Who Created Dessert Pie

History of Pies

  • Walt McNamee/Corbis/Getty Images courtesy of Walt McNamee Perhaps we believe that making pies is a demanding task. The truth is that they are not difficult to make if you have a good recipe and a rolling pin. A excellent place to start is the new cookbook “365: A Year of Everyday Cooking and Baking” by Meike Peters, or you might try the Food52 website for some inspiration. A expert tip from baking writer David Lebovitz says that if the pastry splits before you add the filling, all you have to do is smooth up the gaps using a piece of dough that was set aside. According to some who are obsessive about the details, many of the pies served at Thanksgiving, such as pumpkin and pecan, are actually tarts, rather than traditional pies, because they only have a crust below and not a crust on top. When English immigrants first arrived in North America in the 17th century, they would have cooked their pies completely inside an outer shell made out of pastry called a “coffin,” which was frequently overly thick and difficult to cut through. In a similar way to a casserole dish, the coffin’s function was merely to protect the items within while they were being cooked. At the time, pies were more of a substantial dish laden with meat and numerous seasonings, including dried fruit, than they were a dessert. Because early pies tended to contain a mishmash of odd ingredients—some savory, some sweet—it is likely that the term pie derives from “magpie,” the bird that gathers a jumble of items. There is a recipe for an apple pie in Amelia Simmons’ “American Cookery,” the first cookbook written by an American and published in 1796. The pie is made using apples, sugar, cinnamon, wine, raisins, and a pound of cow’s tongue, among other ingredients. At Thanksgiving this year, I’m not sure how many people served that. Some of Simmons’ pie recipes, on the other hand, sound very delicious. We call it “Pompkin Pudding,” and it’s quite similar to our own pumpkin pie: a pint of stewed pumpkin is blended with eggs and spices like cinnamon and ginger before being baked in a pie shell. In the minds of people long after the gravy and side dishes have been forgotten, Thanksgiving pies have a way of surviving. According to Jennie June Croly’s “American Cookbook,” published in 1866, pies are “the festive part of supper.” By that time, the sweet pies that we are all familiar with and enjoy had become well-known. Croly provides recipes for custard pie and grape pie, rhubarb pie and coconut pie, cherry pie and lemon cream pie, as well as other desserts. She argues that pies should be “fruity in substance and fruity in flavor,” with a layer of crust that is not overly thick and a fruity filling. And she even went so far as to say that a man who didn’t enjoy pie shouldn’t be trusted. Even long after the gravy and side dishes have been forgotten, Thanksgiving pies seem to have a way of lingering in people’s minds. For Thanksgiving a couple of years ago, I cooked a lattice-topped vanilla-scented apple pie as well as a spiced pumpkin pie with cloves and cinnamon for my American nieces. Next year, I wanted to try something new, so I decided to create an orange and cardamom tart. In spite of this, my sister insisted that I must replicate last year’s pies exactly because the young ladies had been raving about them for weeks. The fact that this happened can’t be hidden from me (even though part of me really wanted to make and eat that orange tart). Unlike other desserts, pie is a special treat. It is an indication of attention to detail when it has a crust of buttery richness. The process of creating them is not difficult, but it does need the investment of time and attention, both of which are scarce commodities in most people’s life these days. An acquaintance meticulously and precisely crimps the edges of apple pie as if she were creating a lovely vase out of clay, pouring her heart and soul into the process. Being able to see it is hypnotic. I assume that the single most important reason why we don’t bake pies more frequently is that we believe we don’t have enough time on our hands. However, there is something about the systematic process of fitting pastry into a dish that may actually make you feel less harried and agitated than while you are preparing the meal (on the weekend, anyway). Almost all pie recipes call for you to let the pie cool for at least an hour before cutting into it. Obviously, the pastry is being discussed here. But suppose the phrase is also being used to refer to someone else. Dow JonesCompany, Inc. retains ownership of the copyright until 2021. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

A Brief History of Pie

Image courtesy of Wally McNamee/Corbis/Getty Images Perhaps we believe that pie-making is a tough task. However, if you have a rolling pin, a pie plate, and a solid recipe, they are not difficult to make. (“365: A Year of Everyday Cooking and Baking” by Meike Peters is a terrific place to start, as is the Food52 website.) If the pastry splits before you put the filling in, all you have to do is smooth up the holes using a piece of dough that has been set aside, according to baking blogger David Lebovitz’s advice.

During the 17th century, the pies prepared by English settlers would have been completely wrapped in a layer of pastry known as a “coffin,” which was frequently overly thick and difficult to consume.

  1. Pies were not often served as a dessert in those days, but rather as a substantial entrée containing meat and different ingredients, including dried fruit.
  2. In “American Cookery,” written by Amelia Simmons and published in 1796, there is a recipe for a pie made with apples, sugar, cinnamon, wine, raisins, and a pound of cow’s tongue.
  3. On the other hand, several of Simmons’ pie recipes seem very delectable.
  4. In the minds of people long after the gravy and side dishes are forgotten, Thanksgiving pies have a way of lingering.
  5. Croly provides recipes for custard pie and grape pie, rhubarb pie and coconut pie, cherry pie and lemon cream pie, among other desserts.
  6. She even went so far as to warn that a man who did not enjoy pie could not be trusted.
  7. For Thanksgiving a couple of years ago, I cooked a lattice-topped vanilla-scented apple pie as well as a pumpkin pie flavored with cloves and cinnamon for my American nieces.

