What Cheese To Eat With Dessert Wine

How Do You Pair Dessert Wine and Cheese?

  • Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. ” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ id=”mntl-sc-block-image 2-0-1″ data-tracking-container=”true”> ” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ id=”mntl-sc-block-image 2-0-1″ data-tracking-container=”true”> Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. Portis is a fortified wine (which means that the fermentation process has been halted, leaving residual sugar) produced in Portugal. In general, less priced ports have aromas reminiscent of sweet, luscious black berries, but vintage and aged ports have flavors reminiscent of dried fruits with traces of caramelized almonds, according to the Wine Advocate. While port with the blue cheese Stilton is a typical combination, the wine may be be enjoyed with other blue cheeses as well. Make a garnish of walnuts or pecans, either raw or candied, on top of the blue cheese to bring out the nuttiness of the wine even further.

Sherry

  • Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. “data-caption=”” data-caption=”” In the following example, the data-expand attribute is 300 and the id attribute is mntl-sc-block image 2-0-5. The data-tracking-container attribute is true. srcset=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w”” Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. It is possible to find sherry in a range of styles and sweetness levels because it is a fortified wine from Spain. Amontillado, Oloroso, Cream Sherry, and Pedro Ximénez are some of the varieties available, and they range in sweetness from somewhat sweet to extremely sweet. Whichever you select, they will all go well with the cheese you serve them with. Heavily nutty in flavor with a touch of dried figs, sherries pair well with salty Spanish cheeses such as Manchego, Cabrales, Mahon, and Serra de Estrella
  • They also pair well with cured meats and cured fish.

Madeira

  • Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. “data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ id=”mntl-sc-block-image 2-0-9″ data-tracking-container=”true” id=”mntl-sc-block-image 2-0-9″ data-tracking-container=”true” srcset=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w”” Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. The island of Madeira, located off the coast of North Africa and considered to be a part of Portugal, is the inspiration for this dessert wine, which may be aged for several decades. Look for a Malmsey Madeira, which is richer and sweeter than port wine while remaining balanced due to the presence of more acidity than port wine. Madeira, which has a tiny nutty flavor to it, works nicely with cheeses that have a nutty flavor to them, such as Gruyère, Petite Basque, and Zamorano. Aside from that, Madeira goes nicely with blue cheeses.

Sauternes

  • Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. “the data-caption=”” the data-expand=”300″ the id=”mntl sc block image 2-0-13″ the data-tracking-container=”true” data-tracking-container=”true srcset=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w”” Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. When it comes to the flavor, this sweet wine from France is typically linked to apricots, peaches, and honey with just a hint of nuttiness on the finish. With blue cheeses or salty washed rind cheeses such asEpoisses, a pungent “stinky cheese” with a rich, slightly meaty flavor, sauternes’ flavor profile works well together. Please proceed to number 5 of 7 in the list below.

Sweet Riesling

  • Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. “data-caption=”” data-caption=”” the block image 2-0-16″ data-expand=”300″ the block image 2-0-16″ data-tracking-container=”true” the block image 2-0-16 srcset=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w”” Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. All Rieslings, whether dry, off-dry, or sweet, are particularly well-suited to pairing with cheese. Those serving cheese as a dessert dish should search for Rieslings labeled with terms such as Spatlese, Auslese, Beerenauslese, or Late Harvest, since these terms all imply that the Riesling will be on the sweeter side of the spectrum. Selles-sur-Cher (or other soft goat cheeses), Reblochon, Camembert, and Muenster are good pairings for sweet Riesling. Comte, Beaufort, and Hoch Ybrig are good pairings for tougher cheeses that have a “Swiss taste,” such as Comte, Beaufort, and Hoch Ybrig. Rieslings are also a good match for a mild white Cheddar.

Gewürztraminer

  • Jennifer Meier’s The Spruce is available for purchase. “data-caption=”” data-description=”” In the following example, the data-expand attribute is 300. The id of the block image is _2-0-16, and the tracking container is true (data-expand=”300″ ). set=”566w” src=”” src=”” src=”” src=”” src=””” Jennifer Meier’s The Spruce is available for purchase. Wines that go well with cheese include all Rieslings, including dry, off-dry, and sweet. Those serving cheese as a dessert dish should search for Rieslings labeled with terms such as Spatlese, Auslese, Beerenauslese, or Late Harvest, since these adjectives all imply that the Riesling will be on the sweeter side of the spectrum. Selles-sur-Cher (or other soft goat cheeses), Reblochon, Camembert, and Muenster are all good pairings for sweet Riesling. Comte, Beaufort, and Hoch Ybrig are all good pairings for hard cheeses that have a “Swiss flavor.” Also, a quality white Cheddar goes well with a Riesling.

Sweet Sparkling Wines

  • Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. “data-caption=”” data-caption=”” the block image 2-0-24 mntl sc block expand=”300″ the tracking container=”true” the tracking container=”true” srcset=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w” src=”566w”” Jennifer Meier is the author of The Spruce. Demi-sec Champagnes and Italian Moscato d’Asti are delightfully sweet sparkling wines that are perfect for serving at the beginning of a meal, but they may also be enjoyed at the conclusion of a meal, especially when served with a range of cheeses. Combination suggestions: Parmigiano-Reggiano, soft goat cheeses, or triple-cream cheese

Wine and Cheese Pairing: the Best Cheeses for Dessert Wines

As a substitute for dessert, many individuals choose to finish their meal with a delicious cheese, which is complemented with fruit (fresh or dried). It is not necessary to consume a cake slice in order to conclude your supper with sweet and fruity flavors: only serve topair cheese with a dessert wine will do. This is a difficult match to achieve because both wines and cheeses have rich flavors. Cheeses differ in terms of taste, fat content, and texture. A variety of qualities influence the taste of wines, including body, acidity, sweetness, and structure.

Particularly in this article, we’ll look at how to match dessert wine and cheese together well.

Wine and cheese pairings for beginners

The first thing to understand is that sweet and salty go together like peanut butter and jelly: the sweetness of the wine is properly balanced by the savory flavor of the cheese. It is also difficult to match wines and cheeses because of the differences in their organoleptic qualities. Fresh cheeses have a greater liquid content and a creamier texture than aged cheeses. They require a wine with greater acidity and freshness. Because of the passage of time, the liquid evaporates, and the cheese’s flavor becomes more savory.

  • According to the location or manner of seasoning, as well as the components that mature inside them, this process might be different.
  • Dessert wines have a similar pattern of development: their taste improves with age.
  • Another significant suggestion is to sample topair wines and cheeses from the same region as their source.
  • Therefore, it is a good idea to maintain combinations as close as possible to their places of origin wherever possible.

Wine and cheese pairing guide

Listed below is a list of cheese varieties and dessert wines that might be paired together.

Fresh cheese

Fresh cheeses should not be served with tannic wines; instead, fruity wines with a light taste, such as effervescent Champagne or a sweet Moscato, Riesling, or White Port, should be used. Wine and cheese suggestions: Marsala superiore and fresh ricotta enhanced with chopped pistacchio are also excellent choices. Marsala superiore has a sweet flavor, which makes wine ideal for pairing with ricotta in a dessert!

