a wire rack. Allow for around 5 minutes of cooling time before transferring to a wire rack to cool entirely, if desired. The last sheet of cookies should be baked for around 8 – 10 minutes, in the center of the oven.

For the filling

  • On a low speed, cream together the salted butter, unsalted butter, and powdered sugar in the bowl of an electric stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or with a hand mixer) until thoroughly incorporated
  • Increase the mixer speed to high and beat for about 4 minutes, or until the mixture is light and fluffy. Blend in the vanilla extract. Toss the bowl with the marshmallow fluff and fold together with a rubber spatula just until incorporated
  • Remove bowl from stand mixer
  • Refrigerate the mixture for about 20 minutes to thicken it up before folding it again. Transfer to a piping bag equipped with a big round tip and pipe over half of the cookies, sandwiching a second biscuit over the top of the first cookie. Cookies can be stored in an airtight container on parchment paper, in a single layer, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days after baking. Allow for roughly 30 minutes of resting time at room temperature before serving.
  • One or two reviewers have expressed concern about the batter being excessively runny. Make certain that you are measuring the flour and cocoa correctly
  • The flour should be scooped directly from the box and leveled off, not spooned and leveled off (or better yet use a scale). If you are concerned, simply add an additional 1/4 cup flour to make a thicker dough
  • Otherwise, proceed as directed.

Variations that might be used:

  • Make the chocolate more richer by using Dutch cocoa
  • Experiment with other flavors of filling such as cream cheese, caramel, coconut, chocolate, or peanut butter. Alternatively, flavor the filling mixture with a small amount of extract, such as coconut extract. Instead, use sweetened whipped cream to fill the cavity. 1 teaspoon instant espresso powder should be added to the batter. If you want a filling that is less prone to running, use buttercream icing, half a batch of vanilla buttercream or half a recipe of chocolate buttercream When making peppermint whoopie pies, add a few drops of peppermint essence to the batter or filling and roll the edges of the filling in finely crushed candy canes for a festive holiday treat.

Nutritional Values Whoopie PiesAmount Per ServingCalories383Calories from Fat 162 percent Daily Value*Fat18g28 percent Saturated Fat 12g75 percent Fat18g28 percent Saturated Fat 12g75 percent Amount of cholesterol: 39mg13 percent of the total sodium intake: 200mg Potassium is 9 percent (88mg). carbohydrate 56 g 19 % protein 3 % 14% of the diet is made up of fiber Sugar content is 38g42 percent. Protein2g4 as a percentage Vitamin A334 IU (International Units) Calcium (28mg) at 7 percent 1 gram of iron1 gram of magnesium6 % A 2000-calorie diet is used to calculate the percent Daily Values (%DV).

The Best Whoopie Pies (With 3 Optional Fillings)

This is a traditional and simple whoopie pie recipe that anybody can make.

Chocolate round cakes are sandwiched together with a sweet, creamy, and fluffy filling to create this delicious dessert.

What is Whoopie Pie?

A whoopie pie is best described as a little chocolate cake sandwich in cookie shape, which is the most accurate description. Two rounds of chocolate cake with a creamy filling or frosting sandwiched between them are the basic components of this dessert. It is customary to utilize marshmallow filling, however several types of buttercream are also commonly used. Chocolate is the original and most often used flavor of whoopie pies, however you may now get various tastes such as pumpkin or vanilla in addition to chocolate.

Whoopie pies have a flavor that is similar to a particularly delicious frosted chocolate cake.

Whoopie Pie Origin

What is known as whoppie pie is a New England favorite that originated as a Pennsylvania Amish tradition. It is also one of Maine’s most beloved foods. These days, they are generally available for purchase throughout the United States as well as other parts of the world. Whoopie pies have been available for purchase since 1925, which only goes to demonstrate how delicious they are; otherwise, they would not have lasted so long.