My sister, on the other hand, insisted that I prepare the pies precisely the same as I did the year before because the girls had been raving about them for weeks.

A pie isn’t just any dessert; it’s an art form.

Making them is not difficult, but it does need the investment of time and attention, both of which are in short supply in most of our lives.

It’s hypnotic to watch.

However, there is something about the painstaking process of putting pastry into a dish that may actually make you feel less harried and worried (on the weekend, anyway).

Most pie recipes include the advice to “rest for at least an hour.” It’s a reference to the pastry, but what if it’s a reference to you? Dow JonesCompany, Inc. reserves all rights to the content of this website. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

Pie•ology: A Full Filling Story

Kate Greenaway’s novel A apple pie is depicted on the cover (1900) Season for pies is here, and I bet that you will be baking or purchasing a pie at some point in the near future. There is something about this wonderful delicacy that brings back childhood memories for many of us, and we have no qualms about expressing our opinions on which pie is the greatest. Every Thanksgiving, I recall my mother cooking me a chocolate cream pie from scratch because I dislike pumpkin pie. It was my favorite pie growing up (I know this is sacrilegious).

In 1378, King Richard II of England passed an edict regulating pie pricing in the city of London.

Along with it, cook a hearty soup and bake a pie.

Pie, according to the Concise Oxford English Dictionary (2008), is “a baked dish of savory or sweet ingredients enclosed in or topped with dough that is cooked in the oven.” An abridged definition of pie from the Oxford American Dictionary of Current English (1999) is “a baked dish of fruit (or meat), custard (or custard-like mixture), etc., usually with top and base of pastry or anything matching the shape of a pie (such as a mud pie).” In the United States, the term “pie” is used somewhat loosely to denote a baked dish that is either open or closed (with a crust on top).

  1. The British, on the other hand, consider an open-faced pie (usually filled with fruit, preserves, or custard) to be a tart rather than a pie.
  2. Our savory meat pies and dessert pies are also available in a variety of flavors, and we also offer pocket pies.
  3. Pasties, turnovers, empanadas, and calzones are some of the names we often associate with these pocket pies.
  4. The ancient Greeks consumed pie (artocreas), however it was of the savory variety, consisting of meat in a pastry shell that could be opened.
  5. The recipe for placenta (flat cake) in De Agri Cultura by Marcus Porcius dates back to the 2nd Century (BCE).
  6. A delicious thick mixture of goat cheese, honey, and layers of pastry dough (tracta) with a bottom and top crust, according to various translations, was encased within the pastry dough (tracta).
  7. Cherry pie was a favorite dessert of Elizabeth I, according to legend.

In a chapter devoted to pastry, the Opera of Bartolomeo Scappi (1570) also provides various recipes for crostate (pie/tart), including meat and fruit crostate (pie/tart).

Four and Twenty BlackbirdsBaked in a PieA Pocketful of RyeFour and Twenty BlackbirdsBaked in a Pie When the Pie was cut open, the birds immediately began to sing.

I assumed it was just a nursery song at first: how could one bake living birds in a pie, after all?

It was not until the Accomplisht Cook (1671) that a recipe for Live Birds in a Pie was published that both live birds and frogs were included in the recipe.

Browse through the current crop of cookbooks, and you will discover entire chapters devoted to these meals.

FSA/OWI Collection photograph of pumpkin pies and Thanksgiving feast from 1940.

Sweeteners such as maple syrup, cane sugar, molasses, and honey were more readily available to cooks as the country developed in population and wealth (the Dutch and English imported honey bees to the U.S.).

It is in Amelia Simmon’s American Cookery(1796), the earliest American cookbook, that a recipe for “Pumpkin Pudding,” which must be baked in a pie crust, is found.

As a result, New England became known as the “pie belt,” and with good reason.

As the country progressed westward, new ingredients emerged and regional specialities began to take shape.

By the mid-19th century, rhubarb, sometimes known as pie plant, is being used in a variety of dishes.

This cookbook, edited by the ladies of Plymouth Church in Des Moines, Iowa (1876), features a range of pie recipes, including coconut, cream, custard (custard pie), lemon (lemon curd pie), and even vinegar pie (vinegar pie).

In fact, pie was deemed unfit for consumption.

These articles were written by Mrs.

In addition, with the widespread use of home refrigerators, chilled pie recipes such as Black Bottom Pie, which is served chilled, gained in popularity.

These days, we are uncovering our pie-making roots and getting back to the fundamentals of pie-making.

Everyone has a pie-related tale, and we would appreciate it if you would share yours with us as well.

In addition, I’d like to thank my smart partner for coming up with the title for this piece, which is Pieology: A Full Filling Story.

