What To Pair With Dessert Wine Sauvignon Blanc

7 Tasty Pairings For Dessert and Wine

These dessert and wine pairings are perfect for every dining occasion, whether it’s a romantic dinner for two, an anniversary celebration, or a lavish feast for four. When it comes to combining food and wine, the key is to think of wine as an ingredient rather than as a complement. It provides a “additional bonus.” Wine intensifies flavors, resulting in a whole different flavor profile. Desserts are no exception to this rule. In fact, creating the ideal dessert and wine match may be a wonderful way to cap off a great evening with friends and family.

Strawberry Shortcake

This creamy classic is given a sparkly makeover with fireworks. Purchase the book and receive the course! Learn about wine with the Wine 101 Course ($29 value). With the purchase of Wine Folly: Magnum Edition, you will receive this bonus. Read on to find out more Vouvray Brut: This is a brute of a Vouvray. Made from Chenin Blanc grapes,Vouvrayis a crisp, mouth-puckering white wine that has flavors of green apple, pear, and honeysuckle in addition to its crisp, mouth-puckering texture. Those seeking for something familiar but also distinctive can choose sparkling wines from South Africa, where Chenin Blanc is a very prominent grape variety.

Furthermore, many Vouvray Brut wines are produced using the Traditional Method, which imparts a biscuity flavor that pairs beautifully with the already creamy components in this delight.

Peach Cobbler

The wine has a lot of fruit and a nice blast of acidity. The dry Riesling grape is Germany’s favorite wine, and it can be found in a variety of styles ranging from sweet to bone dry. It has excellent aromas of citrus and green apple to go with it. A slatey feeling of minerality is particularly noticeable in drier Rieslings, which only adds to the complexity of the wine. Why it works is as follows: Using its crisp acidity and fruity tastes, a dry Riesling cuts through the syrupy richness of a peach cobbler, increasing the fruitiness of the dish very slightly.

White Chocolate

Subtle sweetness should be balanced with decadently fruity aromas. New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc: Studies have revealed that New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc brings out more of the distinctive passion fruit flavors in wine than any other Sauvignon Blanc produced anywhere else in the world. When compared to its greener, Old World counterparts, the Kiwi standard forSauvignon Blanchas far more fruit to it, which contributes significantly to its current popularity. Why it works is as follows: Those rich, fruity fragrances take the subtle balance of white chocolate and enhance it with a layer of fruit that isn’t too overpowering in its own right.

After you’ve had a mouthful of white chocolate, drink a glass of Sauvignon Blanc. You’ll be convinced that you’re eating a fruit cream mousse at any moment.

Lemon Bars

Match the notes of the sweet and the tart to each other. Many modern drinkers find the creamy addition of oak to the bracing notes of apple, pear, and lemon peel to be extremely controversial, maybe because they have had one or two too many butter bombs to enjoy this style. But the reality is that there are a large number of excellent oakedChardonnays available across the world, and their adaptability is one of their greatest assets. Why it works is as follows: Combining the shortbread crust and sharpness of a lemon bar with an oaked Chardonnay is a genuinely complementing parallel that is hard to beat.

Carrot Cake

With a hint of tanginess on the side, this dish is a combination of spice and sweetness. Fino Sherry (Spanish for “fine sherry”): Because it is the driest of the Sherries, Fino Sherry does not have the heavy sweetness that many of its darker sisters are renowned for, and instead has lighter, more delicate notes of almonds, salt, and a hint of citrus to accompany its lighter, more subtle flavors. The more robust tastes of the Oloroso Sherrysoften may be enjoyed on its own as a dessert, whilst Fino’s more subtle flavors can be enjoyed with a variety of cuisines.

The acidic Jackfruit taste of many Fino Sherries also works well with the earthier flavor of the carrot cake itself, which makes for a delicious combination.

Chocolate Mousse

With a hint of tanginess on the side, the flavors of spice and sweetness merge. Fino Sherry (Spanish for “fine sherry”) is a kind of sherry made from grapes that have been fermented in oak barrels. Because it is the driest of the Sherries, Fino Sherry does not have the heavy sweetness that many of its darker sisters are renowned for, and instead has lighter, more delicate notes of almonds, salinity, and a hint of citrus to accompany its lighter, more subtle overtones of salinity and citrus. Fino’s modest tastes may be matched with a variety of dishes, whilst the heavierOloroso Sherrysoften can be served as a dessert on its own.

The acidic Jackfruit taste of many Fino Sherries also works well with the earthier flavor of the carrot cake itself, which makes for a delicious contrast.

Apple Pie

Take this traditional pie and smother it in a slew of additional fruits! Gewürztraminer: Gewürztraminer is a very fragrant white wine that is recognized for its scent of lychee, flowers, citrus, and spices. Despite the fact that it is widely recognized as being sweet, drier types are available, and they are sometimes just as aromatic. Why it works is as follows: As with warm apple piedoes, Gewürztraminer blends fruit and spice in the same way, making it one of the most apparent dessert and wine combinations on this list!

Some wines are wonderful desserts on their own, but this should not prevent you from searching for the right after-dinner snacks to pair with them! Please share your favorite dessert and wine combo with us.

Simple Dessert and Wine Pairings With Chart

Karen Frazier contributed to this report. Karen is a wine, drink, and cuisine aficionado who enjoys traveling. She has a California Wine Appellation Specialist credential from the San Francisco wine school, as well as a Bar Smarts mixology certificate, and she works as a bartender for charity events. Specialist in the Appellations of California Wine (CWAS) In order for LoveToKnow to be a participant in affiliate relationships, it is possible that a portion of purchases from links on this page will be paid to it.

Our editorial content is not influenced by these relationships in any way.

A solid combination brings out the flavors of both the wine and the dessert to their full potential.

Berry Wines

Raspberry, strawberry, and other berry wines are produced by a large number of wineries. These wines pair wonderfully with dark chocolate treats because they have a traditional taste profile. Chocolate and berries mix together like peanut butter and jelly, and the sweetness of the wine wonderfully balances the sharpness of the chocolate.

Ruby Port

When combined with dark chocolate, Ruby Port offers a deep, rich, dark fruit flavor that is unbeatable. As a matter of fact, it’s a fantastic traditional combination that’s definitely worth trying since it successfully balances the bitterness of dark chocolate with the sweetness of dark fruit.

