When It Comes To Choosing America’s Favorite Dessert Apple Pie Is A Contender

10 Most Popular Desserts in America

Who doesn’t have a need for a delicious, luscious dessert, especially after a hearty dinner? Interestingly, the term “desservir” derives from the French word “desservir,” which translates as “to clear away,” in this case, the leftovers from the dinner table. And, depending on where you are in the world, it may include a range of sweet sweets to enjoy following supper. In China, it is possible that it will contain delicious red beans or dates. Flan is a dish that might be served in Mexico. Generally speaking, the sweeter the dessert, the better it is in the United States.

Take, for example, apple pie, which was not invented in the United States but is as American as, well, apple pie.

Join us as we count down the top ten most popular desserts available in the United States of America.

10: Cheesecake

However, while many people believe that the cheesecake got its start in New York, its roots may be traced back to ancient Greece and the island of Samos. It is believed that the earliest recipe for Greek cheesecake was written by the writer Athenaeus around 230 A.D., and that cheese molds dating back to 2000 B.C.E. have been discovered there by anthropologists. In 1872, however, it was Americans who introduced cream cheese to the cake. When a New York dairy farmer attempted to recreate the French cheese Neufchatel by mistake, he accidently developed what we now know as Philadelphia Cream Cheese.

It’s served without any additional ingredients or garnishes, just as it is.

9: Cupcakes

Cupcakes are no longer reserved for children. And if you’re looking for a treat that’s completely customized to your preferences, visit your local gourmet cupcake store. Cupcakes — especially cupcake bakeries — are extremely popular in the United States, and it’s simple to understand why. Every cake flavor imaginable is represented in miniature form by these little, visually gorgeous cakes. You can expect to find anything from the conventional vanilla and chocolate varieties to more exotic flavors such as Key lime pie, red velvet, and cookies ‘n’ cream in this collection.

In addition, you may bake beautiful cupcakes at home using a muffin pan and fancy paper liners to decorate them.

8: Jell-O

Jell-O will always have a place in my heart. At least, that’s what the dessert’s iconic vintage advertisement proclaims. Although Jell-O is a trademarked brand name, it has come to be associated with any type of gelatinessert, and the jiggling has an undoubtedly amusing appeal. Easy to prepare, it requires little cleaning and may be served immediately. All that is required is the addition of boiling water to the powdered mix, followed by a few hours of chilling. Listed below is some information you may not be aware of: It is a refined form of collagen, a natural protein present in the tendons, ligaments, and tissues of animals.

Cooking the connective tissues, bones, and skins of animals results in the creation of this dish.

And, sure, that is what the Jell-O brand is composed of as well. Take the powdered gelatin and combine it with some artificial sweetener and food coloring to create a very popular dessert. One for the advertising industry, and another for the advertising industry.

7: Carrot Cake

Carrot cake, how I love thee. Not only is it equally creamy and wonderful, but it’s also quite probably the greatest dessert to select when you want to mislead yourself into believing you’re eating healthily because it’s so rich and creamy. Carrots are beneficial to your health, so carrot cake can’t be all that horrible, can it? Unfortunately, this is not the case. Carrot cake, which first became famous in the United States in the mid-20th century, is a wonderful combination of sweet and spicy cake that is topped with cream cheese frosting (made from cream cheese, butter, powdered sugar and vanilla extract).

For those who are concerned about fat and calories, you can simply lighten up this recipe by making a few easy tweaks, such as lowering the quantity of sugar and oil used, and adding crushed pineapple to keep the moistness of the cake.

6: Apple Pie

Baseball, hot dogs, and apple pie are some of the things that define America. Apple pie, on the other hand, was not even invented in the United States. Apple pies and tarts may be traced all the way back to the 14th century in European cuisine. The earliest known apple pie recipes date back to 1390, and they employed honey instead of the then-rarely used sugar. The pie gained popularity in the United Kingdom throughout the 1700s, and it was later introduced to the new American colonial territories.

When Americans celebrate their independence from England on July 4, apple pie may be found on picnic tables all around the country, owing to the “red, white and blue” symbolism associated with the holiday.

Even while most people enjoy their apple pies fresh and warm from the oven, frozen apple pies are still popular, as Sara Lee can attest.

5: Ice Cream

Despite the fact that the origins of ice cream are not known, culinary historians typically attribute its discovery to the Chinese and the flavored ices they ate as far back as 3000 BCE. Marco Polo is credited with bringing the concept to Italy, where it was developed into the familiar ice cream that we know and love today in the 17th century, according to legend. In the year 1792, the cookbook “The New Art of Cookery, According to Present Practice” is considered to have contained the earliest known ice cream recipe in the United States.

A variety of flavors have come and gone throughout the years, but none have had as much impact on the ice cream industry as cookies n’ cream in 1979 and chocolate chip cookie dough in 1991.

4: Brownies

Brownies are a dessert that may be served hot or cold, from scratch or from a mix, and they are one of the most adaptable sweets available, providing you appreciate a lot of chocolate. The consistency of certain brownie aficionados want their creations to be more cake-like, but others prefer their creations to be fudgier and moister. In general, the amount of eggs and fat you use in the recipe, as well as the length of time you bake them, will determine how nicely your brownies come out. Brownies can also be customized to suit your specific preferences.

Cream cheese, peanut butter or chocolate chips, coffee, white chocolate, and frosting, for example, are all common additions to cupcakes.

3: Chocolate Chip Cookies

When it comes to cookie recipes, there are few that are more popular than the classic chocolate chip recipe. The combination of cookie dough with those delectable semisweet chocolate morsels is difficult to surpass, especially when they are freshly baked and still warm from the oven. Chocolate chip cookies, on the other hand, are unmistakably American. Ruth Wakefield, who owned and operated the Toll House restaurant in Whitman, Massachusetts, came up with the dish in the late 1930s. As a result of her dish’s popularity with her visitors, it was featured on Betty Crocker’s radio program, and in 1939, Wakefield sold the recipe rights to Nestlé.