The ‘Pie Engineer’ Who Designed a Dessert For the Jazz Age

Kate Greenaway’s novel A apple pie has an illustration on the front cover (1900) Autumn has here, and I anticipate that you will be baking or purchasing a pie in the not-too-distant future. There is something about this wonderful delicacy that brings back childhood memories for many of us, and we have no qualms with expressing our opinions on which pie is the greatest in our opinion. When I think of pie, I recall my mother cooking me my own personal chocolate cream pie every Thanksgiving because I do not care for pumpkin pie (I know this is sacrilegious).

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Pie prices in London were regulated by an edict issued by King Richard II in 1378, according to the British Historical Society.

Kate Greenaway’s A apple pie is depicted in this illustration (1900) Several countries, particularly the United Kingdom and the United States, have disagreed on what constitutes a pie definition.

An abridged definition of pie from the Oxford American Dictionary of Current English (1999) is “a baked dish of fruit (or meat), custard (or custard-like mixture), etc., usually with top and base of dough or anything matching the shape of a pie (a mud pie).” When describing an open or closed (crust on top) baked dish, many of us in the United States use the term “pie” quite loosely.

  1. When it comes to pie, there is an overwhelming selection and diversity to choose from.
  2. Making these small hand pies is as simple as folding the dough over the filling and baking them.
  3. Traditional pies date back to ancient Egypt and Greece, according to history.
  4. A pie with a top and bottom crust may have been invented by the Romans for the first time.
  5. According to legend, one of the oldest recipes for a closed pie was written by Cato (Cato the Elder).
  6. Most historians believe it was the people of 16th-century England who brought delicious fruit pies and tarts to widespread favor.
  7. There is a Proper Newe Booke of Cokerye that has recipes for fruit pies (tarts) made from cheryes (cherries) and strawberyes (strawberries) (1575).

Drawings from the Song of Sixpence Picture Book (1909) There is a nursery rhyme that many of you may be acquainted with: Play the sixpenny harp and sing a song about sixpenny.

What a dainty dish to place in front of the King.

According to what I found out, kings and the higher class would ask their cooks to construct extravagant pies that contained live animals in order to dazzle guests.

During the 17th century, sweet pies and tarts had become widely available.

Examples include the 1694 edition of The Compleat Cook: or, the Whole Art of Cookery, which has a chapter on “Tarts of all Lozts.” Similar to this is William Rabisha’s The Whole Body of Cookery Dissected, which contains a chapter titled “All Manners of Tarts” (1682).

Pie-making was common practice in colonial America.

Pumpkin, apple, pear, quince, and blueberry pies were popular among early settlers.

Pumpkin pie was invented in this country, and this is one of the very earliest recipes for it.

A new generation of ingredients and regional specialities arose as the country expanded westward.

We can witness the usage of rhubarb, often known as pie plant, in recipes as early as the mid-nineteen hundreds.

This cookbook, edited by the ladies of Plymouth Church in Des Moines, Iowa (1876), features a variety of pie recipes, including coconut, cream, custard (custard pie), lemon (lemon curd pie), and even vinegar pie (vinagar pie)!

It was really declared illegal to eat pie.

Mrs.

In addition, with the widespread use of home refrigerators, chilled pie dishes such as Black Bottom Pie, which is served cold, became increasingly popular.

These days, we are revisiting our pie-making roots and getting back to the fundamentals of pie-making techniques.

It seems as though everyone has a pie story, and we would appreciate it if you would share yours with us as well.

Our culinary specialist Allison Kelly was instrumental in making this blog article feasible, as she assisted me in finding fantastic dishes to include in it. This essay would not have been possible without the help of my creative partner, who came up with the title Pieology: A Full Filling Story.

50 of Our Best Pie Recipes, from Classics to New Favorites

When I make a toasted coconut cream pie, my family goes crazy and the pie disappears in an instant. Darlene Bartos of Shoreview, Minnesota, sent in this message. 2/50

Lemony Sweet Potato Pie

I resort to this light and delectable sweet potato pie, which is flavored with just a dash of lemon for a finger-licking finish to any holiday feast. People always seem to have space for this delicious dessert, which is amusing to observe. Peggy West of Georgetown, Delaware, sent in this message. 4/50

Irresistible Coconut Cream Pie

My husband and I cultivate 500 acres of wheat on the family farm that his ancestors established in 1889. I make my own flour and enjoy using it in recipes like this one. The crust, which is simple to make and pat in, has a deep grain taste. A decadent coconut cream filling and a fluffy meringue on top make this dessert appealing. The following is a letter from Roberta Foster of Kingfisher, Oklahoma: 5/50

Deep-Dish Apple Pie

In 1889, his family homesteaded the land where my husband and I now cultivate 500 acres of wheat. The flour I use in this recipe is freshly ground by myself, and I adore using it. There is a deep grain taste to the simple pat-in crust. With a creamy coconut filling and a fluffy meringue on top, it’s hard to resist this dessert! The following is a testimonial from Roberta Foster of Kingfisher, Oklahoma: 5/50

Easy Confetti Pie

When you combine a bright, creamy no-bake confetti filling with a sugar cone crust, you get a pie that tastes like birthday cake. —Gina Nistico, Taste of Home Food Editor7 out of 50 points

