How To Make Croissant Buns

Homemade Laminated Dough: Croissant Buns

The Getty1 hairstyle is perfect for those who have piecey bangs and a lob or bob. Allow your bangs to hang loosely in the front and frame your face. Section your hair into three medium-sized portions in the back to begin. Make three medium-sized cornrows at the back of your head, halting at the crown of your head and braiding them in the direction of your ponytail. 3. Next, tie a ponytail around your hair. Using a rubber band or a hair tie, secure your braids into a ponytail once you’re through braiding them.

If you have excess flyaways, don’t be concerned.

5.Spray Sexy Hair SmoothSeal Anti-FrizzShine ($20) on your hair to give it a slight sheen and to finish off your appearance.

PREFERMENT

  • Milk, 1 1/2 teaspoons active dry or quick yeast, 2/3 cup all-purpose flour, 6 tablespoons sugar

DOUGH

  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons milk
  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 3 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon unsalted butter, melted and cooled
  • 22 teaspoons 2 3/4 sticks unsalted butter, cold but malleable
  • 22 teaspoons 2 3/4 sticks unsalted butter, melted and flexible

FILLING

  • Warm the milk in a saucepan over medium-low heat until it is just warm enough (80-90 degrees is ideal). Transfer to a medium-sized mixing bowl and toss in the yeast. Allow it settle for a minute before adding the flour and mixing until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise until doubled in volume, about 2-3 hours at room temperature or overnight in the fridge

MAKE THE DOUGH

  • Place the preferment in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook and mix on low speed until combined. Toss in the yeast and mix on medium speed for about 4 minutes, pausing occasionally to scrape down the sides and hook as required. Then, using a medium speed mixer, blend in half of the milk until it is completely integrated. Add the remaining milk, along with the flour, sugar, salt, and melted butter, and mix on low speed for approximately 3 minutes, or until it forms a shaggy dough. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside for 20 minutes. Reduce the mixer speed to low and continue to mix until the dough becomes smooth and elastic, about 3-4 minutes, but not for any longer than that. The dough will turn tough if it is overmixed, so be careful. Cover and let to rise for 1-2 hours, or until the volume has increased by half of its original volume. Place the dough on a broad work surface that has been dusted with flour. Form the dough into a rectangle that is approximately two inches thick. Wrap with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for 4-6 hours.

LAMINATE THE DOUGH

  • Place the butter in the bowl of a stand mixer and beat with the paddle attachment until smooth and slightly softened about an hour before you want to laminate the dough. To get the desired consistency, the butter should be malleable enough to spread yet still cold and reasonably solid. Using too soft butter can result in the butter oozing out of the dough. Transfer the butter to a piece of plastic wrap and shape it into a rectangle after it has reached the desired consistency. If the home is warm, cover and refrigerate
  • Otherwise, leave it at room temperature until ready. Taking the dough out of the refrigerator and transferring it to a lightly floured work area is important. Then, with the long side of the dough facing you, roll it into a 20″x10″ rectangle. Distribute the butter over the left two-thirds of the dough, leaving the right-third naked. You may use your fingers or an offset spatula to spread the butter. The butter should be spread uniformly and a 1/2 inch border around the borders should be left to allow for shrinkage. Fold the naked third (on the right) over the buttered center, then fold the remaining buttered side (on the left) over that, as if it were a letter, to seal the sandwich. Gently squeeze the seams together to completely enclose the butter in the bag. Using your fingers, roll out a new 20-by-10-inch rectangle with the long end facing you again, being careful not to release any of the butter throughout the process. Continue to fold the rectangle into thirds in the same manner as previously, then cover it loosely in plastic wrap and move it to a sheet pan, where it will chill for 1-2 hours. Return the dough to the work surface and sprinkle it with more flour if necessary. Carefully roll out into another 20″x10″ rectangle and fold into thirds one more time to finish the project. Wrap the dish in plastic wrap again and place it in the refrigerator for a further 1-2 hours or overnight to set. It is also possible to freeze the dough at this point for up to 3 months.