2: German Chocolate Cake

It was really “Mahogany cakes” that were the very first chocolate cakes in American history, and they date back to the late 1800s. Around 1886, recipes for mahogany cakes began to emerge in cookbooks such as Sarah Tyson Rorer’s “The Philadelphia Cookbook,” which contained recipes for other cakes. Baker’s chocolate firm was named after Sam German, who was working at the same time to develop sweet baking chocolate for the Baker’s chocolate company. However, “German’s Chocolate” did not become popular until the late 1950s.

1: Fudge

It’s very tough to stop at just one or two squares of fudge, which is the sole drawback to this treat. And when it comes to fudge, there’s a taste to suit every palate. Traditionalists may stick with the milk or dark chocolate varieties, while nut fans can add walnuts or macadamia nuts for a little more crunch to their bars. The nicest part about making fudge is that it’s simple to make, even for youngsters to do. In addition, fudge is a wonderful present for any event or holiday.

Make some homemade fudge if you’ve never had the pleasure of tasting it before. You’ll understand why this rich sweet has captured American dessert fans for more than 100 years after you’ve tried it. The original publication date was February 23, 2009.

Most Popular Desserts in the U.S.A.

Jello is a simple dessert to prepare, and it requires little to no cleanup. All that is required is the addition of boiling water to the powdered mix, followed by a few hours of chilling.

What is the most popular dessert in America?

Ice cream manufacturing is a massive $8 billion business in the United States.

What is the most popular bake sale item?

Bake sale goods such as cupcakes, cookies, and brownies are some of the most popular because they’re compact and straightforward to distribute.

What is the most popular baked good in America?

Doughnuts. It is estimated that 123 million doughnuts were consumed and over $350 million was spent on doughnuts in 2016, according to WebstaurantStore Blog.

What is the most popular dessert in America?

Cake, cheesecake, cupcakes, jell-O, carrot cake, apple pie, ice cream, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and chocolate cake are some of the most popular sweets in the United States of America.

Lots More Information

  • Jackie Burrell is the author of this work. “To make the tastiest bar cookies, include your preferred flavors into the batter.” “Chocolate Cake,” San Jose Mercury News (Dec. 13, 2011)
  • Chocolates (Dec. 15, 2011)
  • San Jose Mercury News (Dec. 13, 2011). Eating Well, published in 2008 (Dec. 15, 2011). “Carrot Cake,” as they say in the UK. Food Channel (accessed on December 15, 2011)
  • April/May 2005. “The Top 15 Most Popular Ice Cream Flavors.” “The Top 15 Most Popular Ice Cream Flavors.” Foodchannel.com. The Huffington Post reported on December 15, 2011, that “Eating Raw Cookie Dough Really Can Make You Sick – in Unexpected Ways.” Hungry Monster, published on December 9, 2011 (updated on December 15, 2011). “The History of Cheesecake.” The year 2008 is a year of transition (Dec. 15, 2011). This is the JELL-O Gallery, which has the ID 9671. “The Origins of JELL-O.” “The History of JELL-O.” Tamsyn Kent (2008, December 15, 2011)
  • Kent, Tamsyn. “It’s the cupcake renaissance.” Loeper, Kelly, and the BBC, October 23, 2009 (December 15, 2011)
  • BBC. “Low-fat carrot cake versus traditional carrot cake.” The Journal: Queen’s University, published on December 11, 2011 (accessed on December 15, 2011)
  • Malgieri, Nick, “Cakes: Recipes and Tips,” published on December 15, 2011. Epicurious. “Carrot Cake Cookies,” published in Martha Stewart Living on December 15, 2011. “Making Fudge,” Martha Stewart Living (December 15, 2011)
  • Martha Stewart Living. Lynn Olver’s blog, published on December 15, 2011, is a good place to start. “Ice Cream,” according to the Food Timeline. Jane Marchiony Paretti, Jane Marchiony Paretti, Jane Marchiony “The man who was responsible for the invention of the ice cream cone” You may enjoy the meal because Italo Marchiony invented it – and he invented it in Hoboken.” The Hudson Reporter published an article on December 15, 2011 titled “A History of Apple Pie.” Pie Space published an article titled “A History of Apple Pie.” “Taste Test — Brownie Mixes,” December 5, 2008 (accessed December 15, 2011)
  • Santos-Neves, Carolina. Epicurious. On the 16th of December, 2011, “Cheesecake History,” according to What’s Cooking America. 2008 (as of December 15, 2011)
  • “The History of Apple Pie,” according to What’s Cooking America. Whole Foods Market, “Carrots,” (Dec. 15, 2011). The year 2011 is a year of transition (Dec. 15, 2011) “The History of Fudge,” by Woodstock Candy, dbid=21. 2011 (Dec. 15, 2011)
  • 2011 (Dec. 15, 2011)

This Is How Apple Pie Became America’s Favorite Dessert

Reader’s Digest contributor Matthew Cohen The grill is blazing hot, the beer is chilling, and the fireworks are set to go off at any moment. Burgers, potato salad, and, of course, apple pie are all on the menu. However, this all-American treat isn’t quite as homegrown as you might expect. In fact, according to Libby O’Connell, author of The American Plate: A Culinary History in 100 Bites, “not a single component in apple pie comes from the country we name the United States.” Exactly where does this seemingly domestic joy come from, and how did it come to be?

The recipe

To make “coffyns,” which are airtight pastry shells that are not particularly delicious, the British utilized animal fat, wheat, and water in combination with other ingredients. These savory pastries were typically packed with meat or venison, depending on the region. Because of the influx of German immigrants, the shells grew flakier (like the strudels they brought with them) and the meat contents were substituted with apples, a creative method to make use of damaged fruit.

Apples

The delicious, juicy fruit that we utilize in our pies is not indigenous to North America, which is known for its crab apple production. Its origins may be traced back to Kazakhstan. The Romans then crossed it with astringent apples that were utilized in the production of cider. (“Appleseed” Chapman did, in fact, establish orchards all throughout the United States, according to historical records.) Do you enjoy apples? Here are some alternative delicious and nutritious ways to consume apples that you may not have known about.

Wheat

Ancient wheat has been discovered in Iraq, Iran, and other parts of the Middle East, where it was first farmed more than 9,000 years ago. Following its expansion across Europe and then to the New World, where it failed horribly, the “king of grains” was replaced by another Native American staple: maize, which colonists relied on for baking. When Russian immigrants arrived in the late 1800s, they brought with them a wheat type known as Turkey Red, which was better suited to our environment.