Banana Cream Pie

This pie, which was made using our farm-fresh dairy products, was a delectable creamy treat that Mom offered whenever she felt like it. Her recipe is a true gem, and I have yet to come across one that is even somewhat comparable. —Bernice Morris from Marshfield, Missouri. 8/50

Sour Cream Peach Pecan Pie

The cream pie, which was made using our farm-fresh dairy products, was a delectable creamy delicacy that Mom offered whenever she wanted. Her recipe is a true gem, and I have yet to come across one that is even even close to it in taste. —Bernice Morris from Marshfield, Missouri 8/50

County Fair Cherry Pie

This cherry pie is really simple to make! Due to my dual career as a teacher and a Navy wife, ease of preparation and speed of preparation are essential in our household. — Claudia Youmans lives in Virginia Beach, and she is a writer. With these crucial pie baking utensils, you can bake success right into your pies. 10/50

Peanut Butter Cream Pie

Having a fluffy, no-bake peanut butter pie on hand during the summer months is a welcome treat. This pie comes together in minutes. This pie, which is bursting with flavor, is devoured even after a heavy dinner! The writer, JesseAnne Foust, of Bluefield, West Virginia 11/50

Easy Fresh Strawberry Pie

Instead of making a cake for my mother’s birthday, I decided to make this strawberry pie recipe. Because it was the middle of May in Oklahoma, the berries were in peak condition. It was a special event for the entire family, according to Josh Carter of Birmingham, Alabama. 12/50

Cape Cod Blueberry Pie

It has been a tradition in the Northeast since the 18th century to make this pie.

Little wild blueberries and heavy cream would have been used by the settlers to garnish their dessert. I feel the same way. Nancy O’Connell of Biddeford, Maine, contributed to this article. 13/50

Ginger-Streusel Pumpkin Pie

I enjoy baking and have spent a significant amount of time creating treats for my family and friends. The streusel topping adds a particular touch to this pie that your family will appreciate. —Sonia Parvu, Sherrill & Company, New York City 14/50

Citrus Cranberry Pie

Make this stunning pie with a lattice top to show off the abundance of cranberries in the fall. A dollop of orange cream adds a touch of sweetness to the slightly sour taste. —Taste of Home Cooking Demonstration Kitchen Are you new to pie baking? You can find all of the techniques and tricks you need to make a beautiful pie in our comprehensive pie baking guide. 15/50

Marshmallow-Almond Key Lime Pie

In the summer, Key limes are at their ripest, which is essential for this pie’s characteristic sweet-tart flavor. Because it has a silky marshmallow top layer, which distinguishes it as a dessert crowd favorite, mine is different from other Key lime pies. Mrs. Judy Castranova of New Bern, North Carolina 16/50

Frosty Peanut Butter Pie

Even though it contains only a handful of ingredients, this peanut butter pie is sure to garner plenty of well-deserved praise. It seems like every time I bring this creamy, make-ahead pie to a gathering, someone asks me for the recipe. Christina Gillentine from Tulsa, Oklahoma, sent in this message: 17/50

Strawberry/Rhubarb Crumb Pie

Everyone in Maine appears to have an arhubarb patch, which is strange. This pie took first place in our church’s fair, and I hope it will be a hit at your house as well! — Paula Phillips of East Winthrop, Maine, submitted this entry. 18/50

Pecan Pie Bars

In Maine, it appears like everyone has an arhubarb patch. In our church fair, this pie took first place; maybe it will do well in your home as well. — Paula Phillips of East Winthrop, Maine, was born in the United States. 18/50

Apple Crumble Pie

In Maine, it seems like everyone has an arhubarb patch. This pie took first place in our church fair, and I hope it will be a hit at your house as well! — Paula Phillips of East Winthrop, Maine, submitted this photo. 18/50

Juicy PeachStrawberry Crumb Pie

There has been peach pie, strawberry pie, and maybe even peach-strawberry pie in your life. Add some fresh basil from the garden, and you’re in for a genuine treat. Give it a go. Lindsey Sprunk from Noblesville, Indiana sent this in: 21/50

Chocolate Raspberry Pie

There has been peach pie, strawberry pie, and perhaps even peach-strawberry pie in your life. However, if you add some garden-fresh basil, you’re in for a true treat. Please give it a go! Noblesville, Indiana’s Lindsay Sprunk provided this response. 21/50

Sugar Cream Pie

Indiana sugar cream pie is one of my favorite desserts, and I really enjoy the one that my grandmother makes for me. Here in the Midwest, we call it “Hoosier” sugar cream pie and serve it warm or chilled. Laura Kipper, of Westfield, Indiana, sent in this message. 23/50

Rhubarb Cheese Pie

Sugar cream pie, particularly the one that my grandmother baked for me, is one of my all-time favorite treats. Our version, called “Hoosier” sugar cream pie, can be served warm or chilled. Westfield, Indiana resident Laura Kipper shared her thoughts. 23/50

Spiced Plum Pie

In this soothing pie, the gentle flavors of orange and nutmeg bring out the fresh flavor of plums to their best advantage.