How to Make The Best Homemade Whoopie Pie

The basic, traditional whoopie pie recipe is my favorite, and I’ve experimented with a number of other variations on the theme. Because there is a lot of cocoa powder in it, it is extremely chocolaty, and it is so soft that it will practically melt in your mouth when you bite into it. Making the cakes involves creaming butter and sugar together, then adding eggs, vanilla and buttermilk, followed by dry components such as flour and cocoa powder, until the batter is smooth and fluffy. Because there is enough baking soda to create lift and enough flour to keep the batter together, the dough will be rather sticky and soft when it is baked, but it will not spread much during baking.

It’s less cluttered, and it makes life a little easier.

It’s a nice standard size, and I use it for the most majority of my cookie projects.

Cocoa Powder: Both unsweetened natural cocoa powder and Dutch-process cocoa powder work nicely in this recipe, so use whichever you like (I prefer the latter).

Whoopie Pie Filling: Choose Your Favorite

Right? You’re aware of my need for everything to be flawless, right? In order to satisfy my craving for variety, I’m providing you with four different filling options to select from. In this recipe, the marshmallow filling is a classic, and it’s made simple by using a marshmallow cream such as Marshmallow Fluff (which you can find at your local grocery store). For those who do not have this item on hand or who prefer a different filling, I have three more possibilities for you to consider.

That is not intended to be confusing; rather, it is intended to be helpful. Toutes of them are delectable and are commonly found in traditional chocolate whoopie pie recipes.

  • Simple and straightforward, this traditional vanilla buttercream frosting is simple and straightforward to create. This dish is one of my favorites since it is not excessively sweet when compared to other recipes
  • Cream cheese frosting– I prefer cream cheese frosting over standard buttercream frosting most of the time, but that’s just me. Vanilla bean frosting– Vanilla bean frosting is a favorite of mine. I believe it is an excellent pairing with chocolate whoopie pies
  • You should absolutely attempt Swiss meringue buttercream if you have the ability to do it
  • Else, you should pass on it. I love the flavor and texture of this filling, and it’s quite close to the conventional marshmallow filling found in whoopie pies and other desserts. The amount of this recipe is just half as much as it appears on the label (or perhaps even less
  • Just lick the rest of it straight off the bowl)

:30mins:12mins:42mins 12 whoopie pies will be produced. More filling options may be found in the previous post. Cakes:

  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick/115g) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 1 cup (200g) granulated sugar (or brown sugar)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 cup (240 mL) buttermilk
  • 1 cup (240

Filling with Marshmallows (or choose another filling, read above post)

  • 2 cups Marshmallow Fluff
  • 1 cup (115 g/4 oz.) powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick/115g) unsalted butter, warmed to room temperature
  1. Make the cakes in the following ways: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit/180 degrees Celsius. Combine the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Make a mental note to put it away. Prepare two baking pans by lining them with parchment paper. The butter and sugar should be creamed together until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes, in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix in the egg, vanilla, and buttermilk until well blended, then add the other ingredients. Slowly incorporate the dry components into the wet ingredients, mixing only until incorporated. Scoop mounds of batter (1 and 1/2 tablespoons in size) onto prepared baking sheets, spreading them 2-3 inches apart. (I use this ice cream scoop.) Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until the tops of the muffins spring back when lightly pressed. Allow to cool fully on a wire rack before serving. Prepare the filling by doing the following: Combine all of the ingredients in a large mixing bowl and beat with an electric mixer until smooth and creamy. If the filling is too hard, a little heavy cream or milk can be added to soften it. Assemble the cookies as follows: Half of the cookies should have the filling spread on the flat side. Continue to sandwich with the remaining cookies, pushing down slightly so that the filling extends to the edges of the cookies
  2. And Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week. Keep the dish at room temperature.

Classic Whoopie Pies

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Classic Whoopie Pies ~ Chocolate cake-like batter is baked into large, soft hamburger-sized, bun shaped cookies then filled with a fluffy, sweet marshmallow frosting.