Lard and Butter

Wild boars (the progenitors of lard-producing pigs) are found throughout Asia, Europe, and Africa, and are considered to be endangered.

Actually, it was Christopher Columbus, on his second journey to the New World in 1493, who introduced pigs and cattle to the continent, which became the source of all dairy products.

Sugar and Spices

Columbus also served as a deliveryman for sugar, which was first produced some 4,000 years ago in Indonesia, India, China, and what is now Papua New Guinea. Columbus was also a navigator and navigator for sugar. Cinnamon is derived from an evergreen tree that is indigenous to Sri Lanka. (It is said to have been eaten by the prophet Moses and the Roman emperor Nero, among others.) The form of cinnamon most typically found on supermarket shelves today is cassia cinnamon, which originated in southern China and is now grown around the world.

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Keep an eye out for these foods that contain unexpected amounts of sugar.

Becoming an American “Original”

As soon as all of the elements were in place, putting them all together was a breeze. —Well, it turns out that it wasn’t that simple after all. Despite the fact that the first apple pie recipes date back to the 1300s, it took approximately 500 years for the dish to become popular in the United States of America. “During the Civil War, both Union and Confederate troops scavenged for apples and commandeered the hearths—and flour bins—of white farmers and black tenants to bake pies,” writes John T.

“During the Civil War, both Union and Confederate troops scavenged for apples and commandeered the hearths—and flour bins—of white farmers and black tenants to bake pies.” “Adversity during World War II imprinted the flavor of apple pie on the palates of future generations.” After all, pie had become “the American word for affluence,” according to an editorial in the New York Times published in 1902.

The term “as American as apple pie” first appeared in literature in the 1920s, and by World War II, troops were pledging their allegiance to their mothers and apple pies.

The original version of this article appeared on NPR on July 3, 2016.

Great American Bites: Great apple pie in perfect small-town setting

  • The setting:National Pie Day was celebrated on January 23, but if you missed it, don’t worry, it’s never too late to indulge in a slice of pie! In accordance with the National Pie Council, apple is the most popular taste in the United States. It is also the speciality – but only one of many excellent pies – at Lou’s in Hanover, New Hampshire. Founded around a classic New England town green bordered by Dartmouth College’s earliest 18th century buildings and an imposing library, Hanover is the only Ivy League college town that retains its small-town feel. Hanover is the only Ivy League college town that retains its small-town feel. One of Hanover’s most important commercial areas is the retail sector of Main Street. Lou’s, a classic college town coffee shop and restaurant, is located on this stretch of Main Street, which is just five blocks long. Lou Bressett, who served in the Marine Corps during WWII, built his eponymous restaurant in 1947, and the building has remained unchanged since then. Toby and Patty Fried have been the owners of Lou’s for the past 21 years
  • They are most known for introducing Mexican cuisine to the menu. Lou’s has only had three owners in over seven decades, with the most recent being Toby and Patty Fried. Lou’s has a devoted following, which is mostly comprised of Dartmouth students who come for the all-day breakfast and baked products, as well as a continuous stream of local residents and retirees. This is bolstered by Appalachian Trail thru-hikers who come to Lou’s in droves from spring to autumn, eager to sample its world-famous pies, muffins, and cookies, given that the famed hiking trail goes straight through downtown Hanover and reaches Main Street only a few blocks from the bakery. A new type of regular comes to Lou every four years or so, and they’re called politicians. A typical stump stop before the crucial New Hampshire primary, Dartmouth College also serves as a site for debates and other public events. Last year, the advance team for Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul was spotted here before the Republican debate, but four years ago, it was the Democrats who showed up at Lou’s — and then at the debate – before the Republican debate. A few of the most well-known names affiliated with the area are Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter. Lou’s Restaurant, with its white wood and red brick front, appears to have been frozen in time and is brimming with small-town charm. When you go in, you are greeted with two-sided glass display cases brimming with tantalizing baked products, particularly their famed pies, which come in a variety of flavors and are shown on staff t-shirts as a cartoon image of a mile-high apple pie. There is a long diner-style counter behind this, with a quarter-height wall separating two rows of full service green vinyl diner seats and tables. The walls are filled with framed black and white historical prints of bygone Hanover, and most of the town, like Lou’s, has remained quaintly unaltered through the years, as well. Visit for the following reasons: Pies, pancakes, breakfast tacos, cruller French toast, and corned beef hash are just a few of the options. The food consists of: Lou’s is open from six or seven a.m. until three p.m., seven days a week, and it offers its entire breakfast and lunch menus at all times – but it is the breakfast that draws people in. When it comes to Trip Advisor, Yelp, and other review sites, Lou’s routinely receives great rankings, and if you read the comments, you’ll see that virtually all of them are about breakfast. I can’t say that I blame them. I’ve eaten at Lou’s a number of times, and while the lunch menu is adequate (burgers, salads, and sandwiches), the breakfast items, particularly the house specials, are what I remember most. The fact that Lou’s is both a bakery and a restaurant, with extended bakery counter hours and a brisk take-out business, means that pastries are a huge part of the company. For this reason, I believe the cruller French toast to be the most noteworthy menu item, since it combines the best of two worlds: breakfast and baking. Despite the fact that it is sweet, the outcome of egging and griddling a sugar glazed doughnut stick is not quite as overpowering as you may expect the consequence of doing so. This is because the cruller bears up well to the procedure, and the inside is unexpectedly light and airy, much more so than bread (Lou’s serves French toast on thick Texas bread, but the cruller version is preferable.) The egg dip is light and refreshing, and it is a unique mix that you won’t find anywhere else. On a recent visit, our waitress informed us that the Corned Beef Hash and the Big Green are the most popular dishes. In the latter case, a Dartmouth sports nickname (as in “Go Big Green!”) is given to the standard trucker’s special, which consists of your choice of two pancakes or two slices of (regular) French toast served with your choice of two eggs, two slices of bacon, two sausage links, home fries, and toast. With the outstanding pancakes, it becomes even more filling and satisfying. The Corned Beef Hash, which is produced in-house using a full fresh corned beef brisket, as well as onions, potatoes, and seasonings, is the most noteworthy dish. There is a distinct flavor of freshness, and regulars rave about it, but as a major fan of corned beef hash, I was looking for a more chunky combination of ingredients. While Lou’s rendition has a fresh flavor and is wonderfully griddle-crisped, the quality is somewhat lost in the chopped texture — it’s decent, but not quite as fantastic as I would have liked. Even if it’s nitpicking to compare these meals to restaurant perfection, that’s how close Lou’s comes to being flawless. The pancakes are almost as good as the waffles. Even though they taste quite fresh, and the creamy buttermilk flavor really comes through in the batter, they’re a little too thin for my liking. The berry variations, such as blueberry or the hallmark “Very Berry” with blueberries and cranberries (which is very New England), are very densely packed with nutrients. The enigmatic “breakfast syrup” may be substituted for actual Vermont maple syrup for $1.95 when purchasing French toast or pancakes, and the upgrade is available when ordering both. Choose the authentic thing, which comes in a souvenir bottle with Lou’s label, and you’ll be able to take any leftovers home with you. While donuts and syrup are provided in the bakery for breakfast, they also make handmade granola packed with oats, almonds, raisins and honey that is available in bags to go and has a devoted following either eaten alone or with fruit salad and yogurt. Mexican-inspired items on the breakfast menu are particularly popular with students, particularly the tacos, which consist of three flour tortillas filled with egg, Monterey Jack cheese, and your choice of bacon, chorizo sausage, mushrooms, or peppers, served with sour cream, salsa, and optional guacamole as a side. No matter whatever filling you pick, you’ll receive a fair amount of it, and the grilled tortillas are the star of the show — they’re light and pastry-like, rather than the heavier, bready commercial version. Whether you’re there for breakfast or lunch, you’ll almost certainly end up with some sort of pastry. Muffins, doughnuts, and cookies (particularly chocolate chip) are also strong rivals, as is the whoopie pie, a New England specialty consisting of two devil’s food cakes sandwiched together with a creamy whipped filling and served warm. However, it is the pie that has made Lou’s renowned for 66 years, particularly the astronomically high apple pie. It takes nearly five inches to make a wedge of apple pie, and the recipe is simple – just thin slices of apple, plenty of them, piled up and seasoned with sugar and cinnamon, with none of the watery “goo” commonly found in apple pie. It is a drier type, with the apple flavor taking precedence over anything else, and the flaky crust is just delicious. Chocolate cream and mixed berry are the other two most popular flavors. The berry, like the apple, is mostly composed of fruit, with a high concentration of strawberries, blueberries, black and red raspberries, and little to no binder. Whole pies are also available for takeout — and they sell out almost every day. People who visit the restaurant express their appreciation in the following ways: “I always eat one of the Mexican meals,” said Gregg Cerveny, an administrator at Dartmouth College who goes to Houston on a regular basis for work. “The soft tacos are my favorite since the shell is light and delicious, which is a welcome change from the hard tacos I’m used to eating in Texas. And the pie is absolutely delicious.” Pilgrimage-worthy?: If you are in Hanover, this is by far the best option for breakfast, and it is also the best option for lunch. Rating:Mmmm (“Blah,” “OK,” “Mmm,” “Yum!”,” and “OMG!”) The price ranges from $-$$ ($ inexpensive, $$ moderate, $$$ expensive). Details: 30 South Main Street, Hanover
  • 603-643-3321
  • Lousrestaurant.net. Contact information: Larry Olmsted has been writing about food and travel for more than 15 years, and his work has appeared in numerous publications. He is a passionate eater and cook who has taken cooking classes in Italy, served as a judge in a BBQ competition, and dined with Julia Child. To keep up with him on Twitter, @TravelFoodGuy, or to suggest an unusual American eatery for him to visit, send him an e-mail at [email protected]