Chocolate Wine

Although it may seem like a no-brainer, chocolate and chocolate go together like peanut butter and jelly. Creamy chocolate wines, such as Chocovine, have a mild, milk chocolate flavor with a warmth that is nearly like a fortified wine in taste and texture. These smooth, creamy wines pair well with dark chocolate because they temper the intensity of the chocolate’s flavor while yet providing similar flavor characteristics.

Shiraz

Big, rich, fruit-forward notes that taste like berries and jam are commonly found in this powerful, spicy red from Australia that is also dry and peppery. While the Shiraz is dry, the fruit notes of the dessert pair beautifully with the dark chocolate, and the tannins help to cut through the fattiness of the dish. The dryness of the wine also helps to balance the sweetness of the chocolate, while the flavors of the jam help to soften any bitterness.

Wines With Crème Brûlée and Vanilla-Flavored Desserts

With its rich, creamy vanilla custard and caramelized sugar topping, this dessert is the perfect way to cap off a dinner. Pairing it with a dessert wine enhances the flavor of the meal even further.

Sauternes or Barsac

Traditionally, crème brûlée is served with sweet white wine from the Bordeaux area, which is the most traditional wine combination. Both Sauternes and Barsac wines are produced from grapes that have been infected with botrytis cinera, which is found in Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle. The presence of this fungus adds layers of complexity to the wines, and the lateness of the harvest results in a high residual sugar level in the finished product.

A luscious, sweet wine with tropical aromas and a great, balanced acidity is produced as a consequence, which is well complemented by the vanilla custard.

Moscato (Muscat)

This white variety has a subtle sweetness to it that makes it enjoyable. Apricots and almonds are typical tastes found in Moscato wines, and they pair well with the rich vanilla custard in this dessert. In addition, pairing a Moscato with crème brûlée helps to balance out the richness of the custard since, while it has a modest sweetness, it is not overpoweringly sweet like other dessert wines.

Gewürztraminer

This German dry whitemay seem like an odd pairing with a thick crème brûlée at first glance, but when you consider the wine’s taste and balance, it makes perfect sense. Gewürztraminer is a dry, spicy wine with a pleasant acidity that pairs well with food. The acidity of the wine helps to cut through the fat of the custard, and the dryness of the wine serves to temper the sweetness of the dessert. In this dessert, the delicate vanilla notes of the crème brûlée are complemented by the spiciness of the Gewürztraminer.

Pairing Wine With Apple Pie and Apple or Pear Desserts

Apple pies are a delicious combination of sweetness and spice. The majority of the time, wines that match well with apple pie will also pair well with other apple desserts, such as apple brown Betty (also known as apple crisp) and baked apples.

German Riesling

Rieslingfrom Germany comes in varying degrees of dryness and sweetness. The three finest apple dessert combinations are Kabinett, Spätlese, and Auslese, which are listed in order of sweetness from least sweet to most sweet. Riesling has a strong level of acidity, which helps it to cut through the sweetness of the pie perfectly. It also has a gently spicy flavour that combines with pie ingredients. Finally, the taste profile of Riesling is generally dominated by apples, pears, and other tree fruits, and the flavor of apples is a good match for the flavor of the wine.

Auslese is the wine you pick if you want a lot of sweetness in your wine.

Prosecco

Prosecco is a mildly bubbly Italian wine that is comparable to Champagne in taste and appearance. Prosecco is available at a variety of sweetness levels. To counteract the richness of the pie, go for an off-dry Prosecco that is gently sweet but not overpowering in its sweetness. Apple pie is made with crisp and acidic Prosecco, which pairs perfectly with the acidity of the apples used in the pie.

Moscato d’Asti

Champagne and Prosecco are both Italian sparkling wines with a mild bubbly finish. Depending on how sweet you want your prosecco, there are several options. Choosing an off-dry Prosecco that is gently sweet but not overbearing will help to offset the sweetness of the pie. Prosecco is crisp and acidic, which is a good complement for the acidity of the apples in the tart.

Lemon Meringue Pie and Citrus Curd Wine Pairing

Because lemon sweets, such as lemon meringue pie, are naturally acidic, they can be paired with wines that are rather sweet in comparison.

Ice Wine

Because lemon sweets, such as lemon meringue pie, are naturally acidic, they can be paired with wines that are rather sweet in contrast.

Late Harvest Whites

Grapes picked late in the season are used to make late harvest white wines, which are delicious. As a result, the wines tend to have a low alcohol content but a high concentration of residual sugar. The sweetness of these wines ranges from mildly sweet to extremely sweet. Consider a late-harvest Viognier or Chardonnay, which tend to have zesty qualities that will pair nicely with the lemon taste profile.

Champagne

Grapes picked late in the season are used to make late harvest white wines. This results in relatively low alcohol content, but larger levels of residual sugar in the wines. Depending on the variety, these wines might be mildly sweet or extremely sweet. Consider a late-harvest Viognier or Chardonnay, which tend to have zesty notes that will pair nicely with the citrus.

Pumpkin Pie and Warm Spice Desserts Wine Pairing

Pumpkin pie and other pumpkin sweets tend to be sweet, creamy, and spicy, with a hint of cinnamon and clove. Numerous wines mix nicely with these characteristics, counterbalancing the creaminess and enhancing the spice notes.

Tawny Port

Tawny Port is distinguished by its golden hue and its warm, rich taste. Although the fortified wine is often sweet, it also has delicious caramel and spice tastes that go nicely with the pumpkin and spices. The strong alcohol content of the pumpkin custard helps to balance out the creaminess of the custard.

Australian Dessert Muscat

This is a fortified wine that is comparable to a tawny Port in taste and appearance. It boasts a delicious combination of sweet and spicy aromas, as well as a pleasing golden appearance. Wine drinkers frequently describe the tastes of this wine as toasty, raisiny, or toffee-like. Pumpkin pie benefits from the combination of these warm tastes and the warm spices.

See also:  What Is A Non Fortified Dessert Wine

Madeira

This fortified wine from Portugal is available in a variety of sweetness levels, ranging from dry to sweet. Choose a sweet or semi-sweet Madeira to combine with your pumpkin dish, depending on your preference. Among the many characteristics found in Madeirate are smoky, peppery, and nutty, all of which complement the flavor of pumpkin. The high alcohol concentration also serves to perfectly complement the rich, creamy custard.