I’ll never forget the first time I had a traditional Whoopie Pie, which happened to be in Portland, Maine, while on business. It had been asked by my co-workers that I bring back Whoopie Pies for them to enjoy, and because this was back in the days when airline travel was so tough, I brought a large box of Whoopie Pies home with me on the plane. I must say that I was taken aback when I realized how large they were; they were nearly too large to carry in one hand! I’m all in for a soft chocolate cake that can be eaten with your fingers.

The name ‘Whoopie Pies’ may have come from the original recipients who got so exited when presented with this sweet treat, that they yelled whoopie!Or so the legend goes

In the early twentieth century, the Whoopie Pie was born, having its origins in Pennsylvania Dutch country as well as the coastal Maine region of the United States. Because these are more like cake or cream filled cookies, I am baffled as to why these are referred to as “pies.” In the same way as Boston Cream Pie is referred to as a pie, but is actually more of a cake, so is Boston Cream Pie. It’s all very perplexing! Rather of the lard-laden original, this revised recipe uses butter, marshmallow fluff, and powdered sugar to create a sweet, fluffy filling that I find far more attractive than the original.

Additionally, the use of butter in the frosting aids in the setting-up of the fluffy filling once cold, making it a bit less messy to eat.

Did I mention that these Classic Whoopie Pies freeze beautifully?

They’re actually pretty tasty when served slightly chilled. I like to keep these refrigerated because it prevents the icing from leaking out the edges when you take a huge mouthful! However, other people may find the oozing to be their favorite part, so I’ll leave it up to you all to decide whether or not to ooze.

Food is memories indeed!

We asked comments from our serious, committed taste-testers for this dish, as we did with all of our recipes. It would be an understatement to say that their response was overwhelmingly positive. My husband brought some to work with him as well, and several coworkers from the northeast reminisced about how much they enjoyed good Classic Whoopie Pies when they were younger. However, everyone agreed that these Whoopie Pies were much better than the recollections they had of their childhood. This is a high compliment, to say the least.

What’s the best part?

Thanks for PINNING!

  • In this modernized classic, a chocolate cake-like batter is cooked into huge, soft hamburger-sized bun shaped cookies, which are then filled with a fluffy, sweet marshmallow frosting before being baked again.

For the cakes:

  • A mixture of 2 cups all-purpose flour, 12 cup Dutch-processed cocoa powder, one teaspoon baking soda, one teaspoon salt, one cup light brown sugar, packed
  • Eight tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • One large egg, room temperature, one teaspoon vanilla, one cup buttermilk
  • One-fourth teaspoon instant espresso powder/granules

For the filling:

  • 16 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 12 teaspoon pure vanilla essence
  • A pinch of salt
  • 2 (scant) cups cocoa powder Marshmallow Fluff (also known as marshmallow fluff)

To make the cakes:

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Prepare 2 baking sheets by lining them with parchment paper and setting them aside
  • A medium mixing bowl is the best place to start. Whisk together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt until smooth. Set aside
  • In a large mixing basin, whisk together the brown sugar and butter until well combined. Using an electric mixer, whip the mixture until it is light and fluffy. Mix in the egg just until it is fully absorbed. Slowly add the vanilla extract to the batter while mixing on low speed until it is well integrated. Remove the mixture from the mixing bowl’s bottom and sides with a rubber spatula and blend for another 20-30 seconds
  • In a 2-cup measuring cup, combine the buttermilk and espresso powder
  • Using a low-speed mixer, add one-third of the flour combination, then half of the buttermilk mixture to the creamed butter, sugar, and eggs
  • Repeat the process with the remaining flour mixture. Repeat the process, adding one-third of the flour at a time, followed by the remaining buttermilk. Finally, add in the remaining flour and blend for another minute, scraping down the sides as needed. Scoop the batter into a 13-cup measuring cup and set it in a mound on a baking sheet coated with parchment paper. Using the same method as before, add 5 more mounds to the first pan (for a total of 6 mounds each pan), making sure they are spaced approximately 3-inches apart. Bake for 16 minutes, turning the pan once during the baking time, or until the cakes bounce back when lightly pushed, whichever comes first. While the first pan is baking, prepare the second pan by mounding six additional 13-cup scoops of batter onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake for another 15 minutes. The second layer of cakes should be baked and then allowed to cool on the paper for at least 1 hour.