Semi-hard cheese

Semi-hard cheeses require wines that are more structured, with fruity, acidic, and tannic aromas and tastes.

Pair with Champagne, vintage Port, and Sherry. Emmental, Gruyère, Tomme, and Castelmagno Wine and cheese suggestions: Moscato di Noto and Castelmagno, both from Italy, to savor the varied shades of Italian tastes from Piedmont to Sicily, as well as the aromas of the Mediterranean.

Stinky cheese

To complement and mellow the powerful flavors of cheeses such as Taleggio and Morbier, sweet wines should be served with them (Riesling, Sauternes). The following is a wine and cheese pairing suggestion: Pont l’eveque with Champagne, two old tastes from the French tradition.

Blue cheese

To combine with cheeses such as Stilton, Gorgonzola, and Roquefort (or Fourme d’Ambert), consider red Ports such as Madeira, Sauternes, Sherry, and Tokaji. The sweet notes of these veined cheeses mingle with the sharpness of the sweet flavors in this combo. Wine and cheese combo suggestion: Roquefort and Sauternes are a traditional combination.

Hard cheese

Aged cheeses necessitate fuller-bodied, more structured wines with a more nuanced taste profile. Cheeses such as aged Cheddar, Gouda, Pecorino, and Parmigiano Reggiano pair well with wines such as Montefalco Sagrantino Passito, Champagne, Prosecco, Madeira, Marsala superiore, Moscato d’Asti, Moscato di Noto, red Port, Sauternes, Sherry, and Vinsanto (as well as other Italian wines). Wine and cheese suggestions: Montefalco Sagrantino Passito and Pecorino di Fossa, two regional products that bring out the best of two exquisite tastes from the heart of Italy, respectively.

Cheese and winebyVanessa lollipopCC2.0
  • The cheeses Gorgonzola, Cheddar DOP, gruyere, Camembert Cheese Recipes, Brie Cheese, and Pecorino are some of the most popular cheeses in the world. Gorgonzola, Cheddar DOP, gruyere, Camembert Cheese Recipes, Brie Cheese, and Pecorino are some of the most popular cheeses in the world.

Sweet Wine Pairings With Cheese

Sweet Wine Pairings with Cheese»Sweet Wine Pairings with Cheese Sweet Wine Pairings With Cheese has encouraged me to create something new. This is due to the fact that they remind me of this time of year.

Sweet Wine Pairings With Cheese

When you taste the ideal pairing of wine and cheese, there is something wonderful that happens. The ideal coupling makes me want to appreciate and respect the flavors of both the wine and the cheese even more since they are so well-matched. In my mind, when I combine wine with food, especially cheese, I’m thinking about how to make the best combination for both. The ideal pairing of cheese and wine is analogous to the perfect pairing of a marriage in many ways. In the same way that cheese and wine complement one another, one individual may bring the other into balance.

I am equally inspired by Spring itself when it comes to making the perfect pairing.

The blossoms and blooming that are outside my home and in my garden are what I am most inspired by throughout the spring season. This is quite similar to the blossoms and blooms that are linked with grapes on the vines and the fermentation process that occurs during the production of wine. Without a doubt, the pleasant flavor of wine may be the perfect complement to the warm weather of springtime. I must point out that when I speak to sweet wine, I am also referring to the sweeter versions of dry wines or off-dry wines that are available.

There are several things to keep in mind when it comes to matching cheese to wine.

If you pair just any wine with any cheese that you happen to have sitting in your refrigerator, you run the risk of ruining the whole experience for anyone who happens to be sharing the cheese and wine. This is due to the fact that cheese and wine must complement one another, much like the previously described marriage.

Fortunately, the concept of combining wine and cheese is not a difficult one to grasp. When it comes to selecting a wine and cheese, it is only a matter of keeping a few points in mind. People who wish to think about the combination in greater depth can undoubtedly do so as well, though.

Here is what you need to keep in mind when you are thinking about pairing your sweet wine with the perfect cheese.

Tannins in wine are important when it comes to combining your wine with other foods. In order to fully understand what tannins are, it is necessary to go into detail. To cut a long tale short, tannins are a component of wine that influences the texture of the wine by adding to it. Tannins are a type of polyphenol that is found in plants and can affect the taste, color, and flavor of wine. Tannins can be found in red wine, white wine, and sparkling wine. Tannins play an important role in the production of red wine.

When pairing a red wine with cheese, a firm cheese might help to balance out the tannins in the wine.

Even so, there will be some similarities between the cheeses that are chosen and the wines that they will be paired with, as there will be between the wines that they will be paired with.

Acidity is also a bit deal when it comes to pairing white wines with cheese.

You probably already knew that tannins are key when it comes to matching red wine with cheese. When it comes to wine, it is generally agreed that white wine is more acidic than red wine in nature. It is the acidity in white wine that gives it its crisp flavor and appearance. The cheeses with which we pair these wines will frequently serve to balance out the flavor of the wine rather than to enhance it. Furthermore, these wines mix nicely with softer and more fatty cheeses rather than with hard or dry cheeses, as previously said.

I mentioned that I was inspired by the Spring season to post this article.

In addition to spring, I must admit that Mother’s Day, as well as the graduation season, serve as sources of inspiration for me. It simply feels like this time of year is ideal for pairing a sweet wine with a delicious cheese plate. By the way, while you’re here, you might be interested in these more suggestions.

  • When it Comes to Wine Calories, the Ultimate Buttery Chocolate Chip Cookie, and How to Make Homemade Wine Gummy Candy, there’s a lot to consider.

Jump to the Pairings section. Make sure to follow me onPinterest |Facebook| andInstagram for regular updates. Also, make sure to sign up for my weekly email!

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Pairings of Sweet Wines with Cheddar

Sweet Wine Pairings With Cheese

As previously said, these pairings have just as much to do with the cheese as they do with the wine in question. When it comes to white wine, we strive to achieve a harmonious balance between acidity and flavor. With the red wines, we make an effort to balance the flavors of the two wines so that they may function together in your mouth. I’ll be pairing some of the most popular sweet wines on the market. As a consequence of the color of the wine, you may notice some similarities in the pairings of cheeses that are available.

The popular sweet white wines.

  • Moscato This wine is frequently referred to be an off-dry wine that is also light in body. Moscato is frequently matched with ingredients that will help to balance out the richness of the wine’s sweetness. Cheeses that are spicy or salty are excellent selections. Additionally, cheeses with a butterier flavor and consistency are preferred. Pepper Cheeses such as Jack, Brie, and Muenster are also excellent choices. Riesling This is again another off-dry white wine that is light in body. It is recommended to match sweet Riesling with dishes that will balance out its fruity flavor because it has a sweet taste on its own. Cheeses that are salty or have a strong taste pair nicely with Riesling. Cheeses such as blue cheese, aged gouda, and feta, as well as sparkling wines and champagne, are excellent selections. Because they assist to balance out the more fatty components of cheese, the bubbles make it easier to match them with cheese. In my tongue, I appreciate how these sparklers may help to balance out the softer and more buttery cheeses I’m eating. As a result, I really enjoy Camembert and Brie, especially when served with sparklers.
See also:  St. George's Riesling Dessert Wine Where To Buy

The popular sweet red wines wines.