Tokaji

Hungarian Tokaji has rainy notes that go well with the spiciness of pumpkin pie and other sweets with a similar flavor profile. Dessert wine has a pleasant sweetness to it that goes well with the spice in the pie.

Tiramisu and Mocha Dessert Wine Pairings

Many wines will pair well with tiramisu and other sweets with a coffee flavoring. Coffee is a taste that combines nicely with a variety of flavor characteristics, according to the experts.

Vin Santo

The color of this sweet Italian dessert wine has a lovely golden hue. It has a nutty flavor, similar to that of hazelnuts, with a hint of sweetness. Nuts and coffee go together like peanut butter and jelly, so a glass of Vin Santo will go a long way in balancing out the coffee flavor of the tiramisu.

Cream Sherry

Cream Sherry is a sweet fortified wine with a chocolate hue that is made from grapes.

In tiramisu, it has a nutty flavor with a hint of sweetness, which helps to balance out the harshness of the coffee components in the dessert.

Ruby Port

The color of this fortified wine is a rich maroon, and it has a subtle sweetness to it. Ruby Port is known for being fruit driven, with tastes of berries dominating the aromas and sensations. It also has slight notes of nutmeg in the background. The aromas of berries and nuts are a fantastic compliment to the flavors of coffee and espresso.

Berry Desserts

With a rich crimson hue and subtle sweetness, this fortified wine is a must-try! Typically, the tastes of berries predominate in Ruby Port, which is a fruit-forward style. Also present are undertones of nutmeg and almond. When it comes to coffee tastes, the flavors of berries and nuts are a fantastic match.

Rosé

Rosé wine is available in a variety of styles, from dry to sweet, and it has delicate floral and berry flavors that go well with berry sweets. If you’re serving sugary sweets, a drier rosé will help to balance out the sweetness.

Muscat-de-Beaumes-de-Venise

In the Rhône Valley, there is a sweet fortified wine called Muscat-de-Beaumes-de-Venise. It features sweet, honeyed, and citrus aromas that pair nicely with berries and berry desserts of all types and varieties.

Cava

The sparkling wine produced in Spain Cava may be either dry or sweet, and both are complementary to berries. Choose drier rosé wines to pair with sweeter sweets and sweeter rosé wines to pair with less sweet desserts to create a sense of balance and contrast in your meal.

Wine and Dessert Pairing Chart

The following chart outlines several excellent wines to pair with desserts, as well as a recommendation or two of specific wines for each type of dessert.

Matching Wine and Dessert

While the options above might serve as a starting point, there are no hard and fast rules when it comes to combining wines and sweets. Pair your favorite wines with your favorite treats. Look for tastes that complement one another and wines that will assist you in achieving the amount of sweetness you seek, and you’ll end up with a delectable match. LoveToKnow Media was founded in the year 2022. All intellectual property rights are retained.

12 Sauvignon Blanc Food Pairing Ideas to Make Tonight

Sauvignon Blanc is a crisp, robust, and refreshing white wine that is one of the most adaptable white wines available. Nevertheless, one of the key characteristics that make Sauvignon Blanc such a pleasure to drink (the huge array of flavors that can be found over the full spectrum of white wine sweetness) may also make choosing the appropriate Sauvignon Blanc food pairings a difficult task at times. Fear not, since Sauvignon Blanc wine is a fantastic match for a variety of cuisines, and we’ve compiled a list of some of our favorite pairings for you below.

You’ve come to the right spot.

In addition to that, we’re providing you with the simple, easy-to-follow recipes for these delectable dishes that will bring out the best in your zesty Sauvignon Blanc.

The many tastes of Sauvignon Blanc wine

Sauvignon Blanc is one of the most adaptable white wines available, and it is crisp, assertive, and invigorating. Nevertheless, one of the key characteristics that make Sauvignon Blanc such a pleasure to drink (the huge array of flavors that can be found over the full spectrum of white wine sweetness) may also make choosing the appropriate Sauvignon Blanc food pairings a challenging task at times. Not to worry, since Sauvignon Blanc wine is a fantastic match with a variety of cuisines, and we’ve compiled a list of some of our favorites for you below.

You’ve come to the right spot. From salad to seafood to peas to pavlovas, we have you covered. Even better, we’re offering the simple-to-follow recipes for these utterly delectable meals that will bring out the best in your zesty Sauvignon Blanc.

A general guide to Sauvignon Blanc food pairing

The food and wine combinations for Sauvignon Blanc are as diverse as the wine’s taste notes. However, this does not imply that combining this exquisite wine with a dish would be difficult. When drinking a wine with strong flavors, it’s a good idea to pair it with food that has strong flavors as well. The following foods mix well with Sauvignon Blanc: acidic vinaigrettes, briny sauces, spicy meals, and herbal cuisine, among others. When served with heavier meals, the sharpness of Sauv Blanc will lighten them and bring forth delicate nuances, while the pyrazines will pair beautifully with vegetarian fare.

However, we would not recommend this white wine for heavy, meaty dishes that include gravy or thick sauces, as it has a high alcohol content.

As you can see, the range of possible pairings is wide, and there are no hard and fast rules for pairing all Sauvignon Blanc wines together.

12 of the best Sauvignon Blanc food pairings

When it comes to matching your glass of Sauv Blanc with food, the possibilities are endless. Here are twelve of our favorites:

Cheese

Goat cheese is a popular food combination with Sauvignon Blanc, and it’s easy to see why. Furthermore, we propose Crottin de Chavignol, which is a specific type of cheese. A minerally French Sauv Blanc is a match made in cheese heaven with this softly acidic, creamy cheese with a little tang. Aside from Fontina and Brie, there are a variety of different cheeses that may be paired with Sauv Blanc. These include Swiss, Feta, Ggouda, and Gruyère, among others. Simply remember to choose one that has a tang, bite, or brine to counteract the citrus flavors in the wine you are drinking.

Spring vegetables

Because Sauvignon Blanc wine contains vegetal pyrazines, it matches remarkably well with vegetable-heavy recipes, particularly when spring vegetables are incorporated. If your dish calls for dill, zucchini, fennel, artichoke hearts, asparagus, or peas, this will be a fantastic partnering choice for you. Some herbaceous New Zealand Sauv Blancs, in particular, are very well-suited to these vegetables. You could also serve it with a simple spring veggie side dish, or even with goddess hummus! You may also use these spring vegetables into heartier recipes to allow the acidity of the wine to come through more clearly.

