What Dessert Goes Well With Apricot Honey Wine

Quick Answer: What Dessert Goes Well With Apricot Honey Wine?

Food and wine writer Siobhan Wallace has been publishing articles on the subject for more than a decade. Since she has broken far too many wine stems, she prefers to sip her wine from stemless glasses. In addition to being a freelance writer, Kate Dingwall has written on cuisine, beverages, and travel for several publications. She is located in Toronto and has obtained a Level III certificate from the WineSpirits Education Trust (WSET). For this piece, she conducted interviews with four wine experts:

  • Siobhan Wallace has been a food and wine writer for more than a decade. She’s a lover of stemless wine glasses now that she’s broken one too many wine stems. Kate Dingwall, the author of this essay and the person who updated it, is a freelance writer whose work focuses on food, beverages, and travel. She is located in Toronto and possesses a Level III certificate from the WineSpirits Education Trust. For this story, she spoke with four wine specialists.

How do you pair wine with dessert?

In order to avoid any bitter aftertaste when matching wine with sweet dessert, it is advisable to pick a wine that is sweeter than the dessert itself. According to our enthralling guide on acidity in wine, sugar increases acidity, which is why dry wines taste harsh and sharp when served with sweet meals.

What do I do with apricots?

Following that, we’ve compiled a collection of our favorite apricot-themed recipes to brighten up your mid-summer meal.

  1. Here’s a collection of our favorite apricot-themed dishes to add a little sweetness to your mid-summer meal planning.

What dessert goes best with Pinot Noir?

Dark chocolate and pinot noir are two of my favorite things. Choose a bottle that has cherry, raspberry, or currant flavors and ends with a perfume that suits your taste preferences. Those flavors will go wonderfully with the bitterness of dark chocolate. Dark chocolate is also available in a variety of flavors. Consider chocolate-covered strawberries, chocolate mousse, or rich brownies as examples of decadent desserts.

What is a good cheap dessert wine?

Sweet, fruity, and low-cost wines to try out this summer.

  • Among the wines to try: Graffigna Centenario Pinot Grigio White Wine
  • Gallo Family Vineyards White Zinfandel
  • And Schmitt Sohne Relax “Cool Red” Wine. Rating 7.5
  • Fresita Sparkling Wine
  • Boone’s Farm Sangria
  • Schmitt Sohne, Relax, “Blue”
  • Boone’s Farm Sangria Rating: 8
  • NVY Envy Passion Fruit
  • Nova Tickled Pink Moscato

What is a good dessert wine for beginners?

Among the wines to try: Graffigna Centenario Pinot Grigio White Wine; Gallo Family Vineyards White Zinfandel; and Schmitt Sohne Relax “Cool” Red Wine. “Blue” Schmitt Sohne Schmitt Sohne Relax Schmitt Sohne Relax Schmitt Sohne Relax Schmitt Sohne Relax Schmitt Sohne Relax Schmitt Sohne Relax “Blue” Schmitt Sohne Relax Schmitt Sohne Relax “Blue” Schmitt Sohne Relax Schmitt Sohne Relax Schmitt Sohne Relax “Blue” Nova Tickled Pink Moscato has an 8-point rating; NVY Envy Passion Fruit receives a 7-point rating.

What fruit goes well with wine?

Important Points to Keep in Mind When Pairing

Fruit Wine
Strawberries, raspberries, fraises de bois, white peaches, apricots or apples Bourgueil
Pears, plums, dried fruit Bordeaux
Apples, pears, peaches Cabernet
Seedless grapes, peaches, lady apples, blueberries Champagne

What dessert goes best with red wine?

Dessert and Wine Pairings are available.

  • The traditional pairing of oatmeal cookies with Pinot Noir
  • Dark chocolate and Cabernet Sauvignon are two of the most basic flavors. Salted Caramel Keto Pie and Port Wine make for a sweet pairing. Vegan Toffee and Pecan Cake with Shiraz
  • Vegan Toffee and Pecan Cake with Shiraz
  • Budget-Friendly: Strawberry Cheesecake with Ruby Port
  • No-Bake Strawberry Cheesecake with Ruby Port

Should dessert wine be served chilled?

White dessert wines are often served slightly chilled, however they can be served excessively cold if they are served too quickly. Red dessert wines should be served at room temperature or slightly cooled to enhance their flavor.

Can I freeze apricots raw?

White dessert wines are often served slightly chilled, however they can be served excessively cold if they are served too quickly. When served at room temperature or slightly cooled, red dessert wines are best.

What does apricot taste good with?

White dessert wines are normally served slightly chilled, however they might be served excessively cold if they are served too quickly. Red dessert wines should be served at room temperature or slightly cooled to complement the dessert.

What to do with under ripe apricots?

If you put unripe fruit in a paper bag, the ethylene gas that is normally released will be trapped and the ripening process will be expedited.

The addition of an apple or a banana will significantly speed up this procedure. Make careful to store the bag in a cool, dry location; storing the bag in a warm location can cause the fruit to deteriorate.

What dessert goes well with Pinot Grigio?

A light, crisp Pinot Noir is the ideal pairing. Because Pinot Grigio is on the drier half of the white wine spectrum, a dessert that is too sweet can overpower its more delicate aromas. Choose mascarpone-stuffed crepes or custards such as crème brulee instead of chocolate ganache for dessert instead; and if all else fails, a cheese platter will suffice.

What snacks go with red wine?

There were several excellent suggestions for snack and wine pairings for my wine and cheese board as a result of this article, including:

  • PAIRINGS: Strawberries and pinot noir
  • Chocolate chip cookies and riesling
  • Candied pecans or walnuts and riesling
  • Pepperoni and riesling
  • Sweet potato chips and moscato

What candy goes with wine?

Choose from one of the following flavors if you’re seeking for the perfect candy wine taste pairing:

  • Choose from one of the following taste combinations if you’re seeking for the ideal candy wine flavor combo.

Apricot Frangipane Tartelettes & Asti-Pair Dessert & Wine

Tartelettes made with apricots and frangipane are the ideal accompaniment to sparkling champagne. “Wine is a component of the food chain.there is nothing inherently harmful about it,” said Julia Child, in her distinct voice. “It’s a component of the meal.” There’s a reason why I’m so taken with that woman! We have a wonderful set of pals who we refer to as our “wine group.” The organization is made up of six couples, with each pair “officially” hosting once a year on their property. The number of non-official get-togethers is enormous (and there are many of them).

It’s always a good time on Friday nights!