  • Port is considered to be the sweetest of all red wines. Port wine is divided into many categories. Port wines, in general, are characterized as being sweet and full-bodied. A richer and fuller-bodied fruit taste, as well as undertones of spice and even chocolate, distinguish vintage port from its contemporaries. Blue cheese, Gorgonzola, and sharp cheddar cheeses are all wonderful pairings for this type of port. This port wine is mellower in flavor, but also richer and more nutty in flavor than the more traditional port wine. I enjoy the concept of cheeses that are salty and firm, such as Parmesan Reggiono, in my cheese platter. Smoked cheeses are also popular here, as is Merlot, which is recognized for its fruity flavors, with hints of cedar and even chocolate in it. This works nicely with either a hard cheese or a milder cheese, depending on your preference. Gouda has a pleasant smoky flavor that pairs well with Merlot. Gruyere, Gorgonzola, and even Jarlsberg cheeses are excellent choices
  • Syrah/Shiraz is a good match (depending on where it is from) The depth of flavor in Syrah and Shiraz makes them a good match for aged cheese. Cheddar that has been aged is ideal. Alternatively, Edam, Gouda, and Parmesan cheese can be served with Syrah/Shiraz.

Sweet Wine Pairings With Cheese

  • When it comes to entertaining for parties and festivities, the combination of sweet wine and cheese is unsurpassed. Here are the best sweet wine and cheese combos for you to try: Course Appetizers and Sides are included.
  • It has already been established that these pairings have as much to do with the cheese as they do with the wine
  • Yet, When it comes to white wine, we strive to achieve a harmonious balance between acidity and flavor. While making the red wines, we make an effort to balance the flavors of the two wines so that they may operate together in your mouth.
  • Here’s how to pair the most popular sweet wines with the most appropriate cheese:

The popular sweet white wines.

  • Moscato is generally defined as an off-dry wine that is also light in body
  • It is frequently combined with tastes that will help to balance out the sweetness of the wine. Cheeses that are spicy or salty are excellent selections. In addition, cheeses with a butterier flavor and consistency are preferred.
  • This is again another off-dry white wine that is light in body. It is recommended to match sweet Riesling with dishes that will balance out its fruity flavor because it has a sweet taste on its own. Cheeses that are salty or have a strong taste pair nicely with Riesling. A variety of cheeses such as blue cheese, aged gouda, and feta are suitable options.

Sparkling wines and Champagne are among the most popular types of sparkling wine.

  • Because they assist to balance out the more fatty components of cheese, the bubbles make it easier to match them with cheese. In my tongue, I appreciate how these sparklers may help to balance out the softer and more buttery cheeses I’m eating. As a result, I really enjoy Camembert and Brie, especially when served with sparklers.

The popular sweet red wines wines.

Port is considered to be the sweetest of all red wines. Port wine is divided into many categories.

  • Wines from Portugal, in general, are recognized for being sweet and full-bodied
  • Vintage Port, on the other hand, has a richer and full-bodied fruit taste, as well as traces of spice and even chocolate
  • Blue cheese, Gorgonzola, and Sharp cheddar cheeses are all wonderful pairings for this type of port. – Tawny Port- This port wine has a more mellow flavor, but it is also richer and nutty in flavor. I enjoy the concept of cheeses that are salty and firm, such as Parmesan Reggiono, in my cheese platter. Smoked cheeses are very popular in this area.

Merlot is a red wine with a fruity flavor with hints of wood and even chocolate in it.

  • This works nicely with either a hard cheese or a milder cheese, depending on your preference. Gouda has a pleasant smoky flavor that pairs well with Merlot. Gruyere, Gorgonzola, and even Jarlsberg cheeses are excellent choices.

Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah/Shiraz (depending on where it is from)

  • Old cheeses go nicely with Syrah and Shiraz because of the strength of the flavors in the wines. Cheddar that has been aged is ideal. Alternatively, Edam, Gouda, and Parmesan cheese can be served with Syrah/Shiraz.

Champagne, cheese, feta, Merlot, Moscoto, Port, Riesling, sparkling wine, and sweet wine are some of the words that come to mind.

12 Classic Wine and Cheese Pairings You Must Try

Here are 12 of the most traditional wine and cheese combos that you just must try. They pair some of the world’s most unique wines with this historic match to discover the awesomeness of what this legendary match has to offer. Of course, this does not imply that any wine will go well with any cheese in particular. So, where do you even start? Throughout this essay, we’ll look at 12 different wine and cheese pairings that demonstrate exactly how wonderful and harmonious this combination can be.

Pinot Noir and Gruyere

Why it works is as follows: When combined with the nutty aromas found in a medium-firm cheese such as Gruyere, the Pinot Noir’s persistent red berry fruit makes for a delicious pairing. Neither is overwhelming the other in terms of fragrance or complexity, which is exactly what you want in a pairing like this! Try pairings like as Beaujolais and Jarlsberg, Gamay Noir and Comté, or Zweigelt and Emmental. Purchase the book and receive the course! With the purchase of Wine Folly: Magnum Edition, you will receive the Wine 101 Course (a $29 value) for free.

Aged Port and Blue Stilton

Why it works is as follows: Portis is characterized by its large body, sweetness, and assertive attitude. And when you’re dealing with all of that, you need a cheese that’s as pungent as the situation calls for. The rich flavour of a pungent and salty Blue Stilton pairs nicely with the sweetness of an older, more sophisticated Port. Keep in mind that the sweeter the wine, the stinkier the cheese will be. Try pairings such as: Ice Wine and Beenleigh Blue, Oloroso Sherry and Torta del Casar, or Sauternes and Roquefort.

Champagne and Brie

Why it works is as follows: In order to cut through the fat of triple-cream cheeses such as Brie, something sharp and acidic must be used to complement the texture. The strong acidity and delightfully stinging bubbles of Champagne blend with the dense creaminess of Brie to create a very pleasing contrast in taste and texture. Furthermore, the brioche flavor that you get with classic technique sparklers lends a delectable toastiness to the finished product. Additionally, try pairing Chardonnay with Camembert, Cava with Délice de Bourgogne, or Crémant with Époisses.

Moscato d’Asti and Gorgonzola

For the same reason that funkier cheeses call for sweeter wines, the lightness ofMoscatoand other sweet white wines might be a welcome change if you’ve been used to pairing pungent cheeses with hefty, fortified wines in the past. The crisp, acidic fruit of a Moscato d’Asti helps to cleanse your palate of heavier cheeses such as Gorgonzola, leaving you feeling lovely and rejuvenated after drinking it. Try pairings like as Gewürztraminer and Munster or Prosecco and Asiago.