American as apple pie? The true origins of 3 favorite Fourth of July foods

(Image courtesy of stock.xchng.com) Americans are extremely possessive individuals, claiming ownership of a wide range of innovations and works. Is it true that several of the meals that are ubiquitous on our tables on the Fourth of July were actually developed in our country? You may discover more about the history of hot dogs, hamburgers, and apple pie if you continue reading. How Did Hot Dogs Get Their Start? Is it true that hot dogs are distinctively American? In a way, yes. They have been around since the 13th century, when they were known as frankfurters in Frankfurt, Germany, and were progenitors to current hot dogs.

  • Feltman, on the other hand, did not refer to his creation as a “hot dog.” According to NPR, Yale Law librarian Fred Shapiro attributes the invention of the word “hot dog” to a street seller.
  • In the December 31, 1892 edition of the Paterson Daily Press in New Jersey, there was a reference to the war.
  • The tiny child has become so accustomed to this type of food that he now refers to it simply as a ‘hot dog.’ “Hey, Mister, give me a hot dog quick,” yelled the rosy-cheeked gamin at the man as a Press reporter stood near by yesterday night, causing the man to startle.
  • The origins of the hamburger in the United States are a subject of intense controversy.
  • (Image courtesy of stock.xchng.com) Charlie Nagreen, Frank and Charles Menches, Oscar Weber Bilby, and Fletcher David are among the contenders for the position.
  • Rosa L.
  • According to the 1995 article, the hamburger was “first served 100 years ago today at Louis’ Lunch, which started in 1895 and has been passed down through the Lassen family for four generations.
  • (Image courtesy of stock.xchng.com) Since the 1500s, Dutch apple pies with latticed crusts have been a popular dessert.
  • “Good apple pies are a major part of our domestic happiness,” she wrote.
  • In America, Thomas Jefferson experimented with the development of new apple tree kinds, and according to some estimates, as many as 14,000 different varieties of apples arose in the United States throughout the nineteenth century.
  • Recipes for pies made with raw apples as well as stewed apples were featured in the earliest known American cookbook, “American Cookery,” written by Amelia Simmons in 1798 and published by the American Cookery Society.

For more information, contact Al.com writer Kelly Kazek at 256-701-0576 or follow her on Facebook. Please keep in mind that if you purchase something after clicking on one of our affiliate links, we may receive a fee.