While the pie is still warm, enjoy a slice with a scoop of Vanilla Ice Cream to complete the experience. New Yorker Lucille Mead resides in the town of Ilion. 25/50

Contest-Winning German Chocolate Pie

Thanksgiving dinner at our house often involves 25 guests and a variety of pies from which to choose. There’s nothing quite like the flavor of German chocolate cake in this one. After trying it, a buddy assured me that it would become his go-to birthday pie from now on. Debbie Clay from Farmington, New Mexico sent us this message: 26/50

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Chocolate Cheesecake Pie

This delicious yet easy pie is a perennial favorite among guests. Fresh raspberries or cherry pie filling are some of my favorite toppings. Brooklyn, NY27/50 Sandy Schwartz is a freelance writer.

Tart Cherry Lattice Pie

When my mother is invited to a gathering or potluck, everyone asks for her handmade double-crust fruit pies, which she makes herself. In the summer, she makes this dish with fresh tart cherries from the orchard. A slice of chocolate cake topped with vanilla ice cream is one of my favorite desserts. PAMELA EATON, a resident of Monclova, Ohio 28/50

Perfect Rhubarb Pie

Nothing can disguise the sour rhubarb flavor in this delicious pie, which has the perfect combination of sweetness and tartness. Serving this dessert as a way to mark the end of winter is a pleasant gesture. The writer, Ellen Benninger, of Greenville, Pennsylvania 29/50

Sugar and Spice Pear Pie

Pear pie is a favorite of my family since it is a little less tart than apple pie. —Kristina Pontier, Hillsboro, Oregon31/50 The nutty crust pairs well with the soft fruit and buttery pastry.

Raspberry Pie Squares

Even while it may appear difficult, this crowd-pleasing pie recipe will make it doable. Sweet and tangy raspberry filling complements a flaky handmade pastry well, creating a delicious dessert. — Taste of Home Test Kitchen scored 33 out of 50 points.

Chocolate Silk Pie

In addition to melting in your mouth, this creamy, fast chocolate pie will melt any and all resistance to dessert! What a simple and effective method to express your feelings on Valentine’s Day. • Mary E. Relyea lives in Canastota, New York. 34/50

Frozen Grasshopper Pie

Whenever I first started playing with cream pies, I thought this would be the perfect dish to prepare for a family of chocolate enthusiasts. I was correct in my guess. Traditionally, this pie is offered as an adult New Year’s Eve dessert, although some people have also served it as a Christmas dessert after the kids have gone to bed. The following is a contribution from Lorraine Caland of Shuniah, Ontario:35/50

Candy Apple Pie

This is the only apple pie that my husband would eat, which is OK with me because he prepares it on a regular basis, just as I do. We serve it as the finishing touch to our holiday feasts from New Year’s Day to Christmas Day, and it tastes similar to a blend of apple and pecan pie. Cindy Kleweno of Burlington, Colorado, contributed to this article. 36/50

Red, White and Blue Berry Pie

This brightly colored pie is, in my opinion, the embodiment of summer. The pie is decorated with bright blueberries and raspberries that are sandwiched between layers of cream cheese. Without this delectable dessert, I can’t fathom hosting a Christmas party! In Anchorage, Alaska, Cindy Zarnstrrff writes: 37/50

Creamy Banana Pecan Pie

When you serve this tiered banana masterpiece, you’ll receive a flurry of praises.

Due to the fact that the filling is made using instant pudding mix, it is quite simple to put together. In Anchorage, Alaska, Isabel Fowler writes: 38/50

Grits Pie

People who are not fans of grits are sure to enjoy this pie since it is simple, southern, and delectably delicious. It has the appropriate custardy texture to go with the custard flavor. Victoria Hudson of Pickens, South Carolina wrote this. 39/50

Maple Sugar Pumpkin Pie

Despite the fact that some people loathe grits, this pie is straightforward, southern, and delicious. It has the appropriate custardy texture to go with the chocolate flavor. Victoria Hudson, from Pickens, South Carolina 39/50

Fluffy Key Lime Pie

This no-bake pie will transport you to a tropical paradise. It’s low in fat, sugar, and hassle, and it tastes great. This is, without a doubt, the finest Key lime pie recipe ever! • Frances VanFossen from Warren, Michigan. 41/50

Mocha Java Pie with Kahlua Cream

This no-bake pie will transport you to paradise. Fat, sugar, and hassle are all kept to a minimum. This Key lime pie recipe is without a doubt the greatest there is! • Frances VanFossen from Warren, Michigan 41/50

Florida Citrus Meringue Pie

Why restrict yourself to just one type of citrus fruit when you can make a magnificent dessert out of them all? Because of the addition of orange and lemon, this delicious pie has a strong sweet-tart flavor! Barra Carlucci, of Orange Park, Florida says: 43/50

Double-Crust Strawberry Pie

This pie was really delicious the first time I made it, and I wanted to share it with you. The combination of fresh strawberries dusted with cinnamon results in a delectable pie that may be served warm or slightly cooled. Lake Zurich, Illinois resident Patricia Kutchins sent in this message: 44/50

Silky Chocolate Pie

Chocolate is responsible for the rotation of the earth! The chocolate pie tradition runs deep in our family, and this variation, made with a dab of brandy, is silky and oh, so unique. Kathy Hewitt, of Cranston, Rhode Island, sent this response. 45/50