Shellfish

If you happen to have a zesty Sauvignon Blanc on hand, we highly recommend a heaping platter of seafood to pair with it! Sauvignon Blanc meal combinations include seafood such as oysters, clams, lobster, crab, prawns, and scallops, to name a few. They go very well with a glass of wine from the United States (California), Australia, Chile, or the French Bordeaux area. To be honest, our Halleck Vineyard Little Sister Sauvignon Blanc has been tried, tested, and approved as a fantastic wine to pair with raw oysters.

Finally, we must highlight one of our favorite Sauvignon Blanc cuisine pairings: garlic prawns with lemon and olive oil sauce.

This easy recipe mixes lemon, garlic, and shellfish to create a dish that is a match made in heaven with Sauv Blanc. The best part is that you may serve the dish with a dash of wine!

Fish

Almost any type of fish may find a home in a glass of Sauv Blanc. With a basic, lightly seasoned white fish such as cod, sea bass, snapper, sole, haddock, or halibut, a minerally Sauv Blanc such as one from the Loire Valley, France, or Tasmania is delicious. It also makes an excellent pairing with sushi. In the case of spicy or oily fish meals, a New Zealand Sauv Blanc or similar acidic cool-climate wine would be an excellent choice. When it comes to Sauvignon Blanc food pairings, mackerel, sardines, fish & chips, and smoked salmon are all good options.

Salad

Sauvignon Blanc food combinations that include fresh salads with tangy vinaigrette are yet another of the top Sauvignon Blanc food pairings. A dusting of crumbled goat cheese or feta on top makes it even more delicious. Sauvignon Blanc, on the other hand, may be enjoyed with a wide variety of salads, ranging from fruit salads to grain-based salads such as tabbouleh. It’s likely that your dish will be excellent with your bottle of Sauvignon Blanc if it’s stuffed with fresh herbs and greens, as well as avocado, mango, papaya, fresh tomato, and grilled red peppers, among other ingredients.

Wine pairings that are absolute *chef’s kiss* excellence.

Wines like an oaked Sauvignon Blanc will pair beautifully with creamy pasta dishes and mushrooms in any form.

Try this fast and simple pesto pasta recipe with chicken and fresh tomatoes for a sure-fire Sauvignon Blanc food combination that will leave you wanting more.

Thai food

If you’re looking to turn up the heat in the kitchen, Thai cuisine is an excellent combination for Sauvignon Blanc. If you’re making fiery south-east Asian meals with lime and chile, we recommend a herbaceous Sauv Blanc. Thai chicken salad and Thai green curry are two of our favorite dishes to prepare. If you’re anxious about locating Thai ingredients, we’ve created a really simpleThai green curry recipe for you to try out instead.

Greek food

Thai cuisine isn’t the only sort of cuisine that pairs well with Sauvignon Blanc, as you can see in the chart below. A citrus-heavy Sauvignon Blanc is enhanced by traditional Greek cuisine that include feta, citrus, artichoke hearts, and salty olives, among other ingredients. Cook a classic Greek salad or a delicious Greek chicken pasta dish with olives and feta cheese to go with your Sauvignon Blanc. We also strongly recommend this cucumber dill yogurt salad, which is perfect for a hot summer evening.

Mexican food

We’ve already noted that spicy food and Sauvignon Blanc are excellent meal pairings, but we can’t forget about Mexican cuisine! Although you may not think of wine when you think of Mexican food, the avocado, cilantro, cheese, and chilies found in guacamoles, salsas, and garnishes all pair very well with a dry white wine like Sauvignon Blanc. For your Mexican meal, we recommend a more fruit-forward Sauv Blanc that will smooth out the heat.

Try pairing your Sauvignon Blanc with handmade guacamole, ceviche, quesadillas, queso fundido, or this delectable freshfish taco dish prepared with cilantro, avocado, fresh tomato, cheese, and lime juice. Add extra Tabasco or maybe some Sriracha to the top and serve immediately. YUM!

White meats

With white meats such as chicken, turkey, or pork chops, an oaked Sauv Blanc is the ideal paring option. The fattiness of the meat will enhance the acidity of the wine, making it shine even more brightly. We propose this delicious rosemary chicken dish, as well as grilled or roasted chicken with white wine butter sauce, which will bring out the buttery flavor of an oaked Sauv Blanc to its full potential.

Fresh herbs

Despite the fact that we’ve already touched on herbs in a few earlier sections, they form such a harmonic marriage with flowery, grassy Sauv Blancs that we felt it was necessary to go into further depth about the finest partnering combinations. Look for recipes that use herbs such as mint, basil, cilantro, rosemary, parsley, thyme, fennel, dill, chives, or tarragon in the ingredients list. You may also use any of them to season a salad, vegetables, or light supper to transform practically any dish into the perfect Sauvignon Blanc food combination you’ve been seeking for!

Desserts

Finally, but certainly not least, we must include dessert. Normally, a dry wine like Sauvignon Blanc would not be a suitable match for dessert, but if your dessert is light, acidic, and/or tangy, it can make for an unexpectedly tasty combination with Sauvignon Blanc. Pair your white wine with desserts such as fruit tarts, macarons, or this delectable combination of apassionfruit and mango pavlova. Heaven.

It’s time to set the table with your Sauvignon Blanc food pairings!

With these delicious Sauvignon Blanc meal combination suggestions, you’ll be ready for supper in no time. A crisp salad, spicy Thai or Mexican meal, a smoky fish dish, or a sweet dessert will all pair wonderfully with a bottle of Sauvignon Blanc. A minerally Sauv Blanc from the Loire Valley or a tangy, fruity bottle from Marlborough are also excellent choices. Our very own 2019 Little Sister Sauvignon Blanc from Halleck Vineyard is a versatile hard-hitter that has both acidic and mineral characteristics.

See also:  How To Drink Dessert Wine

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Sauvignon Blanc food pairing guide (2021)

Sauvignon blanc meal pairing is a fascinating topic to discuss because it is a popular wine among many people. This crisp and herbaceous wine goes well with a broad variety of foods, snacks, and cheeses, and it’s easy to see why. This advice will assist you in selecting the most appropriate dish to go with your Sauvignon Blanc. Published on the 16th of July, 2020 In the wine industry, Sauvignon Blanc is one of the most widely planted grape varietals in the world. It is produced in practically every wine-producing country, and there are many various types to choose from, depending on the region.