To make the filling:

  • A medium mixing dish should have the butter and powdered sugar combined
  • Using an electric mixer, cream together until frothy. Add the vanilla and salt and incorporate well. For around 2 minutes, beat in the Marshmallow Fluff until well mixed. Set aside to harden up in the refrigerator for 45-60 minutes after scraping it into a big ziplock bag or piping bag. Using a pastry bag, pipe the frosting onto the middle of the flat sides of 6 cakes in a uniform layer. The flat side of the remaining 6 cakes should be placed on top of the filling and gently pressed until the filling spreads outward to the corners of the cake. Serve immediately or store in the refrigerator for up to 3 days in an airtight container.

From Cook’s Country Magazine, June/July 2006, with permission.

Do you love Whoopie Pies?

You’ll love our recipe for Gingerbread Whoopie Pies, which is wonderful for the holidays. Be sure to pin it for future reference. A Hot and Spicy Take on Things A great recipe for Lemon Blueberry Whoopie Pies has been uploaded, and I can’t wait to test it out. Red Velvet Cake is one of my all-time favorite desserts in the entire world, so it goes without saying that I will be trying theseRed Velvet Brownie Whoopie PiesfromSugary Sweets. Finally, this innovative and stunning variation of Lemon Meringue Whoopie PiesfromLemons for Lulu is one of my favorites!

I hope you were able to find a few that you would want to try as well. It’s our desire that you have a lovely weekend filled with beautiful weather. This weekend, we’ll be cleaning up the grill and setting up the patio umbrella! Yeah, that’s right. Thank you for taking the time to visit! Tricia

Whoopie Pie History and Recipe

In addition to being a New England phenomenon, whoopie pies are also regarded to be a Pennsylvania Amish custom. These individuals have also been referred to as “gobs” in Western Pennsylvania (see Gob History below). They are one of the most well-known and well-loved comfort meals in Maine. People from Maine even allege that whoopie pies were used to wean them off their mothers’ breasts. Because they are so generously proportioned, these sweets are more like a cake in Maine than they are like a pie or a cookie elsewhere (about hamburger size).

Additionally, when eating a Whoopie Pie, a large glass of milk is nearly always required.

New England Whoopie Pies – Amish Whoopie Pies – Gob History:

A whoopie pie is similar to a sandwich, however it is created with two soft cookies and a fluffy white filling instead of one large cookie. Vegetable shortening, rather of butter, is used in the traditional recipe. Chocolate whoopie pies are the original and most widely produced whoopie pies. Cooks, on the other hand, like to experiment, and pumpkin whoopie pies have become a popular seasonal variety. When it comes to whoopie pies, the Amish are responsible for the creation of the dish, and in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, it is not unusual to see roadside farm booths selling the treat.

  • The fact that these cake-like whoopie pies were initially produced from leftover batter meant that they were thought to be a special occasion delicacy.
  • When their bakery first opened its doors in 1925, they began serving Whoopie Pies to the public.
  • Since at least 1931, the Berwick Cake Company in Roxbury, Massachusetts, has also been producing “Whoopee pies.” Some believe that Berwick’s pies have been around since 1927.
  • The answer to the issue of how the Amish dessert became so famous in New England is likely to be found in a 1930s cookbook calledYummy Bookby the Durkee Mower Company, which manufactured Marshmallow Fluff and was published by the Durkee Mower Company.
  • In fact, according to the Marshmallow Fluff website, the company’s beginnings may be traced back to 1917.
  • By the time the war was finished, Mr Query had found other employment and had no interest in resuming his firm; nonetheless, he was eager to sell the formula to the highest bidder.
  • After returning from a trip to France, they decided to rebrand their product “Toot Sweet Marshmallow Fluff,” however the term “Toot Sweet” didn’t last long on the label of the product.