For our most recent get-together, we decided on the subject of “After Dinner.” It’s no surprise that I enjoy after-dinner (dessert) treats, as they’re my favorite.

So that we could appreciate the wines as part of the overall “after dinner” experience, or to put it another way, as part of the “food chain,” as Julia would say It is recommended by experts that when matching food and wine, that the meal and wine should have similar body, acidity, and depth of taste.

  1. When drinking wine with a dessert that is too sweet or extremely rich, you don’t want the wine to taste sour and astringent.
  2. A French Sauternes (Château Guiraud 2009) would be served next, followed by Legends Estates Cabernet Franc Ice Wine from Canada’s Niagara Peninsula.
  3. Once the wine menu had been finalized, I began working on the dessert menu.
  4. I thought it was a wonderful light wine that was a touch sweet, but the sweetness was countered by the fruit aromas and acidity in the wine.
  5. Despite the fact that short dough is not excessively sweet, tarts make an excellent pairing with dessert wines.
  6. Asti would be paired with Apricot Frangipane Tartelettes, which would be delicious.
  7. The apricot and honey aromas brought out the fruit notes in the wine without overpowering them, and the bubbles in the wine cut through the buttery filling wonderfully.

I felt the Apricot Frangipane Tartelettes would go well with our second wine of the evening, the Sauternes, which we were serving with them. Further details will be provided in my upcoming post.

Ingredients

  • 12 of the recipe Recipe for Short Dough: 1/2 cup granulated sugar, 2 oz (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted to room temperature, 1 big egg, 1/2 cup ground almonds (about 3 oz), 1/2 teaspoon almond extract, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract, 1/2 teaspoon black rum, 15 ripe fresh apricots and 1/2 cup honey.

Instructions

  1. Using an electric mixer, cream the granulated sugar and butter until light and fluffy
  2. Mix in the egg until everything is well-combined. Combine the almonds, extracts, and rum in a mixing bowl. Transfer to a small bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate while you’re putting together the tart shells.

To Assemble the Tarts

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit convection or 350 degrees Fahrenheit normal. Make a very thin roll of the short dough, less than 1/8″ thick
  2. Make 3″ circles to line the bottoms of 2.5″ tartelette pans. Each tartelette should have its bottom pricked with a fork. Bake the empty shells for about 10 minutes, or until they are just beginning to brown. Cool the shells on a wire rack to prevent them from cracking. Fill each shell with 1 spoonful of the chilled frangipane filling
  3. Set aside. Remove the pits from the apricots by peeling them and cutting them in half. One apricot half should be thinly sliced, and the slices should be arranged in a spiral pattern over the frangipane filling of one of the shells. Make a second batch with any remaining apricots and tartelettes. Bake until the filling is done and the apricots are just starting to color, about 30 minutes. Allow the tartelettes to cool for about 10 minutes before gently removing them from the pans. To liquify the honey, place it in a microwave-safe bowl and heat for about 1 minute. Warm the honey and use it to lightly brush the tops of each tartelette.

You might also like:Sauternes Chocolate Almond CakeIce WineSauternes Chocolate Almond Cake Dessert with Wine: What to Serve with It

Wine Pairings for Desserts

Crispy Dulce de Leche Dulce de Leche Crispies Featured image courtesy of Lucy Schaeffer Dessert dishes that pair well with wine, such as raspberry jam bomboloni and a fizzy effervescent red wine, are included.

Granny Smith Apple and Brown Butter Custard Tart

Granny Smith Apples Kate Neumann’s Apple and Brown Butter Custard Pie is a delicious custard filled with caramelized apples and baked in a buttery tart shell that is infused with the fragrance of browned butter. Ice wine is recommended as a wine pairing. Riesling, Vidal Blanc, and Vignoles grapes are typically used to make this wine, which is picked after the first winter frost. Ice wines are silky and creamy, lusciously sweet and packed with concentrated flavor, yet they have a lively acidity that keeps them tasting crisp and refreshing.

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Double-Chocolate Bundt Cake with Ganache Glaze

Bundt Cake with Ganache Glaze made with double chocolate. Many Bundt cakes are heavy and buttery, but this one is unexpectedly light and very moist, thanks to the silky chocolate glaze that coats the top and sides. Vintage Port is recommended as a wine pairing. Vintage ports are huge wines with black-fruit flavors and robust tannins when they’re young; pair them with something as intense, such as a rich, dark-chocolate dessert or a blue cheese like Stilton, to bring out the best in each other.

Raspberry Jam Bomboloni

Bomboloni with Raspberry Jam (photo courtesy of Quentin Bacon) Immediately after they come out of the frying pan, Kate Neumann fills the doughnut holes with fruit jams or chocolate ganache and then rolls them in sugar and spices. Brachetto d’ Acqui, a red wine from Italy, is recommended as a pairing. Wine from Piedmont that is effervescent and not too sweet, with flavors of wildberries and fizz, is an excellent way to cap off any meal with a crisp finish. It goes well with any berry treat, whether it’s a raspberry pie, a blackberry crumble, or a handful of freshly picked wild strawberries from the field.

Greek Yogurt Panna Cotta with Honey-Glazed Apricots

Panna Cotta with Honey-Glazed Apricots made with Greek yogurt This cold, delicate treat, according to Kate Neumann, has a citrus flavor “Custard’s characteristics are retained without the egginess. The tanginess is enhanced by the use of Greek yogurt.” Orange Muscat is a good wine to pair with this dish. Sometimes, the Mediterranean grape is mistaken with the more popular Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains, which is a hybrid of the two. It is used to make delectable dessert wines. Fresh fruit, particularly tangerine and orange flowers, as well as desserts with a tangy edge, pair well with this wine’s flowery scents and light to medium body.

Dulce de Leche Crispies

Crispy Dulce de Leche Dulce de Leche Crispies Featured image courtesy of Lucy Schaeffer Marcia Kiesel creates a sophisticated spin on the popular Rice Krispies Treats by cleverly substituting marshmallows with dulce de leche, a Latin American dessert sauce, and then adding even more crunch with toasted, sliced almonds. This dish has a caramel flavor, is nutty, and is quite crunchy.

Madeira is the perfect wine to pair with this dish. When mixing sweets with dessert wines, it’s easy for the sweetness to overpower the taste senses. Instead, choose for a wine that is a little lighter and less sugary than the dessert you’ll be serving.