ASSEMBLE THE MORNING BUNS

  • In a small mixing bowl, combine the granulated sugar, brown sugar, orange zest, cinnamon, and salt
  • Set aside. Sprinkle granulated sugar on the interior of each of the 12 muffin cups after lightly brushing the insides with butter. Using your hands, swirl the pan around to cover all sides with sugar, then tap out any leftover sugar (reserve for finishing the buns). Prepare a sheet pan by lining it with parchment paper. The dough should be taken out of the refrigerator and transferred to a lightly floured work surface, where it should be rolled out to a 16 × 12 rectangle with the long side facing you. Brush the rectangle with the remaining melted butter all over, and then sprinkle the sugar mixture equally over the top of the rectangle
  • Starting with the long side of the dough facing you, gently shape it into a tight log, pinching the seams together to lock it in place. Transfer to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, cover with plastic wrap, and place in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to firm up
  • Remove the log from the refrigerator and cut it into 12 equal pieces with a sharp knife, as shown. Begin by cutting through the middle of each half, then cutting each half in half again, and then cutting each half into thirds
  • Make individual muffin cups out of each piece of dough
  • Wrap each one loosely in plastic wrap and set aside in a warm place for about 1 hour to proof. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit in the meantime. Place the muffin tray on a sheet pan lined with aluminum foil to collect any drippings before transferring it to the oven. Bake for 45 minutes to an hour, or until the top is a deep golden brown. As soon as they come out of the oven, generously sprinkle granulated sugar over the tops of the muffins. After about 2-3 minutes in the pan, gently take the buns from the pan and let them to cool upside down on a wire rack. Serve while they are still somewhat warm. The buns are best eaten the same day they are made, but any leftovers may be frozen for later use.

Brioche Buns

In a small mixing bowl, combine the granulated sugar, brown sugar, orange zest, cinnamon, and salt. Sprinkle granulated sugar on the insides of 12 muffin cups after lightly brushing them with butter. Swirl the pan around to cover all of the sides with sugar, then tap out any remaining sugar (reserve for finishing the buns). Using parchment paper, line a sheet pan. To make the dough, remove it from the refrigerator and place it on a lightly floured work area. Roll it out into an 18″ × 12″ rectangle with the long side facing you.

  1. Begin by rolling the dough into a tight log with the long side facing you, then pinching the seams together to seal them.
  2. Take the log out of the refrigerator and cut it into 12 equal pieces using a sharp knife.
  3. Placing each piece into a muffin cup, then covering loosely with plastic wrap and allowing to proof someplace warm until puffed up, approximately 1 hour; Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit in the meantime.
  4. 30 minutes to an hour, or until the top is deep golden brown.
  5. Wait approximately 2 to 3 minutes after removing them from the pan and placing them upside down on a wire rack to cool.
  6. However, leftover buns can be frozen for use at a later date if they are not consumed on the day of preparation.

Easy Brioche Buns

  • In a separate bowl, combine the granulated sugar, brown sugar, orange zest, cinnamon, and salt
  • Set aside. Lightly butter the insides of a 12-cup muffin tray, then sprinkle with granulated sugar. Swirl the pan around to cover all sides with sugar, then tap out any excess (reserve for finishing the buns). Prepare a sheet pan by lining it with parchment paper
  • Remove the dough from the refrigerator and spread it out into a 16″ × 12″ rectangle with the long side facing you on a lightly floured work surface. Brush the rectangle with the remaining melted butter all over, then sprinkle the sugar mixture over the top in an equal layer
  • Begin by rolling the dough into a tight log with the long side facing you, then pinching the seams together to seal. Transfer to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, cover with plastic wrap, and place in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to firm up. Remove the log from the refrigerator and cut it into 12 equal pieces using a sharp knife. Begin by cutting through the middle of each half, then cutting each half in half again, and then cutting each half in thirds
  • Place each slice into a muffin cup, cover loosely with plastic wrap, and let proof somewhere warm until puffed up, approximately 1 hour
  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees while you wait. Place the muffin tray on a sheet pan lined with aluminum foil to catch any drippings before placing it in the oven. Bake for 45 to an hour, or until the top is a rich golden brown. As soon as the muffins come out of the oven, generously sprinkle granulated sugar on top of them. After about 2-3 minutes in the pan, gently take the buns from the pan and allow them to cool upside down on a wire rack. Serve while still warm. The buns are best eaten the day they are made, but any leftovers can be frozen for later use.

Believe me when I say that when these brioche buns come out of the oven, you will be overjoyed with your accomplishment.

You’ll be clicking photos left and right, just like I did, trust me on this. So put your confidence in me, put your trust in the recipe, and let’s get to work!