An early receipt, which is still preserved in the company’s scrapbooks, details the sale of three one-gallon cans to a holiday resort in New Hampshire in April of 1920.

With the help of local housewives, the door to door business acquired a reputation, which eventually led to Fluff being sold in local grocery stores.

After sponsoring the weekly ” Flufferettes ” radio program on the Yankee radio network in 1930, which consisted of twenty-one stations transmitting to the whole New England region, Durkee-Mower established itself as a pioneer in the field of radio advertising.

Up until the late 1940s, the show was still running.

The Book-of-the-Moment was first unveiled in the previous episode.

Since then, the book has been revised several times, and the most recent edition is thirty-two pages in length, according to the publisher.

Gob History:

In western Pennsylvania, namely the Johnstown region, they appear to be referred to as “gob” solely in some circles. When the dessert was first made, it was reported to have been devised by the bakers of the now-defunct HarrisBoyar Bakery in Morrellville, Pennsylvania. It’s likely that they modified what was already a regional staple, which was influenced by the cream-filled whoopie pies of Pennsylvania Dutch country, which is located in the state’s easternmost district. An article published in the Johnstown Tribune-Democrat newspaper, Johnstown’s Gob – A lunchtime tradition, on March 12, 2009, said that the following: It has been determined via study that the Gob’s origins may be traced to medieval Germany, according to Susan Kalcik, a folklorist and archivist at the Southwestern Pennsylvania Heritage Preservation Commission in Johnstown, Pennsylvania.

  1. She says they are made by the Amish near Lancaster, and she has seen them as far south as Virginia.
  2. As well as in New England and as far afield as Hawaii, I’ve come across Whoopee Pies.” According to Kalcik, the Gob became popular because it was portable and could be carried in a lunch bucket.
  3. “The dessert was given its name by these hardworking individuals.” However, not just anybody may use the name “Gob” for the well-known icing-filled pastries, according to the law.
  4. Cost, who purchased the rights to the cake from HarrisBoyar Bakery in Morrellville, said he’s had a fascination for the dessert since childhood.
  5. The Maine State Legislature contemplated declaring the Whoopie Pie the official dessert of the state in 2011, but ultimately decided against it.

Whoopie Pie Recipes – How To Make Whoopie Pies

There appears to be a significant difference in recipes for New England Whoopie Pie and Amish Whoopie Pie in that the New England version makes use of commercial Marshmallow Fluff/Creme, whilst the Amish version does not. Aside from that, most recipes are essentially the same. I’ve also included a recipe that calls for cake mix.

New England Whoopie Pie Recipe:

half-cup solid vegetable shortening (optional) 1 cup brown sugar that has been tightly packed 1egg a quarter cup unsweetened cocoa 2 cups all-purpose flour (optional) 1 teaspoon baking powder (optional) 1 teaspoon baking soda (optional) 1 teaspoon of table salt pure vanilla extract (around 1 teaspoon) 1 gallon of milk Filling for Whoopie Pies (see recipe below) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

  1. Prepare baking sheets by lightly greasing them. In a large mixing bowl, cream together the shortening, sugar, and egg until light and fluffy.
  2. In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the milk and vanilla essence.
  3. Drop the batter by the 1/4 cup (to create 18 cakes) onto the baking sheets that have been prepared.
  4. Bake for 15 minutes, or until the cookies are firm to the touch, whichever comes first.
  5. Prepare the Whoopie Pie Filling (see recipes below).
  6. Place another cake on top, gently pushing down to ensure that the filling is distributed evenly.
  7. Allow the final Whoopie Pies to cool fully before packaging them.

Wrap each Whoopie Pie individually in plastic wrap before freezing. Pack them loosely in a plastic freezer container and cover with plastic wrap. To prepare the whoopie pies for serving, thaw them in the refrigerator overnight. This recipe makes 9 big Whoopie Pies.