Tempranillo and Idiazabal

Tempranillo and Idiazabal are a fantastic illustration of the old saying, “if it grows together, it goes together,” and this wine is no exception. Both are Spanish, and both have rich, smokey tastes that are a fantastic compliment for each other when served together. The robust body found in a typical Tempranillo pairs beautifully with the firmer texture of Idiazabal, while the tannins in the wine contrast with the buttery taste of the cheese to create a delicious pairing.

Also try: Rioja and Manchego, Garnacha and Zamorano, or Menca and Roncal, to name a few options.

Sauvignon Blanc and Goat Cheese

Tempranillo and Idiazabal are a fantastic illustration of the old saying, “if it grows together, it goes together,” which holds true here. These two dishes are both of Spanish origin, and both have rich, savory, smokey tastes that pair nicely together. The robust body found in a typical Tempranillo pairs beautifully with the firmer texture of Idiazabal, while the tannins in the wine contrast with the buttery taste of the cheese to create a really memorable pairing. Also try: Rioja and Manchego, Garnacha and Zamorano, or Menca and Roncal, to name a few examples.

Cabernet Sauvignon and Aged Cheddar

This wine pairs well with a large, robust cheese because it can pick it up, spin it about, and not get winded in the process. A fattiness to aged Cheddar that pairs well with the mouth-drying tannins found in many Cabernet Sauvignons is a beautiful combination. Additionally, their contrasting robust tastes will complement one another rather than one overpowering the other. Also try: Carménère and Smoked Gouda, Montepulciano and Parmigiano-Reggiano, orNero d’Avola and Asiago.

Provence Rosé and Havarti

Why it works is as follows: When combined with a Provence Rosé, the crisp, red berry taste is delectable but delicate, and the mellow flavor of a Havarti cheese complements the wine without dominating it. The Provence Rosé’s steely minerality, in addition to its smooth, soft texture, makes for a wonderful contrast with the cheese’s smooth, soft texture. Try pairing it with:Pinot Noir Rosé and Fontina, Sangiovese Rosé and Mozzarella, or Rosado and Ricotta, among other things.

Riesling and Raclette

Why it works is as follows: Known for its smooth and buttery texture, Raclette is a mild and versatile cheese that complements the intense acidity and stone fruit aromas found in aRiesling wine exceptionally well. Because of the fragrant smells of the German classic, a delicate and unexpected nuttiness may be detected in a high-quality Havarti cheese. Consider pairing the cheese with an off-dry Riesling from Kabinettor so that the sweetness of the wine does not overshadow the cheese. Try pairings such as NZ Sauvignon Blanc and Mild Cheddar, Silvaner and Raclette, or Gewürztraminer and Edam, among others.

Chianti Classico and Pecorino Toscano

Why it works is as follows: Pecorino and Chianti Classico are another excellent “grows together, goes together” combo, with the firm, aged texture of the Pecorino contrasting well with the rippling tannins of the Chianti Classico. The savory secondary notes in a Chianti bring out a concealed herbaceous taste in the cheese, with the wine’s dark fruit standing up to the assertiveness of the Pecorino wonderfully. Also try: Sangiovese and Parmigiano-Reggiano, or Brunello di Montalcino and Grana Padano, to name a few of alternatives.

Vermentino and Fiore Sardo

Why it works is as follows: In combination with aVermentino, a nutty sheep’s cheese known as Fiore Sardo complements the more oily texture of the latter. The saline tastes of both ensure that they complement one another, with Vermentino’s citrus notes bringing a fruity acidity to the rich character of a sheep’s milk cheese like Fiore Sardo, while the saline flavors of both ensure that they complement one another (aka Pecorino Sardo).

Try other combinations such as: Soave and Mascarpone, Grechetto and Fromage Blanc, or Verdicchio and Requesón.

Malbec and Edam

Why it works is as follows: The combination of Edam’s nutty tastes and Malbec’s velvety fruit is the kind of match that just about anybody can appreciate and appreciates. As a consequence, the wine and cheese are both delicious and fragrant without being overbearing, creating a harmonious combination of complex flavors. There are several other options, including:Shirazand Gouda,Monastrelland Tomme, andBlaufränkischand Abbaye de Belloc Make an effort to incorporate at least one of the sweet wine and cheese combinations described above if you’re throwing a party and serving cheese and wine to guests.

We are so in love with wine and cheese that we decided to turn it into a poster!

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dessert cheese board (+ the perfect wine pairings!)

This dessert cheese board is brimming with after-dinner cheeses, fresh berries and autumn fruits, and it comes complete with the right wine pairings! This fall, the greatest snacks and appetizers to offer at the perfect ladies’ night out or dinner party are listed below. Dessert dessert cheese board wine pairing: Shiraz dessert dessert cheese board

  • 15-inch layer cake with 2015 Shiraz, smoked gouda, seasonal fruit of choice (pears, grapes, sweet apples), dried fruits of choice (apricots, dried cherries), and crackers of choice

Dessert dessert cheese board wine pairing: Malbec dessert dessert cheese board

  • A layer cake made with 2016 Malbec, aged manchego cheese (old cheddar is also delicious! ), berries of your choosing (particularly blackberries! ), figs, candied almonds, and dark chocolate.

Wine pairings for the Bourbon Barrel Aged Cabernet Sauvignon cheese platter include:

  • Layer Cake2016Bourbon Barrel Aged Cabernet Sauvignon
  • Goat cheese (sprinkled with brown sugar, please! )
  • Berries of choice (raspberries are a major yes! )
  • Small dark chocolate chunk biscotti
  • Little dark chocolate chunk biscotti

Instructions

Take out your favorite cheese board, huge dish, or tray and get to work. I like to start with the cheeses since they are so delicious. Place them around the board, slicing or tearing them apart as needed to get the desired effect. Fill in the blanks with berries, dried fruits, almonds, crackers, and/or chocolates, if you so like. Beginning with the largest components and working my way down the board, I’ve discovered that it’s easier to fill in any remaining gaps with smaller components.

Have a good time with it! Serve with your favorite Layer Cake wine or wines of your choosing. Enjoy yourself, but only in moderation! Cheers!

Notes

  • This is little more than a wireframe. An assortment of these components will be included in a dessert cheese board, but feel free to get creative and include your ultimate cheese board favorites as well.
See also:  What Dessert Wine Pairs Well With Creme Brulee

Cheese board for dessert, cheese board for snacking

don’t forget to pin this dessert cheese board for later!

It’s New Year’s Eve, and your guests are set to swarm into your house like flies. You lay out bowls of salty snacks as well as a large cheese board for guests to enjoy. In addition to the creamy white chèvre, a Stilton, some Brie, nutty aged Gruyère, acidic Vermont cheddar, and a splurge-worthy wedge of 4-year Gouda are included. Just before the doorbell rings, you place a flourish on the tray and garnish it with fruits and nuts. It’s time to break out the champagne corks. Of course, there will be Champagne, and who knows what else will be on the menu.