In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to pair your bottle of Sauvignon Blanc with the greatest cuisine possible.

About Sauvignon Blanc Wine

Sauvignon Blanc, which literally translates as “Wild White” in French, is one of the most widely planted white grape varietals in the world. It is believed to have originated in the French province of Bordeaux, although it is now grown all over the world. Despite the fact that there are many various types and flavors, it is most often created in a crisp light-bodied style with a high acidity. According on the region in which it is cultivated, it can emit a variety of various fragrances, the most typical of which aregooseberry, grass, citrus, dried herbs, mineral, and passion fruit.

Chile, South Africa, Spain, Australia, and Italy are all producing excellent Sauvignon Blanc wines, as are a number of other countries.

Sauvignon blancs from New Zealand are more expressive, with notes of tropical fruit and citrus lingering on the palate. Try a Sauvignon blanc from South Africa if you want a Sauvignon blanc with the classic “green” aspect.

Sauvignon Blanc food pairing

Sauvignon blanc is a versatile wine that pairs nicely with a variety of dishes. When combining food with Sauvignon Blanc, it is important to examine both the features of the meal and the characteristics of the wine being served.

  • A fresh, lightcrisp character pairs well with foods that are also light and fresh, like as fish and shellfish. Due to the high acidity of the wine, it is possible to match it with fatty foods (made with butter, olive oil, or cream) as well as acid condiments such as lemon juice
  • And Combining it with “green” recipes that include herbs (parsley, rosmarin, oregano, thyme, etc.) and various types of vegetables is a good idea.

Sauvignon blanc should always be served at room temperature. The recommended serving temperature is between 7 and 10 degrees Celsius (45 and 48 degrees Fahrenheit).

Sauvignon Blanc with Cheese

The combination of Sauvignon Blanc with goat cheese is one of the most traditional wine and food combinations. This cheese is enhanced by the herbaceous character of the wine, which enhances the nutty and herbal flavors of the cheese. It is also an excellent option of wine to pair with a cheese plate that has a variety of cheeses. If you’d want to learn more about the numerous varieties of goat cheeses and the Sauvignon Blanc wines that match well with them, you can check out our full wine and cheese guide.

Sauvignon Blanc with FishSeafood

Due to Sauvignon Blanc’s crisp and delicate flavor, it is an ideal match for light fish meals and seafood preparations. The mineral and citrus flavors in a glass of Sauvignon Blanc, particularly a French Sancerre, will enhance the flavor of oysters, making it a delectable pairing. It goes particularly well with delicate fish dishes, such as salmon with herbs and lemon.

Sauvignon Blanc with Poultry

White meats such as chicken and turkey, as well as seafood, go nicely with Sauvignon Blanc. A glass of herbaceous Sauvignon Blanc will go particularly well with poultry flavored with dried or fresh herbs and lemon zest. When served with chicken meals that include tropical fruits such as pineapple, a Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand will be a fantastic pairing. When combined with sweet and savory flavors in the cuisine, tropical fruit flavors in the wine are a marriage made in heaven. Tips! Sauvignon Blanc is also a fantastic choice for Thai cuisine because of the scents of lemon grass and basil that it has.

Sauvignon Blanc with Vegetarian food

Vegetarian food and wine pairings can be challenging, but a bottle of Sauvignon Blanc is a reliable choice in many situations. With lighter foods like as a fresh salad or boiled vegetables, it pairs well. As a result, many fresh vegetables have a harsh flavor, making them difficult to combine with wine. Rucola, kale, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, asparagus, artichokes, and radish are examples of bitter vegetables. When paired with bitter meals, a crisp herbaceous white wine such as Sauvignon Blanc is a suitable choice.

We recommend reading our wine guide for vegetarian meals if you want to learn more about the best wines to pair with vegetarian foods.

Sauvignon Blanc with Pasta

Choosing a bottle of Sauvignon Blanc to match with vegetarian fare might be difficult, but it is usually a decent choice. With lighter foods such as a fresh salad or boiled vegetables, it works nicely. Many raw vegetables have a bitter taste, which makes them difficult to match with wine because of their harsh flavor. Rucola, kale, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, asparagus, artichokes, and radish are some of the bitter vegetables to eat. When paired with bitter dishes, a crisp herbaceous white wine such as Sauvignon Blanc is a great choice.

Vegetarian cuisine offers a wide range of flavors, cooking methods, and ingredients to satisfy even the most discerning palette. We recommend that you read our wine guide for vegetarian meals if you want to learn more about the finest wines for vegetarian recipes.

Sauvignon Blanc with Desserts

Whether you believe it or not, it is feasible to drink Sauvignon Blanc with various desserts if you select a fruity kind. The fruitiness of the wine works well with sour and acidic fruity sweets such as lemon pie or passion fruit pavlova, which are both made with passion fruit. Tips! For a more fruity style of Sauvignon Blanc, look to New Zealand, Australia, or California for your source of supply.

Sauvignon Blanc with Snacks

Sauvignon Blanc is a versatile wine that pairs well with a variety of appetizers, including potato chips, almonds, and salty crackers. This grassy wine goes particularly well with herbaceous nibbles such as marinated green olives or, in general, anything that has herbs and spices. It is also possible to drink the wine on its own as an aperitif. Take pleasure in your bottle of Sauvignon blanc with your meal!

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Due to the bitterness and high tannin content of chocolate, it may be unexpectedly difficult to match effectively with a variety of wine styles. Because both wine and chocolate contain antioxidants, it takes a delicate balancing act to get these two to function together in harmony. But, after you’ve done so, it’s simply divine!

Chocolate House Rules

  1. Dark chocolate and deep crimson, fortified wines go together like peanut butter and jelly. With lighter foods and white chocolate, white wines are a good match. It is possible to pair a sweeter dessert with a sweeter wine since the chocolate treat is sweeter.

Best Wines to Try

Dark chocolate goes well with deep crimson, fortified wines. With lighter and white chocolate, white wines are a great match. It is possible to pair a sweeter dessert with a sweeter wine if the chocolate treat is more sweet.