Whoopie Pie Filling 1:

It is possible that some individuals will choose to use the Marshmallow Fluff straight from the jar, rather than producing the filling described below. It’s all up to you. sugar*1 1/2 cups confectioner’s sugar*1 cup solid vegetable shortening*1 1/2 cups powdered sugar **1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract* Butter may be replaced for all or part of the vegetable shortening, however traditional Whoopie Pies are made only with vegetable shortening** Marshmallow Creme may be substituted for the marshmallow fluff.

  • Stir in the vanilla extract until completely combined.
  • baking powder (optional) 1 teaspoon baking soda (optional) 1 teaspoon of table salt pure vanilla extract (around 1 teaspoon) 1 gallon of milk Filling for Whoopie Pies Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • In a large mixing bowl, cream together the shortening, sugar, and egg until light and fluffy.
  • In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the milk and vanilla essence.
  • Drop the batter by the 1/4 cup (to create 18 cakes) onto the baking sheets that have been prepared.
  • Bake for 15 minutes, or until the cookies are firm to the touch, whichever comes first.
  • Make the Whoopie Pie Filling according to package directions.

Place another cake on top, gently pushing down to ensure that the filling is distributed evenly.

Allow finished whoopie pies to cool fully before sealing them.

Wrap each whoopie pie individually in plastic wrap before freezing.

To prepare the whoopie pies for serving, thaw them in the refrigerator overnight.

eggs whites at room temperature (three) 2 cups light corn syrup (optional) a half teaspoon of salt 2 cups powdered sugar (confectioner’s sugar) sifted pure vanilla essence (around 1 tablespoon) Combine the egg whites, corn syrup, and salt in a large mixing bowl using an electric mixer.

On a low speed, slowly add the powdered sugar and mix until everything is properly combined.

This is the point at which your handmade marshmallow fluff/cream is ready to be used on Whoopie Pies or in other recipes. Use right away, or store in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks in a covered container. This recipe yields a considerable lot.

What Is a Whoopie Pie?

One of America’s most cherished desserts, the whoopie pie is a baked product that is made out of two cookie cakes that are mound-shaped, with a creamy marshmallow-based filling sandwiched between them. Whoopie pies are traditionally made with chocolate cakes and vanilla flavored filling, but today’s whoopie pies may be found in a variety of flavor combinations; most are sweet, but some are even savory!

Where did the whoopie pie originate?

Actually, there is quite a bit of debate over the origins of the whoopie pie and which state is credited with the invention of the dessert. Despite the fact that whoopie pies are widely recognized to be a traditional New England dish as well as a cherished ritual of the Pennsylvania Amish, no one knows for certain where the original whoopie pie was created. History of whoopie pies dates back to the early 1900s, and its origins can be traced to any one of the following US states: New Hampshire, Virginia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Maine.

  • While each state has its own “claim to fame” for the creation of the first whoopie pies on record, Maine has gone so far as to designate whoopie pies as the official state treat by the state government, and as a result, Maine appears to have the most bragging rights in the great argument.
  • There is no written evidence to support the claim, which is convenient, but Mainers are firm in their belief that the creation is theirs.
  • When the news surfaced in 2011 that a proposal to designate the whoopie pie the official state dessert of Maine had been floated, Pennsylvanians were enraged.
  • Whoopie pies, often known as “gobs” in this part of the country, are an ubiquitous sight at roadside farm stands and small bakeries around the region.

What’s the difference between a Maine whoopie pie and a Pennsylvania gob?

One of the most noticeable differences between a Maine whoopie pie and a Pennsylvania gob is that the commercial marshmallow Fluff used in the Maine version is replaced with handmade marshmallow Fluff in the Amish version, according to the experts. In 1917, according to marshmallowfluff.com (the website of the commercial maker of Marshmallow Fluff), the first batch of Marshmallow Fluff was produced. Archibald Query, a guy from Somerville, Massachusetts, was brewing the delicious concoction in his home and selling it door-to-door to customers.