Wine and Dessert Pairing Suggestions

Restaurants, publications, and experts all offer suggestions for food and wine pairings, and combining a drink with dessert is just another way to enjoy a meal even more. Every day, more and more home chefs, performers, and chefs are sharing their thoughts on how to pair the rich tastes of wine with their favorite sweets and desserts. As a student in an online baking school, you may be confident in your ability to keep up with the latest fashion. Here are some suggestions for wine and dessert combinations that you might utilize at your next gathering: Dark chocolate and pinot noir are two of my favorite things.

  • Some versions of this red wine have a rich, dark spicy flavor with floral scents, while others are light and herbaceous in flavor.
  • Those flavors will go wonderfully with the bitterness of dark chocolate.
  • Consider chocolate-covered strawberries, chocolate mousse, or rich brownies as dessert options to consider.
  • The grapes that are used to make this white wine may be found in a number of locations across the world, including Germany and Austria, among others.
  • These flavors will complement your pie well.
  • Some bottles, for example, feature flavors such as peach, citrus, and flowery.
  • With a glass of riesling, the sweet flavors of apple and vanilla ice cream will be just wonderful.
See also:  What Dessert Wine To Serve With Coconut Cake

You may discover tastes such as toasted nut, black cherry, and pepper in these variations.

Cake made with cinnamon and ginger, then topped with roasted almonds and caramel sauce, is an excellent dessert.

Muscat and Greek yogurt are two of my favorite things.

Muscat, also known as moscato in some locations, is available in a variety of flavors ranging from sweet and spicy to dry and buttery.

To make a panna cotta out of Greek yogurt, combine it with honey and apricots and bake it until set.

Despite the fact that it is sweet yet mild, this exquisite delight might be overshadowed by some wines. A excellent muscat, on the other hand, will enhance the taste of the panna cotta rather than masking it completely. Posts that are recommended