  1. However, the good news is that your visitors will be delighted regardless of what you serve.
  2. Pairing wine and cheese is more difficult than you may imagine.
  3. Cheeses differ in terms of moisture level, fat content, texture, and flavor, among other characteristics.
  4. Fortunately, following a few simple rules will ensure that your matchmaking efforts are successful, and by midnight, your cheese and wine will be arm in arm singing Auld Lang Syne.

Protip: Consider Age and Intensity

Meg Houston Maker is a woman who creates things. All of cheesedom can be divided into three categories: fresh, medium-aged, and hard-aged. Cheeses that are young and still fresh have a high water content and a milky, delicate texture. During the aging process of cheese, a process known as affinage occurs, the moisture in its body gradually evaporates, leaving behind fat and protein. Because fat and protein carry flavor, older cheeses tend to be richer and more savory in flavor. In addition to drying and concentrating the cheese, aging also imparts new flavors to the product.

  1. Older cheeses such as Gruyère and Emmental develop nutty flavors as they age.
  2. Washed-rind cheeses, such as Époisses, develop a funky, bacon-y odor that you either love or despise depending on your mood.
  3. Young wines are lively and spirited, with vibrant aromas and flavors of fruits, flowers, citrus, herbs, and spices, as well as a hint of spice.
  4. Their primary fruit flavors are enhanced by secondary notes of oak, toast, earthy notes of oxidation, mineral notes of minerals, umami, and a variety of other flavors.
  5. Immediately, we can see how young cheeses would pair well with wines that are juicy and fruity as well as fresh and spirited, such as sparkling wines, crisp whites, dry rosés, and red wines with bright acidity and vibrant fruit.
  6. It’s best to pair aged cheeses with wines that are full-bodied with plenty of structure and flavor, as well as oxidative notes if they’re aged for more than a few years.

We arrive at the first rule of wine and cheese pairing after putting everything together. Pair based on flavor intensity, and take into consideration the relationship between intensity and age.

More Essential Pairing Pointers

Meg Houston Maker is a woman who creates things. However, age isn’t the only element to consider while making a decision. The texture, saltiness, and pungency of a cheese, as well as the structure and sweetness of a wine, all have an impact on a wine match. Here are a few other considerations to bear in mind: Keep an eye on those tannins. Tasty, matured cheeses go well with tannin-rich red wines because the tannins in the wine physically attach to the protein and fat in the cheese, cleansing your tongue after each mouthful.

  1. If you must serve red wine with young cheeses, use a low-tannin variety such as Beaujolais or sparkling red Lambrusco, which are both low in tannin.
  2. Sweet wines complement the saltiest cheeses, such as hard Grana, blue cheese, aged Gouda, or feta, to a stunning degree.
  3. Fruit and nuts are particularly fond of cheese.
  4. Fruits that are luscious and tart pair nicely with young cheeses such as Brie.
  5. Buttery, bitter almonds pair well with a savory cheese like Cheddar.
  6. When in doubt, try to visualize what cuisine would go best with a particular cheese and use that to influence your selection of a bottle of wine.
  7. Rich, creamy cheeses merge perfectly with buttery, oaky white wines, resulting in a genuinely harmonic taste feeling that is impossible to describe.
  8. The bubbles in sparkling wines serve as a pleasant complement to a creamy cheese, cleansing your tongue clean and making you want to take another piece of your cheese plate.
  9. What grows together tends to stay together as well.
  10. When it comes to Époisses, a creamy cow’s milk cheese whose rind is washed with a brandy created from Burgundian grape skins, red Burgundy is a natural pairing.

It is not always possible to pair wines and cheeses perfectly by area (for example, I would not offer fresh Loire goat cheese with a tannic Loire Cabernet Franc), but pairings by terroir are a good place to start.

Get to the Cheat Sheet, Already!

Here’s a simple method to mixing wine and cheese that everyone can follow. Identify each cheese by kind in the list below, and then choose a wine from the suggested list to achieve matching nirvana.

Fresh and Soft Cheeses

Jessica Leibowitz is a writer who lives in New York City. Crisp whites, dry rosés, sparkling wines, dry aperitif wines, and light-bodied reds with minimal tannins are all excellent pairings for fresh and soft cheeses. The finest wines to pair with this dish are those with apple, berry, stone fruit, tropical, melon, or citrus notes. Avoid tannic red wines with a lot of tannin, such as Malbec, Cabernet Sauvignon, Bordeaux, and Bordeaux blends. Ricotta, Mozzarella, Burrata, Chèvre, Feta, Halloumi, Brie, Camembert, Brillat-Savarin, Crottin, and Bûcheron are some of the cheeses available.

Fino sherry is a type of sherry that is aged for a long period of time.

Semi-hard, Medium-aged Cheeses

Jessica Leibowitz is a writer who lives in New York City. These cheeses have a harder texture and stronger tastes than other types of cheese. The wines they require include medium-bodied whites with fruity undertones; vintage sparkling wines; and aperitif wines that strike a balance between the acidity, fruit, and tannin. The cheeses include: Havarti, Edam, Emmental, Gruyère, Jarlsberg, young Cheddar, Monterey Jack, Manchego, and Tomme d’Alsace (from Alsace, France). Serve alongside Chardonnay, white Burgundy, white Bordeaux, Pinot Blanc, Viognier, white Rhône blends, Riesling (off-dry), Gewürztraminer, Champagne, red Burgundy, Pinot Noir, Beaujolais, Dolcetto, Barbera, Zinfandel, Merlot, vintage Port, young Tawny Port, Amontillado sherry, and a variety of cheeses.

Stinky Cheeses

Stephanie Stiavetti is a model and actress. Light-bodied wines with subdued aromatics that compliment rather than compete with stinky cheeses are the best accompaniments. Cheeses: Époisses, Taleggio, and Morbier are all excellent choices. Pair with: Gewürztraminer, Riesling, Sauternes, red Burgundy, Pinot Noir, and other white wines.

Blue Cheeses

Meg Houston Maker is a woman who creates things. In order to balance the strong tastes of blue cheese and the often salty, savory body of the cheese, wines with both oomph and sweetness are required. Cheeses: Stilton, Gorgonzola, Roquefort, Cambozola, and Bleu d’Auvergne are some of the most popular cheeses in the world. Pair with:red Port, tawny Port, Sauternes, Oloroso sherry, Banyuls, Recioto, Tokaji, and other sweet wines.

Hard-aged Cheeses

Stephanie Stiavetti is a model and actress. Harder cheeses are best paired with full-bodied whites and tannic red wines. Their nuttiness pairs well with oxidative wines such as sherry, while their saltiness pairs well with sweet wines such as port. Cured cheeses include: aged Cheddar (including Cheshire), Comté (including Comté), aged Gruyère (including Gruyère), aged Gouda (including Gouda), Pecorino, Manchego (including Manchego) and Asiago (including Asiago). Served with:Old white Burgundy or Bordeaux, white Rhône blends, sweet Riesling, Viognier, vintage Champagne, or a charcuterie board of your choice The following wines are available: Vin Jaune, red Burgundy and red Bordeaux, Cabernet Sauvignon, Barolo, Barbaresco, Nebbiolo and Petite Sirah from California, California red blends, red Rhône blends and Zinfandel from Spain.