Ingredient Notes

  • We simply require good old-fashioned all-purpose flour for this project. There’s no need for all that glitz and glam. Salt – Trust me when I say that salt makes all the difference, so don’t skimp on it! The flavor of our brioche buns will be enhanced with the addition of salt. Yeast — I used active dry yeast for this recipe. If you want to use instant yeast instead of active dry yeast, the only difference is that active dry yeast must be activated beforehand, whereas instant yeast does not require this step. Water – It is critical that your water be lukewarm before you start cooking. The water temperature should be between 95 and 105 degrees Fahrenheit for this to be effective. You don’t want to use anything that is too hot since it will destroy the yeast. Milk– Just as with water, we want to make sure the milk is lukewarm before using it in our recipe. Ideally, the temperature should range between 95 and 105 degrees. Sugar– When baking bread, sugar is essential since it is what gives the bread its soft and supple texture by absorbing part of the water and inhibiting the production of gluten strands during the baking process. Sugar is also necessary for the growth of yeast. Baking using unsalted butter is one of my favorite things to do. Because we already salt everything, it allows me to manage how much salt is applied to my bread. The butter in this recipe is added after the dough has been allowed to rise, and it is then used to spread the dough out evenly. It is this that will give our brioche buns their flaky texture. Eggs– Only the egg whites will be used in the dough, and the egg yolks will be used to brush the tops of the buns before baking

How To Make Brioche Buns

  1. Activate the yeast: In the bowl of your mixer, combine the warm water, 1 tablespoon of the sugar, and the active dry yeast. Mix until well combined. Stir it well and set it aside for 5 to 10 minutes until it becomes frothy. In a separate bowl, combine the remaining wet ingredients: Add the remaining sugar, milk, oil, salt, and egg whites and mix everything together until well combined. Make the dough by combining the following ingredients: Add 2 cups of the flour to the mixer bowl and mix on low speed for a couple of minutes until combined. In a cup-at-a-time increments, add additional flour until the dough comes together but is still a little sticky and mushy. My recipe called for 4 cups of flour, but you may find that you need a little more flour than I did. When probed with a finger, the dough should be somewhat sticky and elastic, and it should bounce back to its original shape. Scrape the dough from the bowl with an oiled plastic bench scraper and transfer it to a large mixing bowl that has been well greased. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and allow it to rise in a warm, draft-free setting for 1 to 2 hours, or until it has doubled in size.

Form the buns

  1. Prepare the oven and baking sheets as follows: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Prepare two baking sheets by lining them with parchment paper. The dough should be rolled out as follows: To release the air from the dough, punch it down. Using a couple of teaspoons of oil, coat your work surface well. Make a large rectangle out of the dough by spreading it out with your fingers to approximately 20 × 16 inches on the work area. The dough should be pliable enough that you can easily spread it out on a baking sheet. Alternately, you may use a rolling pin to do the job. Create flaky layers by doing the following: Spread approximately 3 tablespoons of the butter over the top of the dough. Make a three-fold fold with your fingers, and then spread the dough out a little further with your fingertips. Continue to fold the dough in thirds, as if it were a letter, by spreading additional 2 tbsp of butter over the new surface of the dough. Distribute the dough out a little further, and then spread the remaining butter over the top of the dough. For the final time, fold it in thirds. Spread the dough out to a size of approximately 12 inches by 8 inches. On the most basic level, we simply formed layers of dough with butter sandwiched between them, comparable to the process of producing croissants. Buns should be formed by cutting the dough into 8 long strips, each strip being approximately 1 1/2 inches wide. Using a pizza cutter, cut the dough into 8 long strips, each strip being about 1 1/2 inches wide. Fold each rope in half and twist it, then bring the ends together and squeeze them together to form a connection between the two ends of the rope. If your hands become stuck to the dough, simply coat them with a little oil. Place the buns on the baking sheet that has been prepared
  2. Only 6 buns will fit on a baking sheet, so the other 2 will have to be baked separately.
See also:  How To Reheat Steamed Buns

Finish and bake

  1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and the vanilla paste (if using). Generously brush the buns with this yolk mixture to coat them completely. If you want, you may sprinkle some poppy seeds or sesame seeds on top of the buns before baking them. Heat in the oven for 20-25 minutes, or until golden brown, after transferring the baking sheet to the oven. Allow them to cool for 5 minutes on the baking sheet before transferring them to a cooling rack to finish cooling

FAQsExpert Tips

What Is A Brioche BunBrioche buns are a rich, beautiful bun that may be made in a variety of forms. They are traditionally made in France. They’re a little sweeter than a typical bun, a little flakier, almost croissant-like in texture, but a little softer. What Is the Best Way to Serve Brioche Buns? On their own, these buns are delicious; however, they can also be used as sandwich buns, making them ideal for grilled cheese sandwiches. You can also spread jam, Nutella, or everyone’s favorite peanut butter and jelly on them.