The Ultimate Fruit Flavor Pairing Chart

Apple Apricot, blackberry, cherry, cranberry, currant, date, lychee, mango, orange, pear, pineapple, plum, pomegranate, pumpkin, quince Allspice, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, ginger, nutmeg, rosemary, star anise, thyme Almond, chestnut, hazelnut, pecan, pine nut, pistachio, walnut Armagnac, bourbon, brandy, calvados, cognac, Cointreau, Kirsch, Madeira, rum, sherry, vermouth Caramel, maple syrup, molasses, vanilla
Apricot Apple, banana, blackberry, blueberry, cherry, coconut, cranberry, lemon, orange, peach, pineapple, plum, prune, raspberry, strawberry Cardamom, cayenne, cinnamon, coriander, ginger, nutmeg, rosemary, saffron Almond, hazelnut, pine nut, pistachio, walnut Amaretto, brandy, cognac, Kirsch, orange liqueur, rum Caramel, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, vanilla
Banana Apricot, blackberry, blueberry, cherry, coconut, date, guava, lemon, lime, mango, orange, papaya, passion fruit, pineapple, pomegranate, raspberry, strawberry Allspice, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, macadamia, nutmeg Cashew, hazelnut, peanut, pecan, pistachio, walnut Armagnac, banana liqueur, brandy, calvados, cognac, Kirsch, Madeira, rum Caramel, chocolate, coffee, crème fraîche, honey, maple syrup, molasses, vanilla
Blackberry Apple, apricot, banana, blueberry, lemon, mango, melon, nectarine, orange, peach, plum, raspberry, strawberry, watermelon Cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mint Almond, hazelnut Brandy, champagne, Cointreau, Grand Marnier, Kirsch, orange liqueur Caramel, crème fraîche, honey, mascarpone, vanilla
Blueberry Apple, apricot, banana, blackberry, fig, lemon, mango, melon, nectarine, orange, peach, pear, pineapple, raspberry, rhubarb, strawberry, watermelon Allspice, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, lavender, mint, nutmeg Almond, hazelnut, pecan, pine nut, walnut Cognac, Kirsch, orange liqueur, port, rum, triple sec Crème fraîche, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, molasses, ricotta, vanilla
Cantaloupe Grapefruit, melon, raspberry Basil, cilantro, ginger, mint, star anise, tarragon Port
Cherry Apricot, coconut, lemon, melon, nectarine, orange, peach, plum, quince, raspberry Allspice, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, ginger, sage, thyme Almond, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, walnut Amaretto, Armagnac, bourbon, brandy, cassis, Grand Marnier, kirsch, red wine, rum, vodka Caramel, chocolate, coffee, crème fraîche, honey, mascarpone, vanilla
Coconut Apricot, banana, blackberry, cherry, date, grapefruit, guava, kiwi, kumquat, lemon, lime, lychee, mango, orange, papaya, passion fruit, pineapple Allspice, basil, cardamom, cilantro, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, ginger, Kaffir leaf, lemongrass, mint, nutmeg Almond, brazil nut, cashew, macadamia, peanut, pistachio Rum Caramel, chocolate, crème fraîche, honey, mascarpone, rose water, vanilla
Cranberry Apple, apricot, lemon, lime, orange, peach, pear, pumpkin, quince, tangerine Allspice, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, star anise, thyme Almond, hazelnut, pistachio, walnut Cognac, Grand Marnier, white wine Honey, maple syrup, vanilla
Date Apple, apricot, banana, coconut, lemon, lime, orange, prune, quince Cinnamon, ginger, rosemary, thyme Almond, hazelnut, macadamia, pecan, pistachio, walnut Armagnac, brandy, red wine, rum Caramel, chocolate, coffee, crème fraîche, maple syrup, mascarpone, orange blossom water, vanilla
Grape Apple, lemon, pear, raspberry, strawberry Cayenne, cumin, ginger, mint, paprika, rosemary Almond, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, walnut Brandy, cognac, rum Honey, white chocolate
Grapefruit Avocado, banana, coconut, lemon, lime, melon, orange, papaya, pineapple, pomegranate, raspberry, strawberry, tomato Basil, ginger, mint, rosemary, star anise, tarragon, thyme Cashew, hazelnut, macadamia, pecan, walnut Campari, champagne, gin, Grand Marnier, port, rum, tequila, vodka Caramel, crème fraîche, grenadine, honey, vanilla
Guava Banana, coconut, lemon, lime, orange, passion fruit, pineapple, strawberry Ginger Cashew, macadamia Rum White chocolate, honey, mascarpone
Honeydew Blackberry, cantaloupe, grapefruit, lemon, lime, nectarine, peach, strawberry Basil, cardamom, coriander, cumin, ginger, mint, tarragon Champagne Coconut milk, honey
Kiwi Banana, cherry, coconut, grapefruit, lemon, lime, lychee, mango, orange, papaya, passion fruit, pineapple, strawberry Hazelnut, macadamia Kirsch, rum Chocolate, honey
Kumquat Coconut, cranberry, date, lemon, lime, mango, orange, papaya, persimmon, pineapple, pomegranate, pumpkin, quince, strawberry Cayenne, cinnamon, ginger, mace, mint, nutmeg Hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, walnut Brandy, rum, white wine Caramel, chocolate, honey, vanilla
Lemon Apple, apricot, banana, blackberry, blueberry, cherry, coconut, cranberry, date, gooseberry, grapefruit, grape, guava, kiwi, lime, mango, nectarine, orange, papaya, passion fruit, peach, pear, persimmon, plum, prune, quince, raspberry, rhubarb, tangerine Basil, bay leaf, cardamom, cayenne, cinnamon, ginger, mint, oregano, parsley, poppy seed, rosemary, sage, thyme Almond, chestnut, hazelnut, pecan, pine nut, pistachio, walnut Gin, orange liqueur, red wine, rum, vodka Caramel, chocolate, coffee, crème fraîche, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, vanilla
Lime Apple, apricot, avocado, coconut, date, gooseberry, grapefruit, guava, honeydew, kiwi, lemon, mango, orange, papaya, passion fruit, plum, raspberry, strawberry, tomato Cilantro, ginger, mint Hazelnut, macadamia, peanut, pecan Rum, tequila, vodka Caramel, coconut milk, crème fraîche, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, vanilla, white chocolate
Lychee Blackberry, coconut, honeydew, kiwi, lemon, lime, mango, orange, passion fruit, pear, pineapple, plum, raspberry Ginger Rum Honey
Mango Apple, avocado, banana, blackberry, blueberry, coconut, grapefruit, kiwi, kumquat, lemon, lime, orange, papaya, passion fruit, pineapple, raspberry, strawberry Basil, cayenne, cilantro, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mint, nutmeg, star anise Almond, cashew, macadamia Amaretto, champagne, Kirsch, orange liqueur, rum, sake, vodka Caramel, coconut milk, coffee, crème fraîche, honey, mascarpone, vanilla, white chocolate
Nectarine Apricot, blackberry, blueberry, cherry, cranberry, lemon, orange, peach, plum, raspberry, strawberry Allspice, cinnamon, ginger, mint, nutmeg Almond, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio Brandy, champagne, Kirsch, orange liqueur, peach liqueur, red wine, white wine Caramel, chocolate, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, vanilla
Orange Apple, apricot, avocado, banana, blackberry, blueberry, cherry, coconut, cranberry, date, grape, grapefruit, guava, grapefruit, kumquat, lemon, lime, mango,nectarine, papaya, passion fruit, peach, pear, persimmon, pineapple, plum, pomegranate, prune, pumpkin, quince, raspberry, rhubarb, strawberry, tomato Basil, cardamom, cilantro, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, ginger, mint, nutmeg, paprika, parsley, poppy seed, rosemary, saffron, star anise, thyme Almond, chestnut, hazelnut, macadamia, pecan, pine nut, pistachio, walnut Almond liqueur, Amaretto, Armagnac, brandy, cognac, Kirsch, orange liqueur, red wine, rum, tequila, vodka, white wine Caramel, chocolate, coffee, grenadine, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, vanilla
Papaya Banana, coconut, grapefruit, kiwi, kumquat, lemon, lime, mango, nectarine, orange, passion fruit, peach, pineapple, raspberry, strawberry Cilantro, cinnamon, ginger, mint Cashew, macadamia, peanut Port Caramel, honey, vanilla, white chocolate
Passion fruit Banana, coconut, kiwi, lemon, lime, mango, orange, papaya, peach, pear, pineapple, strawberry Cilantro, ginger Almond, cashew, macadamia Champagne, Cointreau, ice wine, rum, tequila Caramel, chocolate, vanilla
Peach Apple, apricot, blackberry, blueberry, cherry, coconut, lemon, lime, nectarines, orange, papaya, passion fruit, pineapple, plum, raspberry, strawberry Allspice, basil, bay leaf, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mace, mint, nutmeg, saffron, star anise, tarragon, thyme Almond, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, walnut Bourbon, brandy, Calvados, Cassis, champagne, cognac, Cointreau, Grand Marnier, Kirsch, Madeira, port, red wine, rum, Vin Santo, whiskey, white wine Brown sugar, caramel, chocolate, crème fraîche, grenadine, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, molasses, vanilla
Pear Apple, apricot, blackberry, blueberry, cherry, cranberry, date, lemon, orange, passion fruit, prune, quince, raspberry, rhubarb, strawberry Allspice, basil, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mace, mint, nutmeg, parsley, rosemary, star anise Almond, chestnut, hazelnut, macadamia, peanut, pecan, pine nut, pistachio, walnut Bourbon, brandy, Calvados, crème de cassis, champagne, Grand Marnier, kirsch, pear brandy, port, red wine, rum, whiskey Caramel, chocolate, crème fraîche, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, vanilla
Persimmon Apple, avocado, grape, kiwi, kumquat, lemon, orange, pear, pomegranate Cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mace, nutmeg Almond, cashew, hazelnut, pecan, walnut Bourbon, brandy, cognac, Kirsch, sweet wine Caramel, coffee, honey, maple syrup, vanilla, white chocolate
Pineapple Apricot, avocado, banana, coconut, grapefruit, kiwi, kumquat, lemon, lime, mango, orange, papaya, passion fruit, pomegranate, raspberry, strawberry Allspice, basil, cardamom, cilantro, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mint, rosemary, saffron, star anise Cashew, macadamia, pistachio, walnut Brandy, Cointreau, Grand Marnier, Kirsch, orange liqueur, rum, sweet wine Caramel, chocolate, honey, maple syrup, vanilla
Plum Apricot, cherry, lemon, nectarine, orange, peach, raspberry, strawberry Allspice, almond, bay leaf, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, ginger, mace, mint, nutmeg, sage, thyme Hazelnut, pecan, walnut Brandy, gin, Kirsch, rum, whiskey, red wine, sweet wine Caramel, crème fraîche, honey, maple syrup, vanilla
Pomegranate Apple, avocado, banana, coconut, grapefruit, kumquat, lemon, lime, orange Allspice, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, ginger, mint, nutmeg, parsley, turmeric Almond, hazelnut, pine nut, walnut Port, tequila, vodka Honey, white chocolate
Pumpkin Apple, coconut, cranberry, kumquat, lemon, lime, orange Allspice, bay leaf, cayenne, cilantro, cinnamon, cloves, cumin, ginger, mace, nutmeg, rosemary, sage, thyme Hazelnut, pecan, pine nut, walnut Brandy, cognac, orange liqueur, rum, white wine Caramel, crème fraîche, honey, maple syrup, molasses, vanilla, white chocolate
Quince Apple, cherry, cranberry, date, kumquat, lemon, orange, pear, raspberry Bay leaf, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, nutmeg, star anise Almond, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, walnut Armagnac, brandy, Calvados, red wine, whiskey, white wine Caramel, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, vanilla
Raspberry Apricot, blackberry, blueberry, grapefruit, grape, lemon, lime, mango, nectarine, orange, peach, pear, pineapple, plum, quince, rhubarb, strawberry Cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mint, star anise, thyme Almond, hazelnut, macadamia, peanut, pecan, pine nut, pistachio Brandy, champagne, cognac, Cointreau, Framboise, Grand Marnier, Kirsch, orange liqueur, red wine, rum, tequila Caramel, chocolate, crème fraîche, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, vanilla
Rhubarb Apple, apricot, blood orange, grapefruit, lemon, lime, nectarine, peach, plum, raspberry, strawberry Bay leaf, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mint, nutmeg Almond, hazelnut, pecan Brandy, Grand Marnier, Kirsch, port, white wine Caramel, crème fraîche, grenadine, honey, maple syrup, mascarpone, vanilla, white chocolate
Strawberry Apple, apricot, banana, blackberry, blueberry, boysenberry, gooseberry, grape, grapefruit, guava, kumquat, lemon, lime, mango, melon, orange, papaya, passion fruit, peach, pineapple, plum, pomegranate, raspberry, rhubarb Cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, ginger, mint, nutmeg Almond, hazelnut, peanut, pecan, pine nut, pistachio, walnut Amaretto, brandy, champagne, cognac, elderflower liqueur, Grand Marnier, Kirsch, port, red wine, rosé, rum, sake, sherry, white wine Caramel, chocolate, crème fraîche, honey, vanilla