Toffee Ice Cream Pie

My sister’s recipe was the inspiration for this dish, which I adapted to save time in the kitchen. There’s no mistake about it, you’ll want another helping.” Janell Greisen is a resident of San Dimas, California. 46/50

Rhu-berry Pie

My sister’s recipe was the inspiration for this dish, which I tweaked to save time in the kitchen. With little doubt, you’ll want to order another round.” Janell Greisen resides in San Dimas, California and is a freelance writer. 46/50

Easy Crunch Berry Pie

This is a new and straightforward technique to preparing a pie that is worthy of serving to guests. The whimsical Cap’n Crunch cereal crust is a delight to bite into, and it’s the ideal match to the no-bake mixed berry filling in this recipe. —Taste of Home Test Kitchen48 out of 50 stars

Apple Pie

I recall returning home after a softball game dejected one day. We had lost the game. “Perhaps a taste of my handmade apple pie would make you feel better,” Grandma said, in her infinite wisdom. Grandma was correct after all it took was one mouthful. If you want to learn how to create homemade apple pie filling, this is the one and only recipe you will ever require. Granite Falls, Washington49/50 —Maggie Greene, Granite Falls

Honey Pecan Pie

We’d lost a softball game, and I remember walking home dejected afterward. “Perhaps a taste of my handmade apple pie would make you feel better,” Grandma advised, based on her experience.

Grandma was absolutely correct after only one taste. In order to learn how to create homemade apple pie filling, this is the only recipe you will ever require. Granite Falls, Washington49/50 —Maggie Greene —

Cranberry-Almond Apple Pie

I recall going home from a softball game dejected after we’d lost. “Perhaps a bite of my handmade apple pie would help you feel better,” Grandma said. After just one mouthful, Grandma was proven correct. If you want to learn how to create homemade apple pie filling, this is the only recipe you’ll need. Granite Falls, Washington49/50 —Maggie Greene

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How Pie Got Its Name

Welcome to Eat Your Words, a series in which we delve into the murky origins of the food-related terms we know and use every day. Maggie, get the hell out of here! It’s true that the word “pie,” like its crust, is composed of only three ingredients—p,i, ande for the former; butter, flour, and water for the latter—but its seeming simplicity is misleading. An entire metaphorical flight to rival the creepy coconut is compressed into one single phrase, and it all starts with a bird. A magpie was called a “pie” before it was called a pastry, and the term “pie” came from the Latin word for the bird, Pica (whence the name of the disorder thatmakes you eat weird things).

Several brief trips over the English Channel (and the French conquest of England) later, and the name “pie” was adopted as the English word for the large black bird.

No one knows for certain how or why the name “magpie” evolved to mean “a baked product stuffed with things,” but there is enough historical evidence to support the notion that it did happen, and that it was based on a quirk of the magpie personality: magpies are notorious hoarders of all kinds of items.

The term “pastry” was used to describe a crusty dish that included just one element at the time of this bird-to-bakery shift, whereas “pie” was used to describe a crusty thing that contained a variety of meats, fruits, or whatever.

Hula Pie

All right, it’s past time for you to learn about Kimo’s Original Hula Pie®. Originally created at Kimo’s many years ago, this dish has continued to please even the most ardent dessert connoisseurs ever since. Using Kimo’s favorite macadamia nut ice cream, she builds a tower of the dessert on top of a chocolate cookie crust, which she then decorates with chocolate fudge, whipped cream, and more macadamia nuts.

It is small enough to be shared, yet it is seldom left unfinished! Come on in and get a slice of pizza. Despite having originated at Kimo’s, Hula Pie has become a favorite at all of our locations. Aloha!

How to eat a Hula Pie

Take a good look at it. When confronted with a circumstance like this, choosing your perspective is critical. Turn it on its side to see what happens. Even if it’s beautiful when you first see it, you must consume it quickly. Allow each flavor to be recognized. It takes a lot of taste to get through a dark chocolate cookie crust, macadamia nut ice cream, thick fudge sauce, macadamia nuts, and whipped cream. Bring it to a close! Don’t be intimidated; whether you’re in a group or on your own, finishing is rewarding (and extremely doable) if you put in the effort.

Here’s Every Classic Pie Recipe You’ll Ever Need

The addition of a handmade pie to any special event is a pleasant sight. It doesn’t matter if it’s a warm and comforting apple pie for an autumn meal or a cool slice of ice cream pie for a summer dessert, pie is unquestionably one of our favorite desserts. To help you out, we’ve put together a list of the greatest pie recipes you can bake (or not bake—there are plenty of no-bake alternatives on our list, too) at any point of the year. Take, for example, Thanksgiving desserts: here’s your one-stop shop for classic favorites like pumpkin pie and ooey, gooey pecan pie, both of which are available year round.

For pies made with fresh strawberries, cherries, or blueberries, gather them yourself during the warmer months and bake them in your favorite summer recipes.

Graham cracker crust, all-butter pie crust, puff pastry, and Ree Drummond’s Perfect Pie Crust are some of the simple pie crusts you can make in a matter of minutes.