Absolutely.

Are these Brioche Buns still possible to make if I don’t have a mixer?

You may still knead the dough by hand, though it will take a little longer.

Tips

  1. The yeast packet or jar must be refrigerated or frozen immediately after it is opened
  2. Otherwise, it will not work well. Ensure that your yeast has not expired by checking the expiration date on the package. It is recommended that you mark the “Best if Used by” date on all of your yeast products, whether they are in jars or packages. Dough flourishes in an atmosphere that is warm and free of drafts. If your oven has a “proof” setting, take use of it. The “proof” feature preheates the oven to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, creating a warm, but not scorching atmosphere in which your dough can rise properly. Even if your oven does not have a “proof” option, I would still recommend that you utilize it. The first thing I do is preheat the oven to 200F degrees (or whichever setting is the lowest for this particular model). Upon reaching that temperature, switch off the oven before placing the dough in it for rising. Consequently, the proofreading process will be significantly accelerated. The amount of flour you use in these buns is entirely dependent on your local climate and conditions. It might range from 4 to 6 cups, depending on the recipe. Due to the fact that I live in a very dry climate, I always have to use less flour than the recipe calls for. If you reside in a humid location, you will need to use extra flour. Remember that the dough is so soft that you don’t even need to roll it out with a rolling pin
  3. You can simply spread the dough out with your fingertips instead.

Storing Brioche Buns

It is true that brioche buns are best consumed on the day that they are made, but if you do have any leftover buns, they will keep for up to 3 days at room temperature. I normally just put them in a ziploc bag and call it a day.

Freezing

It is possible to freeze these brioche buns for up to 3 months, and they will keep in the freezer for that long. Just make sure they’re totally cooled down to room temperature before you use them. As soon as they have cooled, wrap them individually in plastic wrap and store them in a ziploc container to freeze.

More Great Recipes To Try

My NewsletterPinterest My NewsletterPinterest FacebookInstagram They are extremely flaky, buttery, aromatic, and melt in your mouth amazing! If you follow this simple recipe, you’ll be astonished by how simple it is to create them right at home!

  • Subscribe to My NewsletterPinterest FacebookInstagram TheseBrioche Bunsare unbelievably flaky, buttery, aromatic, and melt in your mouth delectable. You’ll be astonished at how simple it is to make them at home with this straightforward recipe.

Optional

  • Sugar
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla paste
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 1 tablespoon poppy seeds

Make Dough

  • Activate the yeast: In the bowl of your mixer, combine the warm water, 1 tablespoon of the sugar, and the active dry yeast. Mix until well combined. Stir it well and set it aside for 5 to 10 minutes until it becomes frothy. In a separate bowl, combine the remaining wet ingredients: Add the remaining sugar, milk, oil, salt, and egg whites and mix everything together until well combined. Make the dough by combining the following ingredients: Add 2 cups of the flour to the mixer bowl and mix on low speed for a couple of minutes until combined. In a cup-at-a-time increments, add additional flour until the dough comes together but is still a little sticky and mushy. My recipe called for 4 cups of flour, but you may find that you need a little more flour than I did. When probed with a finger, the dough should be somewhat sticky and elastic, and it should bounce back to its original shape. Scrape the dough from the bowl with an oiled plastic bench scraper and transfer it to a large mixing bowl that has been well greased. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and allow it to rise in a warm, draft-free setting for 1 to 2 hours, or until it has doubled in size.

Form The Buns

  • Prepare the oven and baking sheets as follows: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Prepare two baking sheets by lining them with parchment paper. The dough should be rolled out as follows: To release the air from the dough, punch it down. Using a couple of teaspoons of oil, coat your work surface well. Make a large rectangle out of the dough by spreading it out with your fingers to approximately 20 × 16 inches on the work area. The dough should be pliable enough that you can easily spread it out on a baking sheet. Alternately, you may use a rolling pin to do the job. Create flaky layers by doing the following: Spread approximately 3 tablespoons of the butter over the top of the dough. Make a three-fold fold with your fingers, and then spread the dough out a little further with your fingertips. Continue to fold the dough in thirds, as if it were a letter, by spreading additional 2 tbsp of butter over the new surface of the dough. Distribute the dough out a little further, and then spread the remaining butter over the top of the dough. For the final time, fold it in thirds. Spread the dough out to a size of approximately 12 inches by 8 inches. On the most basic level, we simply formed layers of dough with butter sandwiched between them, comparable to the process of producing croissants. Buns should be formed by cutting the dough into 8 long strips, each strip being approximately 1 1/2 inches wide. Using a pizza cutter, cut the dough into 8 long strips, each strip being about 1 1/2 inches wide. Fold each rope in half and twist it, then bring the ends together and squeeze them together to form a connection between the two ends of the rope. If your hands become stuck to the dough, simply coat them with a little oil. Place the buns on the baking sheet that has been prepared
  • Only 6 buns will fit on a baking sheet, so the other 2 will have to be baked separately.