How to Pair Wine with Chocolate (and Other Desserts)

Discover more about our review method here. Our editors independently investigate, test, and suggest the finest goods. We may gain a commission if you make a purchase after clicking on one of our links. What’s the difference between wine and chocolate? There is no longer any reason to do so, thanks to the abundance of delectable dessert wines available. Contrary to common perception, your favorite bottle of red wine is definitely not the best pairing for your favorite sweet treat. However, with so many different alternatives available, you’re sure to discover the ideal bottle to complement your dessert.

What Is the Most Important Rule for Pairing Wine with Chocolate?

Our editors independently study, test, and select the finest goods; you can discover more about our review process by visiting our website. Purchases bought through our affiliate links may result in revenue for us. What’s the difference between wine and chocolate, anyway? There is no longer a necessity to do so, thanks to the abundance of delectable dessert wines available. Contrary to common perception, your favorite bottle of red wine is definitely not the best pairing for your favorite sweet treat.

See also:  How To Serve Dessert Wine Temperature

This is a list of the most important things to remember.

Can I Pair Dry Wines with Chocolate?

Dry wines, on the whole, don’t pair well with chocolate, for the most part. If you want to match wine with chocolate (or other sweet delights), always remember that the former should be sweeter than the latter, according to the golden rule mentioned above. Exceptions can be made in rare cases (for example, Beaujolais or Zinfandel), but we recommend erring on the side of caution and opting for a bottle of sweet wine rather than a sweet wine.

Do Certain Wines Go Better with Milk Chocolate Versus Dark Chocolate?

In a way, yes! Certain wines will pair well with different types of chocolate (see our quick reference guide below), while milk and dark chocolate pairings are more interchangeable than white chocolate pairings (see our quick reference guide below). The sweetness of the chocolate is responsible for this.

Are Fortified Wines Good with Chocolate?

Absolutely! Fortified wines are some of the greatest matches with chocolate that can be found. While many white-grape-based fortified wines (think lighter sherry varieties) pair well with both white and darker chocolates, we recommend conserving red fortified wines (such as port) for drinking with milk or dark chocolate instead of the other way around.

Which Wines Pair Best with Chocolates That Contain Nuts or Other Fillings?

It is dependent on the type of chocolate. Before thinking about the fillings, we recommend starting with the basic chocolate (white, milk, or dark). Remember that coming up with your own unique and imaginative wine and chocolate combinations can be a lot of fun as well. Do you happen to have a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup handy? Try mixing it with a sweet sparkling red wine for a taste that is reminiscent of peanut butter and jelly.

Do you like chocolates with caramel filling? Consider mixing it with wines (tawny port, for example) that have similar caramel flavors for an out-of-this-world experience. The options are virtually limitless!

A Quick Guide

Wines that pair with white chocolate include the following: Late-harvest Moscato d’Asti (Moscato d’Asti Late-Harvestriesling) Sauternes gewurztraminer, for example. Ice wine is a type of wine that is frozen (eiswein) Wines that go well with milk chocolate include: Portuguese: (ruby or tawny) Madeira is a small island off the coast of Portugal (malmsey) Brachetto d’acquiRutherglenmuscato d’acqui d’acqui Sherry (amontillado or oloroso) is a kind of sherry. Wines that pair with dark chocolate include the following: Natural wine (banyuls/maury) with a sweet taste Sherry from Pedro Ximenez Recioto della Valpolicella (Valpolicella Recioto) Vin santo (holy wine) (Italy) Here are six different bottles to try.

Sauternes and apricot cake

Time:Serves:6 This fine-crumbed cake is perfumed with sweet dessert wine and adorned with sticky fall fruits for a festive presentation. Photograph courtesy of William Meppem DietaryDairy-free A sweet dessert wine, such as a late-harvest riesling or semillon, lends this cake its fine texture, while dried apricots enhance the cake’s subtle fruitiness. Adapted from a dish from Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California.

Ingredients

225g apricots that have been gently dried 2 tablespoons sultanas 2 tablespoons currants 2 tablespoons of honey Wine for dessert, 375ml sweet dessert wine 3 quail eggs 150 g castor sugar and 150 mL extra-virgin olive oil 180g ordinary flour, sifted12 teaspoon baking powder 1 tablespoon grated orange zest icing sugar to be used for dusting

Method

1. Bring the 125g apricots, sultanas, currants, honey, and 225ml dessert wine to a boil in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook over high heat until thick and syrupy, then remove from heat and put aside. Set aside the remaining 100g apricots, which you may purée in a food processor (adding a dash of boiling water if required). 2. Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Celsius (160C fan-forced). Oil and line a 20cm square baking sheet with baking paper with a teaspoon of the extra-virgin olive oil you saved.