Sweet pie recipes

Items 1 through 24 out of 27 shown

Pearberry pie

  • A five-star rating out of five is given. 2 out of 5 stars This gorgeous dessert with a decorative top will wow your dinner guests when you combine two classic desserts – poached pears and a fruit pie.
See also:  How To Make Dessert With Pizza Pie Crust

Banoffee pie

  • A rating of 4.8 stars out of a possible 5.10 stars With buttery pastry and delicious dulce de leche, this recipe is a simple family favorite. It is recommended that you serve the dish with a big dollop of cream.

Choc chip pecan pie

  • A five-star rating out of a possible five-star rating With buttery crust and a gooey center, this decadent chocolate and pecan delicacy is something everyone will enjoy.

Gooseberrycustard pies

  • A five-star rating out of a possible five-star rating A delicate vanilla custard and filo pastry are combined to create this summer treat, which has slightly tangy gooseberries.

Sweet potato pie

  • A star rating of 0 out of a possible 5 stars. With this pie, you may put the attention on sweet potatoes. The velvety potatoes are a perfect match for the filling, which is enclosed in a flaky shortcrust pastry and baked until golden.

Salted caramelhazelnut banoffee pie

  • A rating of 0 stars out of a possible 5 stars. With this pie, you may draw attention to the deliciousness of sweet potatoes. It’s the creamy potatoes that make the filling so delicious, and it’s all wrapped up in a flaky shortcrust pastry.

Maple, bananapecan pop pies

  • A star rating of 0 out of a possible 5 stars. With a sprinkling of colorful frosting and a generous dollop of thick double cream or custard, these sweet and nutty little fruit pies will be a hit.

Peach melba pop pies

  • A rating of 0 stars out of a possible 5 stars. With a sprinkling of colorful frosting and a generous dollop of thick double cream or custard, these sweet and nutty tiny fruit pies are a delicious dessert.

Seville meringue pie with pomegranate

  • A star rating of 0 out of a possible 5 stars. This decadent pie with pomegranate topping is a magnificent seasonal dish, thanks to the fluffy meringue on top and the tangy Seville oranges below.

Pecan mince pie

  • A rating of 0 stars out of a possible 5 stars. This decadent pie with pomegranate topping is a magnificent seasonal dish, thanks to its fluffy meringue on top and tangy Seville oranges below.

Best ever pumpkin pie with stem ginger cream

  • A rating of 4.8 stars out of a possible 5.11 stars With the addition of stem ginger cream and pumpkin seed brittle, this classic American dessert is elevated to the level of a dinner party feast.

Plummarzipan pie

  • A 4.5-star rating out of a possible 5-star rating To finish off a spectacular supper, top this deep pink pie filling with a lattice crust made of buttery sweet shortcrust pastry for a show-stopping presentation.

Fig, raspberrycardamom pie

  • A five-star rating out of a possible five-star rating An exotic fruit filling, enhanced by Middle-Eastern flavors like as rosewater and cardamom, makes for a stunning dessert for a dinner party.

Bramleyblackberry pie

  • A 4.4-star rating out of a possible 5-star rating Apple and blackberry pie, topped with our most delicious sweet shortcrust pastry, makes the most of delicious seasonal fruit.

Apple pie

  • A four-star rating out of a possible five-star rating Children will delight in helping to prepare and devour this cozy, traditional fruity pudding prepared with handmade shortcrust pastry.

Lighter applepear pie

  • A 4.7-star rating out of a possible 5-star rating Make a low-fat variation of this traditional family recipe. Filo pastry is light and crunchy, and it helps to thicken up the filling by including pears.

Pearblackberry crostata

  • A star rating of 0 out of a possible 5 stars. Traditionally made with shortcrust pastry and a lattice of sweet, ripe fruit, this pie is best served warm, accompanied by lots of custard, cream, or ice cream.

Gooseberry pie

  • A five-star rating out of five is given. 2 out of 5 stars Because this traditional British pie is so straightforward, it is well worth the effort to make your own dough. When served warm, all it need is a drizzle of custard or a scoop of ice cream to complete the dish.

St Clement’s pie

  • A 4.3-star rating out of a possible 5.14 stars. a very British variant of Key lime pie, consisting of a delicious, creamy dessert filled with acidic orange and lemon juice

Summer berry pie

  • A 4.4-star rating out of a possible 5.15 stars. Make use of the summer’s harvest of delicious berries to create this family favorite
  • All you need is cream.

Blackberryapple pie

  • A 4.3-star rating out of a possible 5-star rating Make use of any remaining seasonal fruit by baking a delicious blackberry and apple pie. This classic dessert dish is ideal for an autumnal family treat over the holidays.

Cherry crumble pies

  • A star rating of 4.8 out of a possible maximum of 5.5 stars Served with custard or clotted cream, these crumble pies demand to be topped with a dab of whipped cream. One is simply insufficient

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How to Make a Pie Dessert Bar!

Take a conventional pie and transform it into a sampling meal that is easy to serve. Your guests will appreciate having several delectable, portioned pie alternatives available at your next gathering so they may try more than one type of pie without feeling stuffed! In a typical year, how many Christmas events does your family host or attend is a good question. Already, our schedule is jam-packed with dinners and parties that we can’t wait to attend over the months of November and December. We host a considerable number of those get-togethers, and Bob and I always have a good time coming up with culinary ideas.