Finish And Bake

  • Make sure your oven and baking sheets are ready before you begin. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit (gas mark 4). Put parchment paper on two baking sheets and set them aside for later. Using the dough, roll it out as follows. To expel the air from the dough, punch it down firmly. Two teaspoons of oil should be used to coat your work surface. Transfer the dough to a work surface and, using your fingers, spread the dough into a large rectangle about 20 x 16 inches in size. Make sure the dough is soft enough to be able to distribute it easily. Instead of a rolling pin, you may use something like this: Flaky layers should be created: Apply 3 tablespoons of the melted butter to the dough’s surface and press it in firmly. Fold the dough in thirds and stretch it out a little further with your fingertips. Once again, fold the dough in thirds, as if it were a letter, using the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter to spread on top of the new surface. Spread the dough out a little further and then dot the top with the remaining butter. One more time, fold it in thirds. Spread the dough out to a size of approximately 12 inches by 8 inches on a flat surface. As far as the actual baking goes, we just constructed layers of dough with butter between them, similar to the process of producing croissants
  • Buns should be formed by cutting the dough into 8 long strips, each strip being approximately 1 1/2 inches wide. Using a pizza cutter, cut the dough into eight long strips, each strip being about 1 1/2 inches wide. Fold each rope in half and twist it, then bring the ends together and squeeze them together to form a connection between the two ends of the cord. Using a small amount of oil will prevent your hands from sticking to the dough. Make sure to place the buns on a baking sheet that has been prepared
  • Because only 6 buns will fit on a baking sheet, you’ll have to bake the remaining 2 buns separately.
  1. Preparing the oven and baking sheets includes the following steps: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit (gas mark 5). Prepare 2 baking sheets by lining them with parchment paper. Using the dough, roll it out as follows: Punch down the dough to let the air to escape. Using a couple teaspoons of oil, coat your work surface well. Using your fingers, spread the dough out into a large rectangle approximately 20 × 16 inches on the work surface. The dough should be pliable enough that you can easily spread it out onto the baking sheet. Alternatively, a rolling pin can be used
  2. Create flaky layers by combining the following techniques: Distribute approximately 3 tablespoons of butter evenly over the surface of the dough. Fold the dough in thirds and stretch it out a little further with your fingertips. Once again, fold the dough in thirds, as if it were a letter, using the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter to do so. Spread the dough a little further, then dot the top with the remaining butter. One final time, fold it in thirds. Spread the dough out to a rectangle approximately 12 inches by 8 inches. Basically, we basically made layers of dough with butter between them, similar to how you would make croissants. Form the buns: Using a pizza cutter, cut the dough into 8 long strips, each strip approximately 1 1/2 inches wide. Place the strips together to form the buns. Fold each rope in half and twist it, then bring the ends together and squeeze them together to form a connection between the two ends. If your hands become stuck to the dough, simply coat them with a small amount of oil. Place the buns on the baking sheet that has been prepared
  3. Only 6 buns will fit on a baking sheet, so you’ll have to bake the remaining 2 buns separately.

Serving:1bun The calories in this recipe are 485kcal (24 percent ) 53 g of carbohydrate (18 percent ) 10 g of protein (20 percent ) 26 g of fat (40 percent ) 18 g of saturated fat (113 percent ) 1 gram of trans fat Cholesterol: 72 milligrams (24 percent ) Sodium: 326 milligrams (14 percent ) Potassium: 145 milligrams (4 percent ) 2 g of dietary fiber (8 percent ) 5 g of sugar (6 percent ) 379 International Units of Vitamin A (8 percent ) 1 milligram of vitamin C (1 percent ) Calcium: 82 milligrams (8 percent ) 3 milligrams of iron (17 percent ) Bread and a side dish are included in the course.