Whites— Sweet, long finish

Riesling from the late harvest, Eiswein / Icewine, and Tokaji

Classic Wine Pairings

a mousse made with vintage port and dark chocolate Dark chocolate is extremely rich and might have a harsh taste to it. The intense nature and punchy flavors of this dish necessitate the use of a powerful, long-lasting fortified wine. With deep black fruit flavors and a full-bodied mouthfeel, vintage port is a great accompaniment to a rich, decadent dark chocolate confection. a cake made with tawny port and chocolate Milk chocolate is significantly milder and less bitter than black chocolate.

It has less berry fruit aromas than Ruby or Vintage Port, and it is lighter in color.

Riesling from the late harvest with white chocolate Because white chocolate is the sweetest variety of chocolate, it should be paired with a sweeter wine that complements rather than overpowers the flavors of the chocolate in question.

The grapes, which are almost raisin-like in appearance, provide a dessert wine that is great with white chocolate truffles.

Our Favorite Dessert Wine Picks & Pairings

There’s an ancient saying about wine consumers in this country: “We talk dry, but we drink sweet.” This refers to the fact that we secretly like wines that have a little sugar remaining in them after the fermentation process has been completed. Putting away the snide judgment lurking in there, my argument is that we don’t consume enough sugar in our beverages. Yes, we adore our red blends that are soft and sippable due to the small amount of sugar added to the mix. However, we avoid genuinely sweet wines, which means we are losing out on some of the world’s most beautiful dessert wines.

  1. In this case, I’m referring to late-harvest whites whose berries, in the Old World tradition, have been allowed to ripen on the vine until their sugar levels are high and their fruit tastes have changed into those of dried stone fruit and tropical fruit.
  2. The former is the world-famous sweet white of Bordeaux, while the latter (abbreviated “TBA”) is the sweetest of the German whites.
  3. Botrytis leaves behind rich honeyed aromas and a haunting minerality in the grapes as it dries and shrivels them, attributes that have contributed to the renown of both of these wines over the years.
  4. (There is no such thing as botrytis-on-demand; it is a naturally occurring occurrence that is unwanted when it occurs in the wrong grapes at the wrong time.

Other grape types, ranging from Chardonnay to Viognier, are being allowed to hang in the vineyards of Sauternes, in addition to the Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle of the region, and the Riesling of most TBAs.

Our Picks

Far Niente 2011 “Dolce” (Napa Valley; $85, 375 ml.) is a delicious dessert wine. With caramelized dried papaya and pear, and a sprinkling of orange zest, this dish is gloriously spicy. Chardonnay from Frank Family Lewis Vineyards (Carneros, Napa Valley; $100 for 375 mL): Honeyed pear and apricot nectar give way to exotic tropical fruit and spice in this fusion recipe. Hilly terrain in the Grgich Mountains “Violetta” (Napa Valley; $85, 375 mL) from the 2013 Late Harvest. In this wine, a mix of Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, and Gewürztraminer is sandwiched between earthy minerality and high-toned floral aromas, with rich yet lively orange and dried stone-fruit flavors sandwiched between them.

Merry Edwards is a writer and actress.

A 375-ml bottle of Robert Mondavi 2015 “Moscato d’Oro” (Napa Valley; $25) costs $25.

Stony Hill 2015 “Semillon de Soleil” (Napa Valley; $30 for 375 mL) Stony Hill 2015 “Semillon de Soleil” (Napa Valley) The mouth-filling flavors of apple, pear, mandarin, and sweet spice are well balanced by the refreshing salinity.

Perfect Pairings

In the Napa Valley, Far Niente 2011 “Dolce” (about $85, 375 ml.) is a delicious treat. With caramelized dried papaya and pear, and a sprinkling of orange zest, this dish is a delight. Winery: Frank Family Lewis Vineyards Late Harvest Chardonnay (Carneros, Napa -Valley; $100 for 375 mL) Honeyed pear and apricot nectar give way to exotic tropical fruit and spice in this fusion dish. Grich Mountains are located in the northwestern part of Bulgaria. “Violetta” (Napa Valley; $85, 375 ml.) from the 2013 Late Harvest harvest is available.

La Crema is a dessert that is made with cream and sugar, and it is served cold.

Happy New Year from Merry Edwards & Associates Sauvignon Blanc (Russian River-Valley; $48, 375 mL) from the late harvest of 2014.

2015 “Moscato d’Oro” (Napa Valley; $25 for 375 mL) by Robert Mondavi A hedonistic and exotically fragrant blend of citrus, peach, and dried mango that is both refreshing and energizing to drink.

The mouth-filling flavors of apple, pear, mandarin, and sweet spice are balanced by the refreshing salinity. 375 ml.) Honeysuckle, peach, and acidic citrus zest are complemented by savory crushed herbs and toasty spices in Whitehall Lane’s 2013 “Belmuscato” (Napa Valley).

  • The following desserts are included: Butternut Squash Spice Cake (pictured above)
  • Orange Ribbon Cheesecake
  • Maple Pecan Cake
  • Caramelized Pears with Toasted Hazelnuts (no need for the included chocolate sorbet)
  • Cholly’s World Famous Gingerbread Cake
  • Apricot Nut Tart
  • Spiced Apple Carrot Cake with Goat Cheese Frosting
  • Banana Pecan Dacquoise
  • Eggnog Cheesecake
  • Gingerbread Pear Trifle with

However, if you’ve reached your sweet limit, go for a cheese platter that includes blue cheese, brie, or something nutty like a P’tit Basque. The wine is similar to a sprinkle of honey on top of the dish.

9 Dessert and Wine Combinations that May Surprise You

However, if you’ve reached your sweet limit, opt for a ­after-dinner cheese such as blue cheese, brie, or something nutty like a P’tit Basque instead of anything sweet. With the wine, it’s like drizzling honey on top of the dessert.

Dessert wines:Pairing Wine And Chocolate

Not surprisingly, chocolate and red wine may make an excellent pairing, but only when they’re served together in the proper proportions and proportions. The bitterness of chocolate, as well as its high tannin content and antioxidants, are the primary reasons behind this. Chocolate is one of the few exceptions to the common rule that dessert and wine should not be served together based on their sweetness levels. Dark chocolate and fortified deep red wines go well together, and white wines go well with milk and white chocolate.

See also:  How Old Is Too Old For Dessert Wine

Dessert wines:Wine For Sweet And Syrupy Desserts

Not surprisingly, chocolate and red wine may make an excellent pairing, but only when they’re served together in the proper proportions and with care. The bitterness of chocolate, as well as its high tannin content and antioxidants, are the primary reasons behind this phenomenon. In general, dessert and wine should not be served together according to sweetness level. Chocolate is one of the few exceptions to this general rule. Dark chocolate and fortified deep red wines go well together, whereas white wines go well with milk and white chocolate.