Other wines include: red Port, Tawny Port, Madeira, Sauternes and Oloroso sherry.

One Wine to Rule Them All?

If you must serve a single wine with a varied plate of cheeses, try a Riesling, particularly an off-dry kind. It’s great to open a variety of bottles to sample with your cheese array. Although the wine is low in alcohol, its acidity, sweetness, tropical fruits, and mineral backbone allow it to pair well with a variety of foods. Another excellent option is the Alsatian Gewürztraminer. Despite the fact that it is dry and has a delicate body, its flowery fragrances will float ethereally over the savory notes of all of the cheeses.

Their strong acidity and toasted, nutty tastes go well with a variety of cheeses, from fresh to aged.

Cheese and wine matching: the ultimate guide

  • Hard cheeses such as cheddar or Comté: white Burgundy, Nebbiolo, Pinot Noir, Rioja, or a red Bordeaux mix
  • Hard cheeses such as cheddar or Comté: Champagne, Chablis, Hunter Semillon, Beaujolais are examples of soft cheese. The following blue cheeses are recommended: Sauternes, Pedro Ximénez Sherry, Rutherglen Muscat
  • Sancerre, Dry Riesling, Rhônevarieties – red and white (if aged), Fino Sherry
  • Goat and sheep cheeses: Sancerre, Dry Riesling, Rhônevarieties – red and white (if aged), Fino Sherry
  • Goat and sheep cheeses: Fino Sherry
  • Cheeses with a washed rind include: Rioja, red Burgundy, Alsace Pinot Gris, and Gewurtztraminer
  • Hard cheeses include: Brie, Camembert, and Camembert
  • Soft cheeses include: Brie, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Camembert, Amontillado Sherry and tawny Port are excellent all-rounders.

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Gerard Basset is a Master of Wine and a Master Sommelier who is well-versed in the worlds of cheese and wine. The French-born resident Briton was granted the title of Best Sommelier in the World in 2010, possesses an MBA in wine, and has been awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for his contributions to the wine business. Basset’s ‘desert-island cheeseboard’ would have the following three cheeses:

  • Comté (France’s most popular cheese) aged 12 months for the hard
  • A ripe, butteryStilton for the blue
  • And aSt-Marcellin for the soft (a creamy raw cow’s milk cheese with a very high fat content)
  • And

But what wines should be paired with such a diverse range of cheeses? Do you want to choose three? One? And do you choose the wine first, then the cheese, or do you do it the other way around? ‘It’s pretty straightforward, and it all starts with a single rule,’ adds Basset. ‘Decide if you want to make the wine the star of the show or whether you want to feature the cheese. Pick a wine that has less flavour than the cheese and will only serve to compliment it in the background if it is the cheese.

Hard Cheese

Cheeses to try include:Comté, Emmental, Grana Padano, Gruyère (from cows), Lincolnshire Poacher (from sheep), Montgomery’s Cheddar (from cows), Parmigiano-Reggiano (from sheep), and Pecorino (from sheep).’Go for a rich, dry white wine or a light to medium-bodied red wine, as their tannins and weight will work well with the structure of the cheese,’ says Basset. Find a cheese that is somewhat fresh and relatively hard – not too much strength or age – to pair with your wine for the easiest cheese pairing experience.

Soft Cheese

Brie, Camembert, Chaource, Neufchâtel, Tunworth, St-Marcellin, St-Félicien, Vacherin, Waterloo are some of the best cheeses to try. In this case, caution should be exercised because many of these cheeses have strong personalities, particularly as they mature, says Basset. These wines would benefit from wines with strong acidity, which would help to cut through the excessive fat content of the wines.

Blue Cheese

Test out: Bleu d’Auvergne, Bleu des Causses, Cabrales, Gorgonzola, Stilton, and Roquefort cheeses, among others (sheep) According to Basset, “sweet wine is the quintessential pairing here, and everyone knows what that means.” When the cheese is creamy, it works especially nicely,’ says the chef.

You get the complement of the creamy texture of the cheese and wine’s structure, as well as a contrast between salty and sweet flavors, when you pair Stilton with a sweet wine.

Goat/Sheep Cheese

Crottin de Chavignol, Picodon, Ragstone, Tymsboro, Valençay are some of the goat breeds. Sheep breeds include Azeito, Ossau-Iraty, Roncal, Serra de Estrela, Wigmore, and others. Sancerre and Crottin de Chavignol are a famous match,’ says the author. There are exceptions to this rule, provided that the wine is ‘fresh and energetic in its acidity’. According to Basset, it is advisable to avoid really aged sheep or goat cheeses since they might be quite powerful.

Washed-rind

Try these wines: Epoisses, Langres, Livarot, Mahon, Maroilles, Munster, Pont L’Eveque, Stinking Bishop, Taleggio, and others. ‘Make an effort to select a younger cheese whose flavor will not overpower the wine. ‘ Basset does not believe that the match between Epoisses and red Burgundy is a typical regional encounter. ‘I’d like a more flamboyant wine that would hold up better over time. Cheeses for Chablis or mature Burgundy are not appropriate for this use since any nuance will be lost! It is a typical pairing of Munster and Gewurztraminer, and it would also be a good complement with other washed-rind cheeses.’

All for one, one for all

As an alternative, if all of this seems too complicated and you only want one wine to pair with a complete cheeseboard, Basset recommends looking at fortified wines, which are the perfect after-dinner companion. In the first instance, I’d recommend Montillado Sherry, Rioja, tawny Port, or Madeira. They pair very well with all cheeses since they are not overly delicately flavoured and because their flavor profile is comparable to that of the accompaniments you would offer with the cheese: nuts, dried fruit, and the spices in chutney.

Cheese and wine: before or after pudding?

Basset, ever the diplomat, asserts that he adheres to the customs of both his own and adopted country. ‘Because I’ve lived in England for a long time, I do both. There are no rules; you may do whatever works for you.’ He does acknowledge that the notion of concluding your savoury dishes with a sweet dessert and then returning to savoury with cheese is ‘illogical and somewhat frightening’ to the majority of French people, who find it ‘incomprehensible’. ‘However, this does not imply that it is incorrect.

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It’s all good. Having learnt about pairing wines with appetizers and main dishes, you’re ready to move on. Make sure to spare space for dessert, which is my favorite part of any dinner. This can be commemorated with a savory cheese platter or a sweet dessert, depending on your preference. To their advantage, they both go well with a wide variety of wines. CheesesThere’s an old adage in the wine business that goes, “Buy on apples, sell on cheese.” Cheese enhances the appearance of wine. The combination of wine and cheese, acid and base, is a pleasing one.