Using an electric mixer, combine 150ml dessert wine, olive oil, orange zest, and apricot puree until thoroughly combined.

Cook the cake for 40 minutes, or until the cake tester comes out clean, after pouring the mixture into the baking pan.

How to Pair Port Wine with Dessert

1Bring to a boil the 125g apricots, the sultanas, the currants, the honey, and the 225ml dessert wine. Remove from heat and put aside until the sauce is thick and syrupy. Set aside the remaining 100g apricots, which you may purée in a food processor (adding a dash of boiling water if needed). Oven temperature should be set at 180 degrees Celsius (160C fan-forced). Oil and line a 20cm square baking sheet with baking paper with a teaspoon of the extra-virgin olive oil. The eggs and sugar should be combined in a large mixing basin for 3 minutes or until pale in color.

In a separate bowl, sift together the flour and baking powder and whisk until just mixed.

Cook the cake for 40 minutes, or until the cake tester comes out clean, after pouring the batter into the tin. Allow to cool before sprinkling with icing sugar and serving with the syrupy dried fruits on the side!

What is Port?

Port wine is a type of fortified wine. In Portugal, it’s known as Port since it’s made entirely from grapes grown in the Douro Valley, which has been designated as a protected area. It is impossible for True Port to originate from any other point on the planet. And the port city at the foot of the Douro Valley is known as.Porto, of course. The oldest written record of port dates back to 1678, marking the beginning of the beverage’s meteoric rise in popularity in the United Kingdom. For most of the 17th and 18th centuries, England and France were involved in The Hundred Years’ War (also known as the Hundred Years’ Conflict).

Portugal is the next stop.

This additional fortification not only increased the amount of alcohol in the drink, but it also boosted its sweetness.

As a result, we still have port till this day!

Types of Port:

There are three primary varieties of port: Ruby, Tawny, Rosé, and White. Ruby is the most expensive of the three. Colors and aging processes are represented by these symbols. Ruby, Tawny, and Rosé are all created from the same selection of purple grapes as their counterparts in the red wine world. White ports, on the other hand, are prepared from grapes that are, well, white. There are around 30 different types of Port grapes, which explains why there is such a wide range of Port styles and flavors!

Ruby

Ruby ports are the newest and most vibrant of all the port kinds. They have a robust fruit character and intense red hues, despite the fact that they have been matured for only a short period of time.

  • Ruby Port – The most cheap of all the ports, it is a deep red wine that is highly sweet and delicious. It is also the youngest of all the ports. Reserve– Reserve bottles contain only the highest-quality port grapes (think of it as “special ruby”)
  • Reserve bottles are limited in quantity. Late Bottled Vintage (“LBV”) is a term used to describe a vintage that has been stored for a long period of time. Reserve– This port is still a ruby port and is intended to be consumed young. However, it has been matured in a barrel for 4 to 6 years, which accounts for the “late bottle” flavor. Vintage ports are made from only one year’s harvest and are fermented in massive steel vats for two years before being bottled. However, they continue to age in the bottle and can improve and gain in value the longer they are stored. Vintage ports may mature in the bottle for up to 50 years, however 20 years is probably the most frequent amount of time. In order to be certified as “vintage,” only the greatest ports are picked, and they must go through a rigorous certification procedure.
  • Crusted Port– a combination of distinct Vintage Ports that generally contains sediment and must be decanted
  • A blend of different Vintage Ports
  • The term “Single Quinta” refers to a vintage ruby port that comes from only one vineyard (think of it as the “single malt scotch of ports”)
  • The term “Single Quinta” refers to a vintage port that comes from only one vineyard.

Photograph courtesy of Shutterstock

Tawny

Tawny ports are all matured in oak barrels for a minimum of two years before being released. They begin to lose their vibrant red coloration and begin to take on more caramel and honey hues. Every few years, they are re-topped with brandy, which contributes to the color alteration as well as the brilliant flavor.

  • Colheita is a wine created from grapes that have all been picked in the same vintage (meaning the same year), and it is typically matured for at least 10 years. Tawny 10-40– Tawny ports that have been matured for a certain number of years. Because they are blends of different vintages, the age indication on the bottle indicates the average age of the port in the bottle. Vintages from decades ago may be included

White Port

They are typically matured for at least 10 years, if not more, and are created from grapes that were all picked in the same vintage (meaning the same year). Ten to forty-year-old tawny ports that have been aged for the specified period of time. Because they are blends of different vintages, the age designation on the label indicates the average age of the port in the container. Vintages from several decades ago may be included in this category.

Rosé Port

Colheita is a wine created from grapes that were all picked in the same vintage (meaning the same year), and it is typically matured for at least 10 years. Tawny 10-40– Tawny ports that have been aged for the designated number of years.

Given that they are blends of different vintages, the age designation indicates the average age of the port at the time it was bottled. Vintages from several decades ago may be included.

What does Port Taste Like?

Let’s leave talks on really rare and speciality bottles, such as Vintage Ports, to the sidelines. Those are much too intricate to be covered in a single article. If you are serving them with dessert, you are doing it incorrectly. Simply drink and enjoy yourself!) The majority of the ports with which you’ll be considering partnering will fall within the Ruby to Tawny group. Furthermore, the flavors range from rich red fruits such as raspberries, to caramel and almonds, to chocolate! Photograph courtesy of Shutterstock

Typical Ruby Flavors:

  • The following red fruits and spices are used: blackberries, raspberries, cherries, and plums
  • Cinnamon, clove, and chocolate

Typical Tawny Flavors:

It’s a little more complicated. More often than not, the younger the tawny, the more probable it is to taste of red fruit and spices. More dried fruit, nuts, and wood sweetness can be detected in older tawny port wines.

  • Dried Apricots and Raisins
  • Raspberry, Figs, Dried Apricots and Raisins
  • Cinnamon, Clove, White Pepper
  • Nuts: Almonds, Walnuts
  • Raspberry, Figs, Dried Apricots and Raisins Flavors derived from wood spice include: oak
  • Honey
  • Caramel
  • Toffee
  • Vanilla
  • Butterscotch
  • Graham cracker
  • And butterscotch.

Typical Rosé Flavors:

  • The following pink fruits are available: cranberries, strawberry, raspberry, rainier cherry, and watermelon. Caramel and honey are used as sweeteners. Floral arrangements include honeysuckle, jasmine, wildflowers, and tropical fruit arrangements.