Dessert wines:Combining Wine And Nutty Desserts

The majority of nuts used in desserts have creamy textures and a faint bitterness to their tastes, which can be more or less noticeable depending on the variety of nut used in the dessert. Select a delicate white wine that has been aged in oak barrels to enhance the nuttiness of your dessert if the nuts are mild and modest in flavor. If the nuts have a strong flavor, consider a wine that is vibrant and powerful in flavor. Desserts that are nutty and sweet go nicely with sweeter wines. Sweet sherries with undertones of dried fruit and toast complement the tastes of most nuts.

Dessert wines:Pairing Fruit and Wine

When it comes to nuts, most are utilized in desserts because of their creamy textures and little bitterness in their tastes, which can be more or less noticeable depending on the type of nut. To complement the delicate tastes of the nuts in your dessert, choose for an excellent white wine that has been aged in wood to provide a nuttiness to the finish. A bright and powerful wine is recommended if the nuts have strong characteristics. nutty, sugary pastries are a good match for sweet wines. Almost all nut tastes are enhanced by sweet sherries that include dried fruit and toast overtones.

Dairy Dessert And Wine Pairings

Pay close attention to how well the flavors of your dairy dessert complement the flavors of the wine you’re serving. If the meal is smooth and creamy, a sweet wine with honey undertones would be appropriate. Select an oak-aged white with buttery flavors if your dish is heavy on the dairy and cream.

9 Delectable Dessert And Wine Pairings

Dessert and wine combos that will rock the foundations of your world (in a good way) are presented in this article. 1. Chocolate Cake with Tawny Port Wine Pairing—While milk chocolate is softer in flavor than dark chocolate, it still contributes a prominent flavor to chocolate cake. To complement your cake, choose a lighter fortified wine with flavors of caramel, coffee, or toffee. A tawny port is the ideal accompaniment. 2. Pairing Dark Chocolate Mousse with Vintage Portwine—Rich, bitter dark chocolate tastes require a robust, aged, fortified wine such as vintage port to complement them.

  1. White Chocolate and Late Harvest Rieslingwine pairing—A bowl of excellent quality Swiss white chocolate broken into shards or blocks is a super-simple treat that matches beautifully with a sweet dessert wine created from overripe vine-ripened grapes.
  2. 4.
  3. The smoothness of the caramel and the fizz of the wine compliment one another, the salt balances the wine’s acidity, and the flavors of the dessert and the bubbly enhance one another.
  4. In the pairing of a traditional lemon tart with Riesling Beerenauslese, you’ll discover just what you’re looking for.
  5. A sweet Bordeaux Sauternes with hints of apricot and honey is the ideal dessert wine to go with the world-renowned meal.
  6. Coffee and Walnut Cake and Pedro Ximénezwine pairing— A powerful fortified wine with a texture and tastes to match the bold flavors of coffee and walnut cake is required to complement these dishes.
  7. It’s also a fantastic ingredient for baking.
  8. Select a Sauvignon Blanc from the late harvest.
  9. Cheese Plate with Quince Paste and Cabernet Sauvignon Wine Pairing—Who says desserts have to be sweet all of the time?
  10. Opt for manchego cheese, which is made from Spanish sheep’s milk and may be served with a quince paste called membrillo and roasted hazelnuts, rather than the same old, same old cheeses.

When combined with Cabernet Sauvignon, the quince’s inherent tannins and subtle sweetness create a deliciously complex taste profile. The Highest Level of Indulgence

The right pairing ofa premium wineand a sweet or savory dish to finish a meal is one of the greatest joys in life. Create the ultimate indulgence by combining good wines withyour favorite desserts. With the tips and suggested combinations above, you’re sure to impress yourself as well as your friends and family.

Dessert and wine combinations that will shatter the foundations of your universe (in a good way) are presented in this collection. Milk chocolate may be softer than dark types, but it still contributes a prominent taste to chocolate cake. To complement your cake, serve it with a lighter fortified wine that has notes of caramel, coffee, or toffee, such as a tawny port. 2. Tanned port is an excellent choice. Second, a rich, bitter dark chocolate mousse should be paired with a robust aged fortified wine such as vintage port to bring out the most in the flavors of the dark chocolate.

  • A bowl of good quality Swiss white chocolate broken into shards or blocks is a quick and easy dessert that goes well with a sweet dessert wine made from overripe vine-ripened grapes, such as a late harvest riesling wine.
  • 4.
  • The smoothness of the caramel and the fizz of the wine are complementary to one another, the salt helps to balance the acidity of the wine, and the tastes of the dessert and the bubbly are complemented by one another as well.
  • 6.
  • 6.
  • It is the perfect dessert wine for this legendary meal, a sweet Bordeaux Sauternes with apricot and honey flavors.
  • A robust fortified wine with a texture and tastes to complement the intense flavors of coffee and walnut cake is required.
  • Cakes made with it are very delicious.
  • Select a Sauvignon Blanc from the end of the harvest.
  • Cheese plates are an excellent choice for those who want to conclude their dinner on a savory note.

When combined with Cabernet Sauvignon, the quince’s inherent tannins and subtle sweetness make for a delicious combination. An Unparalleled Level of Indulgence

CakesCookies

These 9 exquisite dessert and wine combinations will have you shaking the foundations of your universe (in a good way)! 1. Chocolate Cake with Tawny Port Wine Pairing—While milk chocolate is softer in flavor than dark chocolate, it still contributes a prominent flavor to chocolate cake. To complement your cake, serve it with a lighter fortified wine that has caramel, coffee, or toffee notes. Tawny port is the best option. 2. Pairing Dark Chocolate Mousse with Vintage Portwine—Rich, bitter dark chocolate tastes call for a robust, aged, fortified wine such as vintage port to complement them.