The Absolute Best Apple Pie in New York

The following image is taken from stock.xchng.com: All kinds of innovations and creations are claimed by Americans, who are possessive by nature. Nevertheless, did any of the meals that are usually served during celebrations such as the Fourth of July originate in our country? You may discover more about the history of hot dogs, hamburgers, and apple pie by continuing to read this article! How Did Hot Dogs Get Their Name? Is it true that hot dogs are only available in the United States? In a way, yes, but not entirely.

See also:  What Is The Name Of The Dessert When You Have A Slice Of Pecan Pie And A Scoop Of Ice Ceream

It was 1870 when German immigrant Charles Feltman started selling sausages in rolls on Coney Island, according to a report on the website of National Public Radio.

According to NPR, Yale Law librarian Fred Shapiro attributes the invention of the word “hot dog” to a street vendor who sold hot dogs.

Morris said that a sausage vendor by the name of Thomas Francis Xavier Morris, who went by the moniker “Hot Dog Morris,” began selling hot dogs in Paterson around 1892.

A new addition to a local ice-skating carnival is described in an item on the front page by the author: “The Wiener wurst guy, with his kettle of scalding hot sausages and buns, is a new adjunct to the sport.” “Somehow or another, a frankfurter and a roll seem to find their way exactly to the area where the vacuum is most felt,” he says further.

  1. It took only a few seconds to stuff the hot dog into a slit in a roll, add a dab of mustard to the dog with a piece of flat whittled stick, and the order was complete.” How Hamburgers Came to Be.
  2. There is some debate over whether the term derives from beef patties that originated in Hamburg, Germany or if it comes from the addition of a bun to the dish.
  3. However, according to an article on the Library of Congress website by Connecticut Rep.
  4. DeLauro, the first hamburger was served in New Haven in 1895, according to the entry.
  5. According to tradition, apple pie has been around since before the United States was founded.
  6. According to Mark McWilliams, author of the book “The Story Behind the Dish,” novelist Jane Austen declared apple pie to be a “important part of our family pleasure” in a letter to her sister.
  7. The Mayflower carried apple seeds to the colonies, which were first planted in Massachusetts in 1625, according to McWilliams, who noted that England had more than 70 types of apples in the 1600s.
  8. In his article, McWilliams writes that just a small number of those are now being farmed.
  9. As early as the 1860s, the expression “As American as apple pie” was in common usage, establishing apple pie’s position in history as a national treasure.

Get in touch with al.com writer Kelly Kazek by calling 256-701-0576 or by following her on Facebook. Readers should be aware that if they make a purchase after clicking on one of our affiliate links, we may receive a small compensation.

The Best Apples for Apple Pie

(Image courtesy of stock.xchng.com.) Americans are a conceited lot, claiming ownership of all kind of inventions and achievements. But did any of the items that are usually served on our Fourth of July tables come from this region? You can discover more about the history of hot dogs, hamburgers, and apple pie if you keep reading. The History of Hot Dogs Is it true that hot dogs are only available in the United States? To some extent, yes. The frankfurters that are the forerunners of today’s hot dogs have been around since the 13th century in Frankfurt, Germany.

  1. However, Feltman did not refer to his innovation as a “hot dog.” According to NPR, Yale Law librarian Fred Shapiro attributes the invention of the word “hot dog” to a seller.
  2. In the December 31, 1892 edition of the Paterson Daily Press in New Jersey, there was a reference to it.
  3. The tiny child has been so accustomed to this type of food that he now refers to it as a ‘hot dog.’ ‘Hey, Mister, give me a hot dog quick,’ yelled a rosy-cheeked gamin at the man while a reporter from the Press stood nearby yesterday night.
  4. The term is derived from beef patties that originated in Hamburg, Germany, however it is unclear who was the first to use a bun in the sandwich.
  5. However, according to a post on the Library of Congress website by Connecticut Rep.
  6. DeLauro, the first hamburger was served in New Haven in 1895.
  7. (Image courtesy of stock.xchng.com.) Since the 1500s, Dutch apple pies with latticed crusts have been popular.
  8. In America, Thomas Jefferson experimented with the development of new apple tree kinds, and according to some reports, as many as 14,000 different varieties of apples arose in the United States throughout the 1800s.
  9. Recipes for pies made with raw apples as well as stewed apples were featured in the first known American cookbook, “American Cookery,” which was penned by Amelia Simmons in 1798.

For more information, contact Al.com reporter Kelly Kazek at 256-701-0576 or find her on Facebook. Readers should be aware that if they make a purchase after clicking on one of our affiliate links, we may receive a commission.

What Makes the Best Apple Pie?

(Source: stock.xchng.com) Americans are a possessive lot, claiming ownership of all types of innovations and creations. However, did some of the dishes that are typically found on our tables on the Fourth of July actually originate in our country? Continue reading to find out more about the origins of hot dogs, hamburgers, and apple pie. The Origins of Hot Dogs Is it true that hot dogs are only found in the United States? To a certain extent. Frankfurters, the sausage ancestors of contemporary hot dogs, have been present since the 13th century, when they were known as frankfurters in Frankfurt, Germany.

However, Feltman did not refer to his invention as a “hot dog.” According to NPR, Yale Law librarian Fred Shapiro credits a seller with coining the phrase “hot dog.” He claimed that a sausage vendor called Thomas Francis Xavier Morris, whose nickname was “Hot Dog Morris,” sold hot dogs in Paterson, New Jersey, as early as 1892.

In an item on the front page, the author describes a local ice-skating carnival, saying, “A new adjunct to the sport is the Wiener wurst guy with his kettle of scalding hot sausages and buns.” “Somehow or another, a frankfurter and a roll manage to find their way straight to the area where the void is felt the most.” The tiny child has grown so accustomed to this type of food that he now refers to it as a ‘hot dog.’ ‘Hey, Mister, give me a hot dog right away,’ yelled a rosy-cheeked gamin at the man while a reporter from the Press stood nearby yesterday night.

“The ‘hot dog’ was promptly put into a gash in a roll, a dash of mustard was also poured on to the dog with a piece of flat whittled wood, and the request was accomplished.” The History of Hamburgers The origins of the hamburger in the United States are widely discussed.

(Source: stock.xchng.com) Charlie Nagreen, Frank and Charles Menches, Oscar Weber Bilby, and Fletcher David are among the candidates.

Rosa L.