  1. Always pair locally sourced wines with regional cheeses.
  2. The white wine with cheese school is where I come from, and I will occasionally, but not always, switch back to a white wine for the cheese course after having had a red wine.
  3. A white Burgundy or Chardonnay would pair well with a firm goat cheese, as would a Pinot Noir, Merlot, Sangiovese, Syrah, or Cabernet Sauvignon.
  4. Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Barbaresco, Barolo, or Zinfandel are excellent matches for hard cow’s or sheep’s milk cheeses.
  5. The best wines to pair with blue and strong cheeses are sweet wines like as Sauternes or late-harvest Riesling (vendange tardive), Hungarian Tokaji, or Port from Portugal.
  6. If you’re making apple or other fruit pies or tarts, a late-harvest Riesling or a demi-sec sparkling wine will go perfectly.
  7. Muscat, particularly Muscat Beaumes-de-Venise, is a fantastic wine with melon.
See also:  1. How Important Is The Dessert Wine Segment To The Industry

Many dessert wines, ranging from demi-sec sparkling wines to late-harvest Riesling, Muscat, and different ice wines, are suitable for serving with creams, custards, and puddings.

Last but not least, there’s chocolate.

If you don’t have any, try avin santo or a Sauternes, a sweet sherry, or even a Tokay or Muscat liqueur as an alternative.

After a hearty red wine meal, you could do worse than to finish with a rich chocolate dessert to savor the last drops of wine.

When the food has been finalized, we check a wine list, the sommelier, or a wine merchant for recommendations on wines to pair with it.

Then there are the wine connoisseurs who, like my husband does on occasion, prefer to start with the wine and then go on to the meal.

When we go to a new restaurant for the first time, he begins by perusing the wine list, looking for a few “possibilities” that he thinks he could like.

The only difficulty is that he frequently reads the wine list from beginning to end.

So what if someone cares a bit too much? I’d rather be with someone who cares a little too little than the other way around. Aside from that, I have my own guideline that I adhere to: when in doubt, drink Champagne.

Perfect Wine Pairings for Cheese, Chocolate, and Appetizers

Good to hear from you! We’ve covered the basics of combining wine with both starters and major dishes. Make sure to spare space for dessert, which is my favorite part of every dinner. Either a savory cheese plate or an indulgent dessert might be served to commemorate the occasion. To their advantage, they complement a wide range of wines. A common adage in the wine industry is: “Buy on apples and sell on cheese.” This is true in the case of cheese. Wine looks better when cheese is served with it.

  • Therefore, practically any wine pairs well with cheese, while some pairings are preferable to others in terms of flavor intensity.
  • Probably because it’s what’s left in their glass or bottle at the conclusion of the meal when the cheese is presented, most people drink reds with cheese when they’re eating.
  • A classic or rosé Champagne pairs well with soft goat cheese, as does an indigenous white or Sauvignon Blanc from Sancerre or Chablis, or a Pinot Noir or Merlot from Burgundy.
  • Pinot Noir is the wine of choice for a high-quality cow’s or sheep’s milk cheese.
  • A fine white Burgundy or Chardonnay, as well as an excellent rosé Champagne, are also excellent pairings for hard cheese.
  • DessertsSometimes a dessert wine is also served as a dessert course.
  • With berries in season, a sweet wine such as Sauternes, Tokaji, or Vin Santo may be just the ticket.

Wine and other fresh fruits, as well as ice cream, are not my favorite pairings for wine.

Sauternes, vin santo, and Malvasia di Lipari are all excellent choices for cakes and biscuits.

It is imperative that you consider whether or not the mouth-filling sweet is sufficient in its own right while having chocolate for dessert.

You may also try a Tokay or Muscat liqueur.

It’s hard to go wrong with chocolate as a last course if your last meal was served with a full-bodied red wine.

We choose what we want to eat first and then look for a wine to pair with it, which is the standard procedure for food-and-wine pairings.

Additionally, we could go through our collection of bottles to see what we have on hand and whether it is of a vintage that would pair well with what we have planned to eat that night.

After experiencing the disappointment of several evenings at excellent restaurants that were marred by a quick or incorrect wine selection, he devised his own rule.

Afterwards, he peruses the menu in search of dishes that will go well with the particular wine or wines that he has selected.

Consequently, when we are dining tête à tête, I must maintain a monologue until he removes his nose from the cart. So what if someone cares too much, I’d rather be with them than with someone who doesn’t care enough. In addition, I have my own rule of thumb: when in doubt, drink Champagne.

Cheese, Please!

It’s all right. We’ve covered the basics of combining wine with appetisers and major dishes. Prepare yourself for my favorite part of any meal: dessert. This can be commemorated with a savory cheese platter or a sweet dessert, according on your preferences. Fortunately, they both go well with a wide variety of wines. CheesesThere’s a proverb in the wine industry that goes, “Buy on apples, sell on cheese.” Cheese improves the appearance of wine. Wine with cheese, acid and base, a harmonious combination.

  1. Always pair regional wines with regional cheeses.
  2. White wine with cheese is my preferred pairing, and I occasionally (though not always) switch back to a white wine for the cheese course after a red wine.
  3. a white Burgundy or Chardonnay would pair well with a firm goat cheese, as would a Pinot Noir, Merlot, Sangiovese, Syrah, or Cabernet Sauvignon.
  4. Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Barbaresco, Barolo, or Zinfandel are excellent matches with hard cow’s or sheep’s milk cheese, as is a wonderful white Burgundy or Chardonnay, as well as a beautiful rosé Champagne.
  5. DessertsSometimes a dessert wine is also served as a desert.
  6. A sweet wine such as a Sauternes, Tokaji, or Vin Santo can help to satisfy your sweet craving, especially when paired with fruit.
  7. I don’t care for wine served with other fresh fruits or ice cream.

Cakes and cookies would benefit from these choices, as would Sauternes, vin santo, and Malvasia di Lipari.

It is imperative that you consider whether or not the mouth-filling sweet is sufficient in and of itself while having chocolate for dessert.

Some others like Cabernet Sauvignon, as well.

The Subtle Flow of Events We choose what we want to eat first and then look for a wine to match with it, as is customary in the world of food-and-wine pairing.

We could also go through our collection of bottles to see what we have on hand and whether it is of a vintage that would pair well with what we have planned to eat.

Being aware that wonderful cuisine paired with a terrible wine means a horrible experience, and having had enough lunches at great places ruined by a quick or incorrect wine selection, he created his own rule.

Then he goes over the menu, looking for dishes that will go well with the wine or wines he has in mind.

As a result, while we are dining tête-à-tête, I must maintain a monologue until he takes his nose out of the cart.

So what if someone cares too much, I’d rather be with them than with someone who cares too little. In addition, I have my own guideline to fall back on: if in doubt, drink Champagne (or whatever).