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The sale of three 1-gallon cans at $1.00 per gallon was recorded in the company’s records in April of 1920.

Despite the fact that it is widely used, the term “Gobs” (as well as all of the rights to it) truly belongs to Tim Yost, the owner of Dutch Maid Bakery.

The now-defunct HarrisBoyar Bakery in Morrellville, Pennsylvania, claimed to have originated the dessert sometime in the 1920s and to have licensed the name and intellectual property rights to Yost.

Is there a whoopie pie festival?

Yes! In fact, there are two whoopie pie celebrations held each year. One such event is held at the Hershey Farm and Inn in Strasburg, Pennsylvania, and it includes a whoopie pie eating contest as well as the crowning of a whoopie pie queen as its centerpiece. The Maine Whoopie Festival is celebrated every year in the small town of Dover-Foxcroft on June 25th, which is designated as National Whoopie Pie Day. More than 8,000 people attended the Maine Whoopie Pie Festival in 2015, with over 20,000 whoopie pies being sold.

Who makes the best whoopie pies?

That’s a piece of cake! We admit that we’re a little biased, but we feel that Cape Whoopies, Maine’s Gourmet Whoopie Pie is the greatest whoopie pie available anywhere on the planet. To ensure that our Maine whoopie pies meet the highest quality standards, we utilize only the highest-quality ingredients (no shortening or Crisco), develop the most delectable flavor combinations, and send them statewide with the greatest care.

Where can I buy whoopie pies?

The best part is that you don’t even have to leave your house to get whoopie pies delivered to your door. If you prefer to buy from the comfort of your own home, you may order our gourmet whoopie pie varieties by the dozen from our whoopie pie café and whoopie pie bakery, located at 185 Cottage Road in South Portland, Maine 04106.

Whoopie Pie

Whoopie pie is regarded as a classic of the American pastry world. A large layer of marshmallow fluff is spread in the midst of two discs of cocoa biscuits, creating a very rich dessert. There are various variations, and they are all as delectable in their own way.

What is the origin of the whoopie pie?

The whoopie pie is a dessert that is extremely popular in the United States. It’s similar to a biscuit, a sandwich, a cookie, and a pie all rolled into one. It’s made up of two discs of chocolate cake biscuits that are slightly bent in the middle. Some people refer to it as BFO (Big Fat Oreo). It is also known by the term “devil dogs” in some circles. The first known reference to this cake dates back to the nineteenth century, when it was referred to as “twins” in 1835. The whoopie pie is known by a variety of other names, including the black moon, black and white, and bob and gob (bob for gob).

The whoopie pie, the official treat of Maine

The whoopie pie is a popular dessert in the United States. Indeed, this is the state’s official treat, as proclaimed by Governor Paul LePage. The blueberry pie is the official dessert of this state, and it has been for many years. In New England, whoopie pie has long been regarded a traditional dessert item. It has become somewhat of a tradition among the Amish community in Pennsylvania. Several states in the United States claim that they are the originators of the recipe’s formulation.

The states of Pennsylvania, Maine, Massachusetts, Virginia, and New Hampshire all claim to be the originators of this delectable confection. However, as of this writing, it is not feasible to pinpoint with confidence the precise origin of this popular American confection.

What are the versions of the whoopie pie?

The whoopie pie is available in a number of various variations. Most American women have rewritten the recipe, modifying the content of the biscuits as well as the consistency and flavoring of the cream. Some varieties are more well-known than others, but all of them involve marshmallow fluff in the cream mixture at some point in the process. At addition to being readily available in food shops, marshmallow fluff may be simply manufactured at home as well. The recipe is remarkably similar to that of an Italian meringue, with the exception that colorless corn syrup is used to substitute some of the sugar.

Those spiced pumpkin whoopie pies are a seasonal favorite, especially throughout the fall season.