According to the 1995 article, the hamburger was “first served 100 years ago at Louis’ Lunch, which started in 1895 and has been handed through the Lassen family for four generations.” Hamburgers are provided exclusively on white bread, with a choice of onion, tomato, or cheese, but no condiments.” The Origins of Apple Pie As may be imagined, apple pie’s origins date back considerably further than the formation of the United States.

(Source: stock.xchng.com) Dutch apple pies with latticed crusts have been around since the 1500s.

In America, Thomas Jefferson experimented with the development of new apple tree kinds, and according to some estimates, as many as 14,000 different varieties of apples arose in the United States throughout the 1800s.

The oldest known American cookbook, “American Cookery,” authored by Amelia Simmons in 1798, includes recipes for pies made with both uncooked and stewed apples.

Call Al.com reporter Kelly Kazek at 256-701-0576 or find her on Facebook. Note to readers: If you make a purchase after clicking on one of our affiliate links, we may receive a fee.

Apple-Picking

(Image courtesy of stock.xchng.com) Americans are extremely possessive individuals, claiming ownership of a wide range of innovations and works. Is it true that several of the meals that are ubiquitous on our tables on the Fourth of July were actually developed in our country? You may discover more about the history of hot dogs, hamburgers, and apple pie if you continue reading. How Did Hot Dogs Get Their Start? Is it true that hot dogs are distinctively American? In a way, yes. They have been around since the 13th century, when they were known as frankfurters in Frankfurt, Germany, and were progenitors to current hot dogs.

  • Feltman, on the other hand, did not refer to his creation as a “hot dog.” According to NPR, Yale Law librarian Fred Shapiro attributes the invention of the word “hot dog” to a street seller.
  • In the December 31, 1892 edition of the Paterson Daily Press in New Jersey, there was a reference to the war.
  • The tiny child has become so accustomed to this type of food that he now refers to it simply as a ‘hot dog.’ “Hey, Mister, give me a hot dog quick,” yelled the rosy-cheeked gamin at the man as a Press reporter stood near by yesterday night, causing the man to startle.
  • The origins of the hamburger in the United States are a subject of intense controversy.
  • (Image courtesy of stock.xchng.com) Charlie Nagreen, Frank and Charles Menches, Oscar Weber Bilby, and Fletcher David are among the contenders for the position.
  • Rosa L.
  • According to the 1995 article, the hamburger was “first served 100 years ago today at Louis’ Lunch, which started in 1895 and has been passed down through the Lassen family for four generations.
  • (Image courtesy of stock.xchng.com) Since the 1500s, Dutch apple pies with latticed crusts have been a popular dessert.
  • “Good apple pies are a major part of our domestic happiness,” she wrote.
  • In America, Thomas Jefferson experimented with the development of new apple tree kinds, and according to some estimates, as many as 14,000 different varieties of apples arose in the United States throughout the nineteenth century.
  • Recipes for pies made with raw apples as well as stewed apples were featured in the earliest known American cookbook, “American Cookery,” written by Amelia Simmons in 1798 and published by the American Cookery Society.

For more information, contact Al.com writer Kelly Kazek at 256-701-0576 or follow her on Facebook. Please keep in mind that if you purchase something after clicking on one of our affiliate links, we may receive a fee.

  • Braeburn, Cortland, Empire, Fuji, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, McIntosh, Red Delicious, Rome, Gala, and more varieties

Braeburn, Cortland, Empire, Fuji, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, McIntosh, Red Delicious, Rome, Gala, and many more varieties are available.

Color-Coding: How Browning in Apples Provides a Key to Texture

A genuinely astounding variety of textures and tastes developed, perhaps more varied than the distinctions between fresh apples themselves. Some varieties, including as Granny Smith and Empire, were particularly adept at holding their form, resulting in the tender-but-firm slices of apple pie that I enjoy. Granny Smiths, on the other hand, are far too sour, and Empires, far too sweet. Other apples had the reverse problem: they had a good flavor but were mushy and lackluster in texture. Unfortunately, I couldn’t come up with a single apple that was totally effective in terms of both flavor and texture, so I gave up.

  • Some fruits, such as Red Delicious, became dark brown nearly soon after harvesting.
  • In order of their amount of browning**, I positioned the apples on a dish in the same order.
  • The order in which they are positioned in the shot is determined by the degree to which they have browned in comparison to their original hue, which is why some appear to be out of order.
  • Cooks will keep trimmed artichokes in acidulated water for the same reason—it stops them from browning.
  • There’s another thing that acid does: it decomposes protein.
  • In fact, taking a glance at this well organized spectrum of apples provides a very decent indicator of how well each fruit will stand up during the cooking process.
  • After assembling the cooked pies in the same manner and analyzing their fillings, it was discovered that this was actually the case.

The Results

Here is a complete list of my tasting notes. Following that, I’ll talk about how taste plays a role.

Red Delicious

Flavor: Extremely sugary and one-dimensional in flavor. Texture: Mealy meat that becomes mushy after cooking. Skin is thick and bitter, and it might be difficult to eat. Although it may seem fine on the shop shelf for a long time, it is only truly delicious when it is plucked fresh.

Pie Rating (1–10): 1.Completely mushy, with a taste that is one-dimensional and overbearing in its sweetness. This reminded me of sour applesauce, which I dislike. The best way to consume it is out of hand, but only while it is still extremely fresh.

McIntosh

Sweet and moderately tangy, with a very white skin, this fruit has a unique flavor. Soft and somewhat gritty, the texture is delicate. Rating on a scale of 1–10: 3. It holds up better in pies than, for example, Red Delicious, although it still becomes brown and mushy when baked. Appetizers and eating out of hand are the best uses for this fruit.

Braeburn

Flavor: Extremely sweet and moderately tangy, with a distinct lemony fragrance reminiscent of Granny Smith apples (of which it is a descendant). When it is cooked, the flavor takes on a pear-like character. Texture: The texture is crisp and there isn’t much graininess. This texture appears to imply that the pectin structure is rather robust, which is consistent with the rest of the product. 7 out of 10 on the Pie Scale (1–10). Because of its density, it is able to soften completely while yet keeping a significant amount of texture when cooked into an apple pie or crumble.

This is a beautiful golden hue.