Typical White Flavors:

  • Sugary flavors include citrus fruits such as oranges and apples, as well as toasted nuts such as hazelnuts and sliced almonds
  • Sweet flavors include caramel and honey.

General Port Pairing Tips:

  • The lighter fruits and creamier sweets that go well with older ports include lighter fruits and creamier desserts. Ports that are younger in age combine better with red fruits and chocolate

The lighter fruits and creamier desserts that go well with older ports are more subtle in flavor. Red fruits and chocolate go better with younger port wines; younger ports go better with younger wines.

Ruby Port w/ Cherry Pie

Ruby ports are bursting with brilliant red fruits such as cherries, raspberries, and plums, among others. With the fruit, these deep, rich fruity tastes are a fantastic pairing!

Port to Choose: Niepoort Ruby

I first purchased this since it was the only ruby port available in the shop. I was wrong. But Alex, the proprietor of my local wine shop, told me that “it’s fine.” As a result, I went for it. And he was absolutely correct! The scent is extremely different from the final taste in terms of complexity. You’ll experience notes of brown sugar, maple syrup, raisins, and overwhelming sweetness on the first sniff of this fragrance. A sip, on the other hand, rewards you with a glass brimming with dark fruit: plums, blackberries, raspberries, and black currants.

See also:  What Temperature To Serve Dessert Wine

It was clear that I overpoured, and we went from being tipsy to being roaring drunk to falling asleep on the couch in the period of approximately ten minutes.

Reserve w/Dark Chocolate Truffles

Reserve ruby ports are quite similar to ruby ports in general, with the exception that they are somewhat higher in quality. The fruity and spicy aromas are still quite prominent in the sauce. So they’re excellent for matching with chocolate, don’t you think? Although chocolate and red fruits such as raspberries, strawberries, and cherries might be tough to combine, we all know that they go together like peanut butter and jelly. Anyone up for some chocolate-covered strawberries? Because reserves are a touch more premium, combine them with a simple dark chocolate truffle to complete the experience.

The flavors of the fruit and spices will complement one another well.

LBV Reserve w/ Dark Chocolate Cake and Raspberry Sauce

Late bottle reserves are also ruby ports, and they are extremely comparable to a regular ruby port in terms of flavor and aroma. It is because of the additional age that some of the more caramel or dried fruit notes might develop. These characteristics make them an ideal choice for serving with somewhat more complicated sweets such as chocolate cake.

Toffee and caramel tones will merge smoothly with sweet cakes and will contribute to the creaminess of the cake. To bring up the fruity flavor even more, serve it with a raspberry sauce on the side.

Rosé Port w/ Strawberry Rhubarb Tart

Rosé ports are lighter in color than ruby ports, yet they are just as rich in fruit tastes as the latter. Pair them with a lighter fruit dessert to complete the meal. Because rosé ports frequently have a strawberry flavor, strawberries and rosé ports go together like peanut butter and jelly. I think it’s the perfect high point. My personal favorite is to include rhubarb since its tart flavor will balance out some of the sweeter ports used in this recipe. Photograph courtesy of Shutterstock

Tawny 10 w/ Classic Apple Pie and Caramel Sauce

A tawny aged 10 years or more will have the most evident fruit qualities, making it the greatest choice for pairing with apples or pears. In order to match the subtle nutty flavor and just-emerging caramel, an apple pie and a warm smooth caramel will be served together. This is a classic match, in my opinion.

Port to Choose: Quinta do Infantado Tawny Port 10 Year

Once again, the aroma is far more pleasant than the flavor. Among the flavors you’ll find caramel, toffee, coffee grounds, and a hint of orange peel. However, the flavors of apple and toffee dominate the glass, with traces of oak and soaked raisins thrown in for good measure.

Tawny 20 w/ Pecan Pie and Creamy Bourbon Sauce

The tastes of nut and caramel become more prominent as you progress into the 20-year-old tawny port category. The vanilla, toffee, and fig notes are just just beginning to come into sharper focus. This is the ideal time to serve with a dessert that is heavy on the nuts. Pecan pies are often highly sweet, so tawnies that are more than a year old are a preferable choice. As a result, the sweetness of the fruits will be heightened by the wood, making the combination less overpowering. Photograph courtesy of Shutterstock

White Port w/ Banana Creme Brûlée

The tastes of nut and caramel become more prominent as you progress through the 20-year-old tawny port range. Only the tiniest hint of vanilla, toffee, and fig aromas are beginning to emerge. A nut-heavy dessert is the ideal accompaniment at this time. Due to the high sugar content in pecan pies, tawnies with greater age are a preferable choice. Because wood will sharpen some of their sweetness, the combination will not be as overpowering. Thanks to Shutterstock for the image.

Our Favorite Dessert Wine Picks & Pairings

There’s an ancient saying about wine consumers in this country: “We talk dry, but we drink sweet.” This refers to the fact that we secretly like wines that have a little sugar remaining in them after the fermentation process has been completed. Putting away the snide judgment lurking in there, my argument is that we don’t consume enough sugar in our beverages. Yes, we adore our red blends that are soft and sippable due to the small amount of sugar added to the mix. However, we avoid genuinely sweet wines, which means we are losing out on some of the world’s most beautiful dessert wines.

  1. In this case, I’m referring to late-harvest whites whose berries, in the Old World tradition, have been allowed to ripen on the vine until their sugar levels are high and their fruit tastes have changed into those of dried stone fruit and tropical fruit.
  2. The former is the world-famous sweet white of Bordeaux, while the latter (abbreviated “TBA”) is the sweetest of the German whites.
  3. Botrytis leaves behind rich honeyed aromas and a haunting minerality in the grapes as it dries and shrivels them, attributes that have contributed to the renown of both of these wines over the years.
  4. (There is no such thing as botrytis-on-demand; it is a naturally occurring occurrence that is unwanted when it occurs in the wrong grapes at the wrong time.

Other grape types, ranging from Chardonnay to Viognier, are being allowed to hang in the vineyards of Sauternes, in addition to the Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle of the region, and the Riesling of most TBAs.

Our Picks

Far Niente 2011 “Dolce” (Napa Valley; $85, 375 ml.) is a delicious dessert wine. With caramelized dried papaya and pear, and a sprinkling of orange zest, this dish is gloriously spicy. Chardonnay from Frank Family Lewis Vineyards (Carneros, Napa Valley; $100 for 375 mL): Honeyed pear and apricot nectar give way to exotic tropical fruit and spice in this fusion recipe. Hilly terrain in the Grgich Mountains “Violetta” (Napa Valley; $85, 375 mL) from the 2013 Late Harvest. In this wine, a mix of Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, and Gewürztraminer is sandwiched between earthy minerality and high-toned floral aromas, with rich yet lively orange and dried stone-fruit flavors sandwiched between them.