  • A bowl of good quality Swiss white chocolate broken into shards or blocks is a quick and easy dessert that goes well with a sweet dessert wine made from overripe vine-ripened grapes, such as a late harvest rieslingwine.
  • Salted caramel tarts (or salted caramel treats in any other form) and champagne or sparkling wine with naturally high acidity are a fantastic complement for a variety of reasons, including their sweetness and acidity.
  • Fifth, a Lemon Tart and Riesling Beerenauslese wine pairing: Lemon tastes have a tendency to overpower delicate wines, so you’ll want something sweet and acidic that can stand up to them while still creating something spectacular.
  • Crème Brûlée with Sauternes wine pairing: Crème Brûlée is an appealing dish that calls for a sweet, delicate wine that won’t dominate the delicate vanilla flavor of the custard.
  • 7.
  • A robust fortified wine with a texture and tastes that complement the intense flavors of coffee and walnut cake is required.
  • It’s also an excellent choice for baking.
  • Cheesecake with Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc wine pairing—Even though cheesecake is sweet, the cream cheese component gives it a savory aspect that is heightened by spice, fruit, and honey tastes.
  • 9.
  • A cheese platter is a great way to conclude a dinner on a savory note if you like to do so.

When combined with Cabernet Sauvignon, the quince’s inherent tannins and subtle sweetness make for a delicious pairing. The Ultimate Experiment in Indulgence

  • A light, possibly even effervescent beverage, such as a fine Prosecco wine, is recommended with sugar cookies or shortbread biscuits. Cookies with jam filling: A sweet, effervescent wine with a fruity taste, such as Moscato D’Asti
  • Wine to pair with ginger snaps or pumpkin spice: A rich, sweet wine such as Rutherglen Muscat
  • Pecan sandies, peanut butter cookies, or any other cookie containing nuts: Malmsey Madeira, for example, is a sweet, robust wine with nutty characteristics. Zinfandel, Cabernet Sauvignon, or Banyuls, which are inherently sweet, can be used to make chocolate cake or chocolate-chip cookies. Pavlova: A mildly sparkling wine, such as Moscato d’Asti, is used to make Pavlova. Wine for strawberry shortcake: A palate-cleansing wine such as extra-dry Prosecco
  • A red wine such as Maury or Banyuls is recommended for red velvet cake.

Confectionaries/Candies

If your favorite dessert is sweets or confectioneries, you’ll want a wine that will stand up to the test of time. When combining wine with this sort of delicacy, the most important guideline to remember is to always choose a wine that is sweeter than the candy itself. Here are some of my favorite food and wine combinations.

  • Ghiradelli’s dark chocolate chocolates and rich toffee bars, for example, are excellent choices. AnyMerlot, a California Cabernet Sauvignon
  • Classic chocolate/Hershey bars
  • AnyMerlot
  • AnyMerlot Caramel candy/candy apples (sometimes known as caramel apples): It’s best to drink a sweet, buttery wine like theTrinity Hill Gimblett Gravels Chardonnay from New Zealand. Candy kids/sour patch kids with bright colors that are sweet and sour: A flowery, fragrant wine such as a Pinot Grigio or Seghesio’s pinot
  • Peanut Butter Candy/Peanut Reese’s Butter Cups: A floral, aromatic wine such as a Pinot Grigio or Seghesio’s pinot
  • A drink with almond flavor and a hint of fruit, such as Emilio Lustau Solera Sherry

Frozen Desserts

Many individuals enjoy frozen sweets because they are convenient. Sweet frozen meals, ranging from ice cream to Baked Alaska, are a favorite among consumers. Some ideas for combining your favorite ice creams with other frozen treats are provided in this article.

  • Any of the late-harvest Zinfandels would go well with vanilla ice cream. Chocolate ice cream:Brachetto d’Acqui, a red wine with tastes of strawberries and raspberries, is a good pairing with chocolate ice cream. Sherbet/Sorbet: One of the most well-known wines on this list is the perfect complement with practically every sorbet or sherbet flavor out there (including Neapolitan). It is: Moscato d’Asti
  • Moscato d’Asti
  • Moscato d’Asti Fruity ice creams and BenJerry’s Strawberry Cheesecake are two of my favorite desserts. Zinfandels are excellent because they have a delicious, strawberry flavor and are medium-bodied. They are also inexpensive. It’s unlikely that a full-bodied wine will go well with these ice cream tastes
  • Wine and Nutty Ice Creams: Sherry is the ideal pairing for most of the nutty ice cream varieties available, and especially for any of the peanut butter ice cream tastes
  • Sherry and nutty ice creams are a classic pairing. Hot-Cold Pastry Desserts/Baked Alaska: Once again, a goodCrémant d’Alsace sparkling wine or a Tawny Port are excellent pairings for this dessert.

PastriesPuddings

Pastries and puddings are undoubtedly a popular treat for some individuals, notably in the United Kingdom, where there are over a hundred distinct varieties of pudding to choose from. Here are some wine and food combinations to get you started on your search for the right wine.

  • People in the United Kingdom, where there are around one hundred distinct varieties of pudding, consider pastries and puddings to be among their favorite desserts. Listed below are a few wine and food combos to assist you in selecting the ideal wine.

Custards, PiesTarts

Custards, pies, and tarts are the final group of sweets to discuss. Custards and tarts may be paired with a wide variety of wines, regardless of the filling used, while pie needs a bit more thought and consideration.

  • Cream custards and tarts: Both of these desserts are excellent companions to smooth, rich wines made from grapes such asRiesling, Vidal Blanc, or Vignoles that have been picked just after the first winter frost. Dark fruit sweets like cherry pie go nicely with red wines such as Zinfandel, Pinot Noir, and Syrah, among others. Apple Pie: Apple pie pairs well with one of our favorite wines, Moscato d’Asti, but you can also pair it with Sauternes or Tawny Port if you want. Pumpkin Pie: A medium-to-sweet Riesling or Muscat pairs well with pumpkin pie — if you’re not in the mood for wine, rum may be substituted for the wine. Pie made with rhubarb should be served with a fruity and somewhat sweet wine such as Spatlese or Auslese. Sweet Potato Pie: A high-acid wine such as a New ZealandSauvignon BlancorGewurztraminer
  • ‘Old Fashioned’ Pecan Pie: Bourbon

Vera Miller wrote this guest article specifically for Social Vignerons, and we are grateful to her for her contribution. a little about the author: Vera Miller is a passionate food enthusiast who enjoys everything about cooking, especially the use of current technology in the kitchen, which can make even the most inexperienced cook appear to be an accomplished chef. Her blog, Kitchen Gadgets Wars, is a place where she periodically expresses her thoughts on the latest and weirdest kitchen gadgets.

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