Rome

When eaten raw, the flavor is light and not very sweet; however, when cooked, the flavor becomes more complex. It has a thick skin and a hard meat, which gives it its distinctive texture. Despite the fact that it has a reputation for being a superb baking apple, I found it to be inappropriate. Rating on a scale of 1–10: 3. As it bakes, it gets a dark brown and becomes mushy. Sauce is the best use for this product.

Fuji

Quite sweet and fresh-tasting, with no cloying aftertaste. Texture: Crisp meat that retains its freshness for an extended period of time. In terms of moisture content and crunchiness, the texture is similar to that of a pear. 2. On a scale of 1–10, the pie rating is 2. The moderate flavor is not accentuated by the baking process. Watery, yet with a tangy aftertaste. The best application is when you’re eating out of hand.

See also:  How To Make A Cherry Pie Dessert

Golden Delicious

Sweet, tangy, and almost buttery, this flavor is a delight. When cooked, it becomes well-balanced and lusciously rich. Texture: Extremely fresh and crisp, but can get mealy if left on the tree for an extended period of time after harvest. When baked, it becomes softer while still retaining some of its texture. 8 out of 10 on the pie chart. This is the greatest flavor I was able to get from any single apple—this is exactly how apple pie should taste. It’s simply that I wish it were a little stiffer.

Cortland

Similar in flavor like a McIntosh, but considerably sweeter and tarter in flavor. Description: Its flesh is quite white, and it has a mild flavor, just like its relative. Soft and somewhat gritty, the texture is delicate. Rating on a scale of 1–10: 4. In terms of texture, it performs admirably in pies, softening without breaking down, but it falls short in terms of flavor. Appetizers and eating out of hand are the best uses for this fruit.

Empire

Very sweet and very tart, with a decent level of juiciness, this apple is a mix between the McIntosh and the Red Delicious, with tastes from both. Contrary to its tender/grainy ancestors, the texture of this vegetable is hard and crunchy.

Rating on a scale of 1–10: 3. When baked, it has a lovely texture, but it becomes cloyingly sweet because to the sugar content. However, although the acid is still present, it is insufficient to combat the high sugar level. The best application is when you’re eating out of hand.

Gala

This apple has a mild and sweet flavor with a hint of acidity. It is one of the most popular apples available because of its tiny size and high resistance to bruising and rotting. Texture: The skin is quite thin, and the texture is gritty. Rating on a scale of 1–10: 6. Even after baking, the texture retains its form, although the graininess can become overbearing. When it comes to pie apples, I want them to be soft and smooth in texture. The best application is when you’re eating out of hand.

Granny Smith

Very bright and acidic, with a pronounced citrus scent and white wine–like nose, its flavor is a delight. Texture: Extremely hard, crunchy, and slightly gritty in appearance. Rating on a scale of 1–10: 5. When it comes to cooking, it lasts virtually eternally. It has a pleasant brightness to it, but there is little apple taste to it. The best application is when you’re eating out of hand. Some perceptive readers may have detected the one notable exception to this rule: the following: Despite the fact that braeburns are low in acid, they bake up to be very firm.

  • It all comes down to the element of air.
  • It’s easy to tell if you drop one into a pail of water beside, say, a McIntosh: Braeburns will float to the surface considerably more slowly than McIntosh.) Apples that contain a lot of air may collapse on themselves throughout the cooking process, similar to a deflating balloon.
  • “A nice texture alone does not produce a delicious pie,” says the author.
  • However, good texture alone does not create a good pie.
  • Consider the following scenario: we blend some Granny Smiths with some Romes.
  • No, a single apple would have to enough for me, and the Golden Delicious and the Braeburn are the top contenders in this category, respectively.
  • As a result, I’m wondering whether there is anything I can do to improve the texture of the apples, given that both Golden Delicious and Braeburns have excellent, well-balanced flavors but neither is quite firm enough when baked.
  • Check out the last chapter in our pie-a-thon series, where I’ll explain how to make your apples into the greatest pie filling possible, for a more in-depth explanation.

Are In-Season Apples Better?

There are others who believe that the whole “local, seasonal” trend is getting out of hand, and I tend to agree with them on most occasions. However, there are some meals for which this is absolutely necessary. Apples for pies is one of those things. Remember that most apples are stored for a lengthy period of time if they are not purchased directly from an orchard or picked by hand during the fall harvest. Apples are preserved in temperature- and humidity-controlled facilities for up to ten months before being placed on grocery store shelves.

  1. If you buy an apple from the store in June, for example, it is quite likely that the fruit was picked in October.
  2. What is my recommendation?
  3. If you simply must have that spring or summer pie, search for apples that have been refrigerated and put them in your own refrigerator as soon as possible after purchasing them.
  4. What to do with the leftovers from 20 pies is a mystery.
  5. Please see author’s note below for more information.

In this section, we’ll discuss which apple cultivars have the consistency and flavor that we’re seeking for in a pie filling, based on scientific evidence.

Get The Recipes:

The traditional Thanksgiving dish of apple pie, perhaps our country’s most iconic dish, will make its annual appearance on many Thanksgiving tables this November as we gather with family and friends to celebrate the holiday. However, despite the fact that apple pie is a symbol of patriotism and is eaten to commemorate holidays ranging from the Fourth of July to Thanksgiving, the pie’s origins aren’t entirely American. A quick look at its history reveals that this dish has only come to represent the United States as a result of revisionism; furthermore, we may have overlooked the historical and cultural influences that have shaped its place in our country’s narrative in the process.

The History of Apple Pie

Apple pie, as we know it, did not originate in the United States of America; rather, it was formed in England as a result of culinary influences from France, the Netherlands, and even the Ottoman Empire. Apple trees, in reality, were not native to North America until the arrival of the European explorers. Only crab apples grew on the continent, and they were so little and sour that they were scarcely fit for consumption, let alone for baking. Indeed, many of the additional components required to make apple pie are sourced from countries other than the United States.

Important spices like as cinnamon and nutmeg, on the other hand, were sourced from far-flung locations such as Sri Lanka and Indonesia.

In terms of the meal itself, the British and the Dutch were making their own versions of apple pie long before the Declaration of Independence or before the first Thanksgiving was celebrated.