Cuisine:French Recipe for brioche buns, brioche buns in general

MeetJoanna Cismaru

My name is Joanna (Jo for short), and this is my blog, where I will be sharing my culinary adventures with you. You will discover a range of recipes that use simple, everyday items to create delightful, tasty, and comfortable dinners, as well as some luscious desserts, on this page.

Reader Interactions

Bring some excitement to your weekend morning routine with this creative spin on sausage, eggs, and toast. Written by Holly Lofthouse On May 11, 2021, an update was made.

Steps

  • This unique twist on sausage, eggs, and toast will make your weekend meal seem especially special. Submitted by Holly Lofthouse & Associates On May 11, 2021, the information was updated.

Tips from the Pillsbury Kitchens

  • Tip 1: Use turkey sausage for a leaner breakfast slider
  • Tip 2: Try adding Colby-Jack cheese to crank up the heat on your breakfast slider
  • Tip 3:

Nutrition Information

2021 ®/TM General Mills All Rights Reserved No nutritional information is available for this recipe.

Tartine Bakery’s Morning Buns

UPDATE: I’m currently working on an article on Tartine’scroissant dough, and as part of that process, I’ve made some changes to the recipe below. There are various more notes, make-ahead suggestions, and updated images in this edition. Please feel free to post any questions in the comments section. Morning buns are essentially kouign amanns on a much larger scale. Using an orange zest and cinnamon-spiked sugar combination, the bottom of the bun caramelizes to perfection, while the laminated dough turns crackly on the outside and delicate as a pillow on the inside.

  1. I make thecroissant dough from the original Tartine recipe, which I strongly suggest, as well as the guidebook that contains the recipe.
  2. All of the recipe notes are accurate, and all measurements (grams, cups, ounces, and so on) are included.
  3. The latter element is both a practical and beautiful addition.
  4. UsingTartine’sratios, I’ve created a flaky all-butter pie that has yet to disappoint me.
  5. Suggestions for Preparing a Recipe Size of a Morning Bun Despite the fact that the photographs in this post are of two separate bakes (with comments supplied beneath each image), they are all flaky pleasures regardless of their size.
  6. When I first tried this recipe, I was dealing with leftover croissant dough, which resulted in buns that were little but delicious nonetheless.
  7. Don’t be too worried with the size of your serving because it is more of an aesthetic consideration than a matter of taste.
See also:  How To Make Easy Hot Cross Buns

It takes 2 1/2 pounds of dough to make 12 decent-sized morning buns, according to the recipe below.

If you don’t want to make the entire 5 pounds of croissants, you can freeze the leftover dough for up to a week.

On the subject of size, the “Instructions” section of this post suggests that the dough cylinder be divided into twelve (1 1/2-inch) pieces.

Increase the size of the pieces to 2 1/2 to 2 3/4 inches in length and width, respectively.

Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tin Take notice of how the tail of the morning bun is on the outside of the morning bun on the right side of the above proofing shot.

Make an effort to turn all of the tails or ends inward so that the buns will hold each other together as they expand.

As a general rule, avoid proving the dough in a particularly warm environment since the butter layers will begin to melt.

The buns in the images were proofed for around 3 hours at 74°F. Take your time with this step since a properly proofed dough is your greatest defense against the butter leaking out of the dough during baking. Videos

  • Many times, I’ve re-watched this video of Chad Robertson baking morning buns in his home kitchen. It was this experience that helped me realize that the dough needed to be sliced into larger pieces in order to get the square appearance. Tartine Bakery just shared an IGTV video of their morning bun preparation procedure. It’s interesting to note that they don’t appear to be using brown sugar anymore.

It’s Time to Revisit Tartine The new cookbook, Tartine Revisited, has been released, and the morning bun recipe has been updated from the original one that was provided online. A handful of points to consider:

  • In the new edition, the amount of orange zest called for is 55 grams, or 1/4 cup. 55 grams of zest for 12 buns equates to around 1 teaspoon of zest each bun, which appears to be a significant amount. I just use 8-10 grams (total) of orange zest, as instructed in the recipe posted years ago, and the orange taste is sufficiently noticeable
  • The amount of cinnamon in Tartine Revisited has been lowered from 2 teaspoons to 1 tablespoon. Two teaspoons of the mixture provides a perfectly balanced flavor, so I intend to use that amount.

Polito Family Farms sells citrus at the Santa Monica Farmers Market. Farmers | Craftspeople I make an attempt to acquire my food from local craftsmen in California, with a particular emphasis on the Santa Monica Farmers Market, wherever possible. The following is a list of the individuals who made contributions to this dish.