The gingerbread variant is a popular choice for Christmas and New Year’s celebrations.

A scrumptious marshmallow cream and vanilla buttercream are placed inside of them for a wonderful treat.

What are the similar varieties of whoopie pie around the world?

Whoopie pies are distant cousins of other desserts. However, the notion of a cake or cookie sandwich has influenced more than one person in addition to its unique consistency. Indeed, the moon cake, for example, is quite similar in appearance to the whoopie pie. Graham Cracker, a scientist from the United States, first used it on April 29, 1917. The moon cake is more frequent in the southern United States than in the northern United States. The consistency of the two cookies is what distinguishes them from one another.

  1. After that, the cookie sandwich is dipped in dark chocolate, which hardens as the chocolate cools.
  2. Indeed, it is made out of biscuits, marshmallows, and dark chocolate.
  3. The term “s’mores” is an acronym for the phrase “some more.” This cookie sandwich is made out of two Graham crackers biscuits with a toasted marshmallow and a square of chocolate sandwiched in the middle, and it is very delicious.
  4. The cookie sandwich is without a doubt one of the most well-known and best-selling sweets in the world, with multiple trademarks, including names like as Oreo, Prince de Lu, and Bahlsen biscuits, among others.
  5. There are four ingredients in this recipe: egg whites, sugar, icing sugar, and finely reduced almond powder.
  6. There are a plethora of different filling possibilities available.
  7. They are quite well-known throughout Argentina and South America.
  8. Whoopie pies are extremely mellow desserts.
  9. We encourage you to give this dish a try.

Preparation time: 30 minutes Cooking Time: 30 minutes to 2 hours 1 hour is the whole time allotted. Course:Dessert American and vegetarian cuisines are available. Servings:6people

For the cakes

  • A cup of flour
  • 2 ounces cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 12 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 12 cup unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1 big egg at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 14 teaspoon coffee powder or instant coffee granules

For the filling

  • Unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1 cup caster sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla essence
  • Salt
  • 1 cup marshmallow creme

Cakes

  • Preheat the oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit (150 degrees Celsius)
  • Prepare 2 baking sheets by lining them with parchment paper and setting them aside
  • Using a fine mesh sifter, sift together the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt. Remove from consideration
  • Brown sugar and butter should be whisked together until light and frothy in the bowl of a stand mixer
  • Add the egg and continue to beat until fully combined
  • Mix in the vanilla with the flat beater until it is well integrated. Remove the spatula from the bottom and sides of the basin and continue mixing for another 30 seconds. In a separate dish, whisk together the buttermilk and the coffee until smooth. Add one-third of the flour mixture with the flat beater set on the lowest speed, followed by half of the buttermilk mixture
  • Repeat the process by adding one-third of the flour, followed by the remainder of the buttermilk. Mix for another minute once you’ve added the last of the flour. Lay out teaspoons of dough on a piece of parchment paper, spacing them at least 3 inches apart. 16 minutes in the oven and on the stovetop
  • Preparing the second tray while the first tray is baking is a good idea. Bake the second dish and set the cakes aside to cool for 2 hours before serving.

Filling

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a flat beater, cream together the butter and sugar until foamy. Mix in the vanilla and salt until well combined. In a separate bowl, combine the marshmallow creme and beat for 3 minutes. Fill a piping bag fitted with a big plain tip with the mixture
  • Pipe out the mixture. Refrigerate the piping bag for 1 hour before using it.

Assembly

  • Distribute the frosting equally across the middle of the flat side of the half cakes
  • And Cover the flat side with the other half and gently press until the crème reaches the edges of the flat side slightly. Serve immediately or store in the refrigerator for up to 3 days in an airtight container.

Lauren Sarah-Eden is the founder of the pastry cuisine blog Les Trois Madeleines, where she reinvents glitzy sweets with her own unique pastries. Madeleines are one of her favorite desserts, and she likes exploring new blogs and communicating with other food bloggers.

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