The question is, how did apple pie, a delicacy that was consumed centuries before the birth of America’s first president, come to be revered as an everlasting patriotic symbol?

The First Apple Pie Recipes

Pies were first made in Europe and then carried to the colonies by European settlers, who made them using the cultivated apples that they had brought to the continent. The meal immediately gained popularity. Not one, but two recipes for apple pie were included in America’s first cookbook, American Cookery, written by Amelia Simmons and originally published in 1796. The dish has been around since the colonial era and has survived through the 19th century and the American Civil War. According to John T.

Apple pie was a popular dish in American cuisine throughout the 18th and 19th centuries because it was simple, economical, and adaptable to a variety of tastes.

It was 1902 that a New York Timeseditorial asserted that pie had become “the American synonym for affluence,” and this was one of the earliest examples of this change to be found.

“There is no way to permanently defeat pie-eating individuals.” When The New York Times ran a story in 1926 with the headline “The Tourist Apple Pie Hunt Is Ended: American Army Abroad Has Failed Again to Find in Europe ‘the Kind They Make at Home,'” the dish was further established as a meal that was exclusive to the United States.

Is the apple pie truly a product of the United States? Photograph courtesy of Mark Weinberg

As American As Apple Pie

Similarly, the classic phrase “as American as apple pie” began to appear, albeit its exact origins are still a mystery. When a Gettysburg Timesadvertisement touted “New Lestz Suits that are as American as apple pie” in 1924, it was a pioneering example. Meanwhile, a 1928New York Timesarticle used the phrase “as American as apple pie or corn pone” to praise the homemaking talents of First Lady Lou Henry Hoover, referring to her ability to make “apple pie or corn pone.” In a short period of time, the allusion to corn pone or any other equally American meal was omitted, and the phrase “as American as apple pie” gained popularity, even being used to describe lynching by novelist Frank Shay.

Apple pie eventually came to be connected with the United States government, which was another influential factor in its myth-making as an American icon.

Following Oregon’s demonstration of supremacy by giving free apples to Congress, New York reacted by sending 75 apple pies to the Capitol Building.

Connecticut, irritated at having been left out of the argument, then stepped in, claiming that “apple pie produced by a Connecticut chef from Connecticut apples cannot be exceeded by apple pie cooked by a New York cook from New York apples!” Later, when the President was engaged, the dessert was elevated to even greater heights of patriotism.

“Apple pie was the President’s favorite among pies,” according to the White House, which also stated that it was “commonly acknowledged to be the All-American favorite.” With the onset of World War II came another opportunity for apple pie to establish its position as the undisputed national emblem of the United States.

  • Back home, a recipe for “Victory Apple Pie” was included in The Victory Binding of the American Woman’s Cook Book: Wartime Edition, which was issued to supply recipes that were modified to wartime rationing.
  • Davies in a film because, among other things, “his manners are as indigenously American as apple pie.” Meanwhile, The use of the term “indigenous” is particularly noteworthy since, as we all know, it was not even nearly accurate.
  • For example, in a November 1945 issue of The Louisville Times, culinary editor Marguerite T.
  • In addition, the coining of the phrase is noteworthy “The phrase “as American as motherhood and apple pie” helped the meal to become known as a symbol of female love and affection.
  • Apple pie became associated with a very specific American ideal as a result of these types of associations: it was healthful, hearty, pure, and noble in nature.
  • Because of this symbolism, it was implied that the meal was originally from the United States, a mindset that was reminiscent of an earlier history of deliberate denial of white colonization in the country.
  • But, in the end, does all of this imply that apple pie can’t be a national emblem for our country?
  • Apple pie became a national symbol in the United States.
  • It is true that apple pie represents American principles, despite its artificial iconography; nevertheless, this is not for the reasons one might expect.
  • American in that it symbolizes the way cultures and traditions from all over the globe have melded together to establish the reality of our national story.
  • According to John Lehndorff, president of the American Pie Council, “The phrase “as American as apple pie” refers to an item that was brought to the United States from another nation and developed into a uniquely American experience,” says the author.

In much the same way that a Greek immigrant running a burger joint or a Chilean refugee launching a fashion label or a Puerto Rican woman serving in Congress transcend national and cultural boundaries, a fruit that originated in Kazakhstan and is featured in an iconic British pastry and beloved by people across the United States does.

In the United States, cultural influences, histories, and customs of many groups who have made this nation their home have been woven together to form an extraordinarily diverse culture that is different from any other on the planet.

Epic Single Crust Apple Pie

Apple slices are shaped into the shape of a flowering rose bud and placed within a buttery pie crust for a contemporary take on a classic dessert in this recipe from Martha Stewart. Erin Jeanne McDowell, a recipe developer, transforms a basic apple pie into something even more wonderful by adding extra spices—ground cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and cloves, as well as dark brown sugar—to the mix.

Apple Pie

When it comes to apple pie, nothing beats a classic double-crust recipe, and this one is up there with the best. Just remember to serve it with a dollop of vanilla ice cream on the side! Are you interested in learning how to make a gorgeous golden brown crust? Before baking the crust in the oven, add a beaten egg to the bottom of the pan with a pastry brush.

Cider Caramel Apple Pie

“This filling is tangy, but it has a delicious creaminess to it since it is finished with butter,” says the chef. It’s a little sweet, but not too much. This pie recipe was devised by Erin Jeanne McDowell, a superb baker who utilized Honeycrisp apples, which hold up very well in baking, producing a filling that is supple yet still has a slight bite.

Vegan Apple Pie

This dairy-free apple pie is made entirely with plant-based ingredients. Instead of using actual butter, coconut oil and oat milk are used to make the pie crust, which results in a crust that is as rich and flaky as if it were cooked with real butter.

Brown Butter Apple Pie Cookies

These nutty cookies taste just like your favorite pie, but they’re easier to transport. Using brown butter, apple pieces are sautéed to create a rich filling that conjures all of the aromas and feelings associated with a classic fall dessert. While a few dashes of bitters are often reserved for classic cocktails such as the Old-Fashioned or the Manhattan, they also have a spicy flavor due to the presence of clove and cinnamon in the bitters. That, in our opinion, is the ideal accompaniment to tart apples.

Is apple pie considered an American dessert or not?

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