  • Polito Family Farms is selling citrus at the Santa Monica Farmers Market this week. Artists & Craftspeople With a specific emphasis on the Santa Monica Farmers’ Market, I make an attempt to acquire my food from California craftspeople. The names of the people who contributed to this dish are listed below.
  • Temperature gauge (digital thermometer)- I possess three Thermapen digital thermometers, which I have divided among my three residences, the Airstream, and my mother-in-home. law’s They’re lightweight and easy to clean, and the probe makes an excellent cake and quickbread tester, as well. It is something I go for frequently, especially when creating croissant dough or working with yeast. If you are going to the trouble of producing laminated dough, I highly recommend that you use an OXO scale to weigh your ingredients. When baking, it’s often a good idea to use a scale to make sure everything comes out evenly. In my kitchen, I have two scales for different purposes. A model of OXO that I acquired more than ten years ago and just lately had to replace was the workhorse. Scale1 has passed away. Despite the fact that it gets frequently coated with flour, sauce, or whatever else happens to be flying around the kitchen, it is a dependable culinary friend. Pastry Brush- I use a small pastry brush for the pans and a big pastry brush for the dough while I’m making the cookies. One word of caution: although though they are dishwasher safe, I’ve noticed that the silicone absorbs flavors when washed in the dishwasher. The most effective method is to wash by hand. A fine zester and a fine mesh strainer (for sifting)
  • A muffin pan and a baking sheet
  • A cooling rack
  • Aluminum foil and parchment paper.

Temperature gauge (digital thermometer)- I have three Thermapen digital thermometers that I have divided between my home, the Airstream, and the home of my mother-in-law. Because they’re lightweight and easy to clean, they’re ideal for testing cakes and quickbreads. In particular, whether creating croissant dough or working with yeast, I grab for it frequently; If you are going to the trouble of producing laminated dough, I highly recommend using an OXO scale to weigh your ingredients. The use of a scale for baking is, in general, considered a good idea.

  1. A model of OXO that I acquired over ten years ago and have just lately had to replace is the workhorse.
  2. RIP.
  3. Brushes for the tins and dough are different sizes.
  4. Here’s a tip: even though these are dishwasher safe, I’ve discovered that when they are washed in the dishwasher, the silicone picks up flavors.
  • Tartinecroissant dough (about 2 1/2 pounds) Note: Reduce the amount of ingredients in the cookbook by half. half a cup (3 1/2 oz/100 grams) brown sugar (about) It should be noted that I have begun to use 50 grams muscovado sugar and 50 grams dark brown sugar in place of the previous 50 grams. Using just dark brown sugar is a sure-fire way to get results
  • 1/2 cup (3 1/2 oz/100 grams) granulated white sugar
  • 1/2 cup (3 1/2 oz/100 grams) brown sugar
  • The zest of 2-3 medium oranges (2 teaspoons or 8 grams), 2 tablespoons of cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon Diamond Kosher salt, and 4 ounces unsalted butter, heated and chilled are the ingredients for this recipe. Extra granulated white sugar to coat the muffin pans and sprinkle the final buns with.

The spherical buns at the bottom of the pan were created by baking this dough. Preparation Instructions

  • Combine the white sugar, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt in a medium-sized mixing bowl. Using a fork, thoroughly combine all of the ingredients to ensure that the brown sugar is completely lump-free. In a large mixing bowl, thoroughly incorporate the orange zest to disperse and release some of the oils. Remove from consideration
  • Melt the butter in a saucepan. To finish, brush the inside of the pans thoroughly with the melted butter before sprinkling one teaspoon of sugar over the sides and bottom of each tray, tipping and pressing it about to spread it evenly throughout. Turn the pan over and tap it to remove any excess
  • Because I don’t have a long ruler, I use painter’s tape to mark a 19×12 rectangle (from left to right along the counter). Maintaining the center of the dough and spreading it out evenly are made easier with this technique.

RollCut Note:Your butter should be room temperature or approximately. It’s preferable to not put hot butter on the dough.