  • We bring back old favorites while also introducing a few of new ones.
  • We enjoy being innovative and trying out new ideas.
  • Due to the fact that everyone is generally filled from dinner, it is difficult to arrange a dessert that everyone will enjoy.
  • What is our favorite dessert?
  • PIE, you’re quite correct.
  • At the supermarket, we were able to discover a variety of various frozen pies to choose from.
  • The Southern Pecan just has to be defrosted before serving; the other two desserts must be made in advance of dessert time, though.
  • As we strolled through the grocery store aisles, the ideas for our pie bar began to take shape.

We knew we needed something that looked exciting, welcoming, tasty, and easy to make. But what exactly did we want? We purchased some cute tiny blackboard signs to designate our pie selections, as well as some sampling-sized clear glasses to use as sampling cups.

The Pie Bar Starts Taking Shape!

Here is a list of all of the materials we had to deal with: See how we put up this amazingly delicious, tremendously welcoming, really REALLY SUPER CUTE pie dessert bar in the photos below! Every cup was filled with a different type of pie, basically. With a circle cutter, we created two circles of pie for each cup in which we served the Southern Pecan Pie. There is a pastry crust on the Razzleberry Pie, and once again, the circular cutter came in helpful. We begin by cutting the crust into round shapes and setting them aside.

  • A circle of crust was placed on top of each cup as a finishing touch.
  • We scraped off as much of the crumb topping as we could from this pie and saved it away for later use.
  • I have to admit, the ultimate result was just mouthwateringly amazing!
  • I wish you and your family the happiest of holidays and a prosperous New Year.
  • Describe your must-have pie flavors for holiday entertaining in the comments section below.
  • You might also be interested in these other posts.

A Pie’s Place in History

For thousands of years, pie, which is roughly described as an uncooked crusty shell filled with a variety of baked ingredients, has been a staple of practically every civilization throughout history, and it continues to be so today.

6,000’s B.C.

Pies are believed to have originated in ancient Egypt, maybe as early as the Neolithic Age. As soon as people began to use blunt instruments, grains such as oats, barley, and rye were crushed down, filled with honey, and cooked over hot embers to produce an early kind of pie known as a “galette.” This early form of pie is still in existence today. These galettes were popular, and they would go on to be the most common type of pie manufactured for more than 4,000 years.

1300’s B.C.

In the course of a few thousand years of practice, Egyptian cooks learnt to include more ingredients into their galettes, such as nuts and fruits, bringing their masterpieces one step closer to the pies we know and love today. It was the ancient Greeks who first used flourwater dough to wrap around meats, and it was them who introduced the rest of the world to this type of pastry. And when the Romans invaded Greece, they carried on the tradition, even expanding it to include oysters, mussels, and eels baked in a flaky shell and presented at the end of each course of a meal, among other things.

1500’s A.D.

As we moved from the previous side of the calendar to the present side, pies began to take on a shape that was more recognizable to us today. Pies were particularly convenient to create for sharing because of the substantial crust beneath them, which acted as a plate or dish as well as a component of the meal itself.

As baking techniques and processes continued to develop, it became increasingly usual to flavor and sweeten the crust as well.

Animated Pies

During the thirteenth through sixteenth centuries, pies took an unusual turn when “animated pies” were popular among the European nobility. For reasons that will become clear later, these pies (which were cooked first but served cold for reasons that will also become clear later) included live animals and, in some cases, people concealed under the top crust. When the pie was initially carved, it was rumored that everything from birds to turtles to rabbits would spring forth from the pie to the delight of the royal court’s visitors.

1600’s A.D.

It was around the seventeenth century that pies began to take on the shape we know them today. Laborers in England and Ireland were fed on meat pies such as Shephard’s Pie and Cottage Pie. And when the Pilgrims carried these customs with them to the Americas, they began to integrate other fruits that Native Americans had pointed out to them as well.

1700’s A.D.

From Chicken Pot Pies to Sweetbread Pies with Oysters, America’s pioneer families continued to include pie in their meals, whether it was a sweetbread pie or a savory chicken pot pie. The exact components varied depending on where they lived, but with wheat being a readily available commodity, it appears that making a crust in which to house them was one of our nation’s early culinary traditions. Some claim that Martha Washington herself was known for making one of the greatest pies in the area.

1800’s A.D.

From Chicken Pot Pies to Sweetbread Pies with Oysters, America’s pioneer families continued to include pie in their meals in various shapes and sizes. The exact components varied depending on where they lived, but with wheat being a readily available commodity, it appears that making a crust to contain them was one of our nation’s early traditions. Indeed, Martha Washington herself was reputed to have created one of the greatest pies in the area.

1900’s – Today

Pies of various varieties remained a mainstay of the meals of America’s pioneer families, from Chicken Pot Pies to Sweetbread Pies with Oysters. The exact components varied depending on where they lived, but with wheat being a readily available product, it appears that making a crust in which to house them was one of our nation’s early traditions. Even Martha Washington herself was rumored to have produced one of the greatest pies in the area.

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