Top tips:

  1. Like with like is a good rule of thumb. So, for example, a powerful wine with a bold cheese, or a light wine with a gentle cheese. When it comes to pairing cheese with wine, Brie pairs well with Chardonnay or Sparkling wine, whilst aged cheddar and aged gouda pair better with Cabernet Sauvignon. Beware of nasty, blue-veined cheeses, though! These tend to be robust, and they mix best with dessert wines, port, and sparkling wines
  2. And You’re just not sure? Try a mild cheese with a nutty flavor, such as Swiss or Jarlsberg, with almost anything. These versatile cheeses combine well with a wide range of wines.

A very well-stocked assortment of cheeses is available at Le Vigne Winery in Paso Robles, making it easy to choose the ideal complement for each of their wines.

Suggested Pairings:

Wines that pair with Gruyere include Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. Feta & Ricotta with a Pinot Grigio pairing Sparkling wine goes well with soft cheeses. Sharp Cheddar paired with Pinot Noir Cheeses with a kick: Zinfandel Smoked Cheeses: Red Blends (Smoked Cheddars) Tip: Cabernet Sauvignon may not be the greatest wine to combine with creamy Brie because of its tannins. With this robust wine, the high butterfat level and smooth texture of the cheese are not a suitable match. Additionally, the rind of the cheese may impart a metallic flavor to the wine.

Many vineyards provide cheese platters to accompany their wines, which are quite popular.

Members: Please give us a call before you travel to wine country so that we may arrange a VIP tasting experience for you there.

Mmm … Red Wine and Chocolate

For the longest period, at least. Most foodies would only choose Port as a combination for chocolate if they were really into it. However, things have changed. There are a plethora of red wines that are ready to take on the town when paired with chocolate, including Cabernet Sauvignon, Zinfandel, Syrah, Merlot, and Bordeaux-style blends. In red wine, there is something seductive about a chocolate-y, cocoa-tinged flavor profile – and you’ll know what I mean when you taste it. And when you do, you know you’ve discovered a wine that’s just asking to be paired with chocolate.

It’s not as sweet as milk chocolate, and it just seems to go better with the reds in this palette.

Take a sip of your beverage because the following is about to begin:

1. John Kelly Chocolates

Handcrafted chocolate and handcrafted wine are the ideal complement to one another. Is it possible to die from happiness? This is about as pleasant as it gets when it comes to John Kelly Chocolates, let us hope not. Ehlers Estate Merlot is a fine example of a Bordeaux varietal. Our current concept of paradise is a combination of John Kelly’s dark chocolate, French Grey Sea Salt, and Ehlers’ Merlot, since it brings out the very best in both flavors and textures. John Kelly is a Los Angeles-based chocolatier who runs a small business.

Helena area that is well-versed in the production of Merlot and other grape varieties.

Founded in 1996, Bill Easton’s modest winery has established itself as a Syrah hotbed in the Sierra Foothills; his Ascent wine has received more awards than any other wine in the region.

2. Guittard Chocolate NonpareilsZin, Cab, Merlot or Syrah and more

Pair this chocolate with a glass of full-bodied red wine. Chocolate addicts are well aware that not all nonpareils are created equal. These Guittard beauties are well worth the investment, and they are the ideal complement to virtually any rich red wine, including those listed above as well as proprietary reds, Bordeaux blends, and Rhone reds. We like the dark chocolate nonpareils, although we must admit that their milk chocolate nonpareils are also good, but they are not the greatest for the reds.

3. Homemade Blueberry BrowniesCabernet (with blueberry notes)

Yum. Yum, yum, yum. A hint of chocolate-loving blueberry is found in someCabernet Sauvignons, such as Bacio Divino’sJanzen Cab or theRocca Family’sCoombsville Cabernet Sauvignon, which makes people dizzy with delight. Both wineries are tiny, family-owned artisan businesses that consistently provide exceptional results. And we’ve found the perfect recipe for you! Brownies from a family recipes – you just sprinkle blueberries on top of the batter before baking it. Make cautious not to overcook the potatoes.

Caroline’s Chocolate Brownies

(This recipe comes from a community cookbook out of Rutland, Vermont, that is so ancient that it has a recipe for Potato Candy–the cover is missing, so we can’t say when year it was published!) 6 people can be accommodated. Preparation time: 10 minutes Preparation time: 15 minutes or more Ingredients: 2 quail eggs 12 cup butter 1 cup sugar 1 cup molasses 12 cup of all-purpose flour 1 cup toasted nuts (diced) 2 chocolate pieces, melted (or 12 cup baking cocoa, if desired) 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract 12 cup fresh blueberries Method: Cream together the butter and sugar until light and creamy.

  1. Make a thorough stir.
  2. Pour in the vanilla extract.
  3. 12 cup blueberries should be sprinkled on top.
  4. Then check every 3 minutes or so to make sure you are not overbaking.
  5. You are cordially invited!

Easy Appetizers and Wine Pairings

A simple method to entertain is to have a get-together of friends with delicious wine and snacks. We are here to assist you with three delectable appetizers that have been shared with us by some of our favorite wineries. For your convenience, we’ve included their wine matching ideas to make sure everything is great.

Fig, Goat CheeseProsciutto Appetizers

This recipe was sent to us by Milla Handley of Handley Cellars in Anderson Valley, who is also a winemaker. It was her suggestion that this rich starter be served with her effervescent Brut Rosé. Ingredients: 18 dried black mission figs (sometimes known as “mission figs”). prosciutto (about 1/4 pound), thinly sliced a quarter of a pound Toothpicks made with Humboldt Fog Goat Cheese 18 dried black mission figs (sometimes known as “mission figs”). Method: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Remove the figs’ stems and cut a slice down one side of each fig.

Wrap each packed fig with half a piece of prosciutto and fasten with a toothpick before placing on a baking sheet with a flat bottom.

It should be noted that other dried fig kinds can be utilized.

Larger ones must be chopped into bite-sized pieces before serving. In place of prosciutto, bacon is an excellent replacement. Make use of a third of a piece of thinly sliced bacon or a square of thick bacon for this recipe. Brie baked with extra virgin olive oil and rosemary

New Zealand Green-Lipped Mussels with Crusty Bread

New Zealand mussels have dark brown/green shells with a green lip around the edge of their shells, which distinguishes them from other mussels. They are one of the most massive mussel species in the planet. Sally Williams, a winemaker from Wither Hills in New Zealand, shared this recipe with us. It goes exceptionally well with Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand. Take a look at this recipe. Do you enjoy experimenting with different food and wine pairings? Take a look at all of our food and wine recommendations.

Cheers!

About The California Wine Club

Since 1990, it has been the objective of our wine club to assist artisan winemakers in sharing their small-batch wines with wine connoisseurs all around the world. At The California Wine Club, we happen to believe that these wines simply taste better than the mass-produced wines that now dominate the retail aisles. We visit the wineries and meet the families and winemakers who are responsible for the wines, after which we invite them to taste their favorite wines with our wine club members and other guests.

In the event that quality and customer service are important to you and you’ve been looking for a wine of the month club to check out, we encourage you to give us a try and get to know the artisan wineries that we showcase.

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