Merry Edwards is a writer and actress.

A 375-ml bottle of Robert Mondavi 2015 “Moscato d’Oro” (Napa Valley; $25) costs $25.

Stony Hill 2015 “Semillon de Soleil” (Napa Valley; $30 for 375 mL) Stony Hill 2015 “Semillon de Soleil” (Napa Valley) The mouth-filling flavors of apple, pear, mandarin, and sweet spice are well balanced by the refreshing salinity.

Perfect Pairings

In the Napa Valley, Far Niente 2011 “Dolce” (about $85, 375 ml.) is a delicious treat. With caramelized dried papaya and pear, and a sprinkling of orange zest, this dish is a delight. Winery: Frank Family Lewis Vineyards Late Harvest Chardonnay (Carneros, Napa -Valley; $100 for 375 mL) Honeyed pear and apricot nectar give way to exotic tropical fruit and spice in this fusion dish. Grich Mountains are located in the northwestern part of Bulgaria. “Violetta” (Napa Valley; $85, 375 ml.) from the 2013 Late Harvest harvest is available.

La Crema is a dessert that is made with cream and sugar, and it is served cold.

Happy New Year from Merry Edwards & Associates Sauvignon Blanc (Russian River-Valley; $48, 375 mL) from the late harvest of 2014.

2015 “Moscato d’Oro” (Napa Valley; $25 for 375 mL) by Robert Mondavi A hedonistic and exotically fragrant blend of citrus, peach, and dried mango that is both refreshing and energizing to drink.

The mouth-filling flavors of apple, pear, mandarin, and sweet spice are balanced by the refreshing salinity. 375 ml.) Honeysuckle, peach, and acidic citrus zest are complemented by savory crushed herbs and toasty spices in Whitehall Lane’s 2013 “Belmuscato” (Napa Valley).

  • The following desserts are included: Butternut Squash Spice Cake (pictured above)
  • Orange Ribbon Cheesecake
  • Maple Pecan Cake
  • Caramelized Pears with Toasted Hazelnuts (no need for the included chocolate sorbet)
  • Cholly’s World Famous Gingerbread Cake
  • Apricot Nut Tart
  • Spiced Apple Carrot Cake with Goat Cheese Frosting
  • Banana Pecan Dacquoise
  • Eggnog Cheesecake
  • Gingerbread Pear Trifle with

However, if you’ve reached your sweet limit, go for a cheese platter that includes blue cheese, brie, or something nutty like a P’tit Basque. The wine is similar to a sprinkle of honey on top of the dish.

Honey Poached Apricots

Apricots are stewed in a fragrant syrup prepared from white wine, vanilla, and honey, and then served with yogurt and a sprinkle of pistachios to finish the dish. What should you do if you buy fruit that isn’t quite ripe but you can’t wait to get your hands on it? I was eager and bought some apricots a few days ago that were still a little underripe. I should have known better. I’ll confess that the deep orange flesh flecked with crimson specks and the promise of delicious buttery flesh drew me in, but it was the deep orange flesh flecked with red specks that drew me in even more.

At the market, I noticed apricots and thought to myself, “the season is just getting started, hold out for the excellent ones,” but I quickly dismissed that notion and got a couple “just in case.” Upon maturity, an apricot is a thing of beauty, with a velvety velvet skin that is richly colored and gently scented, emitting the most intoxicating fragrance when ripened.

  • Although not as juicy as a peach, this fruit is just as appealing.
  • It’s a bit of a gamble, but if you’re in question, go with your instinct.
  • It’s possible that a few days of ripening on the counter might have made a difference, but I decided to poach them instead to bring out their delicious taste.
  • To bring out the most in these apricots and concentrate their taste, just a touch of heat was required.
  • I opted to stew my apricots in an aromatic syrup prepared from white wine, vanilla, and honey to bring out their musky floral flavor and to enhance their musky floral flavor.
  • If you serve them on top of a bowl of rich and extremely thick yogurt (like Greek yogurt, if you want) you will have a light and easy summer dessert or sweet treat to serve your family and friends.

Time required for preparation: 30 minutes Preparation time: 15 minutes Time allotted: 45 minutes In this simple dessert, the figs are cooked in white wine syrup before being served with yogurt and chopped pistachios.

Ingredients

  • 500ml fruity, flowery white wine
  • 1/2 vanilla bean, split lengthwise and seeds scraped
  • 6 tbsp/about 100g orange-blossom or wildflower honey
  • 500ml fruity, floral white wine
  • 500ml fruity, floral white wine 6 to 8 apricots, peeled and halved
  • Pistachios in their natural state
  • 14 cup / 28g raw chopped pistachios
  • Greek yogurt for serving

Instructions

  1. In a medium-sized saucepan, combine the wine, vanilla pod and seeds, and honey. Bring the mixture to a gentle boil over low heat until the honey dissolves
  2. Add the apricots in a single layer, carefully pressing them down so that the fruit is completely submerged
  3. Stir occasionally while cooking until the potatoes are just cooked but without falling apart, approximately 2-5 minutes total. (The length of time required is largely dependent on the freshness of the fruit, so keep an eye out for it) It is important not to overcook the fruit since you want the fruit to remain intact. Then, transferring the apricots to a serving dish with a slotted spoon
  4. Allow the remaining liquid to boil over medium-high heat until it has been reduced by half and has become mildly syrupy, then filter. Allow the apricots and syrup to cool before putting them in the refrigerator. Serve the cold apricots in a shallow dish with thick yogurt, sprinkled with pistachios, and drizzled with a spoonful of the leftover syrup on top.

Notes

Gluten-free, grain-free, and vegetarian options are available.

Nutrition Information:

1Serving Size (in grams): Calories:114 2 g of total fat 0 g of saturated fat 0 g of Trans Fat 1 gram of unsaturated fat Cholesterol:1mg Sodium:26mg Carbohydrates:11g Fiber:1g Sugar:8g Protein:4g The nutritional statistics for recipes provided on this website, such as calories, fat, carbohydrates, and other nutrients, are simply approximations and cannot be guaranteed to be accurate at the time of publication.

Gourmande in the Kitchen is the brainchild of Sylvie Shirazi, a recipe creator and professional food photographer.

She has been doing this for the last ten years, making eating more healthfully easy and accessible to everyone.

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