  • The refrigerated dough should be taken out of its container and allowed to remain at room temperature for acclimatization. Trying to roll out dough that is too cold may result in it cracking as you try to roll it out. Roll the 2 1/2 pounds of croissant dough into a rectangle about 19×10 inches and approximately 3/8 inch thick. Make sure that the long side is in front of you. 2 ounces of melted butter should be brushed generously onto the rectangle. There should be enough butter to ensure that the sugar adheres – you may not need to use the entire stick
  • The sugar mixture should be uniformly distributed over the dough and should be 1/8-inch thick. Begin by rolling the dough into a tight cylinder from the long side of the bowl. Using a very sharp knife, cut the cylinder into pieces that are 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Note: For extra information on serving size, go to “Recipe Tips.” Set aside each piece in a muffin tray so that the sliced or swirl side is facing up
  • Proof for about 2 1/2-3 hours at 74-75°F. If the room is cooler, that is OK
  • But, if the room is too warm, the butter layers will begin to melt and become unusable. The size should be increased to approximately 1 1/2 times its original proportions. Please keep in mind that, as previously stated under “Recipe Tips,” correctly proving the dough is your greatest defense against leaking croissant dough. Preheat your oven at 400 degrees Fahrenheit with the rack in the middle position. Place the muffin tray on a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil to collect any drips before placing it in the oven. Reduce the heat to 375 degrees Fahrenheit right away. Start by setting two timers, one for 20 minutes and the other for 45 minutes. Baking for 45-55 minutes, or until deep golden brown, flipping the pan 180 degrees after 20 minutes, or until deep golden brown. Start by placing a sheet of aluminum foil on the counter, followed by a piece of parchment paper on top of that. Preparation: Prepare a wire cooling rack and set it away. As soon as the buns are done baking, gently take them from the muffin tin and arrange them on the wire cooling rack. Make sure to turn them on their side so that the caramel bottom does not adhere to the pan. Allow the buns to cool for a few of minutes before rolling them in sugar on a piece of parchment paper coated foil. Alternatively, you may just sprinkle the whole morning bun with sugar using a mesh strainer for a lighter coating. Note: Because this recipe contains a lot of sugar, I prefer a little coating of powdered sugar. Wait a few minutes for the morning buns to cool somewhat before eating them warm or at room temperature

Preparation | Preparation Ahead Morning buns are best consumed on the same day that they are prepared. Although we were outnumbered by our tummies, there were only two of us and a large mound of breakfast rolls in the morning to contend with. Listed below are a variety of alternative storage options.

  • Breakfast Buns (Counter): I placed two morning buns in a Ziploc bag overnight before baking them at 350°F till warm and crisped the next morning. The flavor and texture of the dish held up quite nicely
  • Baked Buns (Freezer) -Another alternative is to freeze the morning buns as soon as they have cooled fully to prevent them from going bad. Leaving them out on the counter to thaw will allow them to be reheated in the oven at 350 degrees until warm. This is quite effective
  • Dough for Croissants (Freezer) – The Tartinecroissant dough may be frozen for up to a week in advance. Alternatively, you may place it in the refrigerator overnight before you want to roll, prove, and bake it.

Golden Crescent Rolls

Oh Yay! My first experience with baking from home was with sourdough bread, and I was a little intimidated by the prospect of it. I was very astonished by how simple it actually was. Particularly tedious was the process of rolling out the dough. And it rose so nicely. I’m delighted with my accomplishment, and they taste fantastic! ADDITIONAL NOTE: After preparing these numerous times, I unintentionally discovered that allowing the rolls to sit for an additional hour before baking them actually improves the flavor of the rolls greatly.

Most helpful critical review

Oh, goodie! My first experience with baking from scratch was with sourdough bread, and I was apprehensive about this particular recipe. How very simple it was astounds me to this day. Making the dough, in particular, was difficult. And it rose in such a wonderful way. The fact that they are delicious makes me feel so accomplished. FURTHER NOTE: After preparing these a few times, I unexpectedly discovered that allowing the rolls to sit for an additional hour before baking them actually improves their taste and texture.

  • 5star ratings received: 285
  • 4star ratings received: 85
  • 3star values totaled 18, 2star values totaled 12, and 1star values totaled 4.

Oh, goodie! My first experience with baking from home was with sourdough bread, and I was a little intimidated by the prospect of it. I was very astonished by how simple it actually was. Particularly tedious was the process of rolling out the dough. And it rose in such a wonderful way. I’m delighted with my accomplishment, and they taste fantastic! ADDITIONAL NOTE: After preparing these numerous times, I unintentionally discovered that allowing the rolls to sit for an additional hour before baking them actually improves the flavor of the rolls greatly.

  1. I had to bake these at 325 degrees instead of 400 degrees since the 400 degrees that the recipe called for burnt the bottoms while leaving the tops undercooked.
  2. As a result of the health dangers linked with shortening, I replaced butter for the shortening in the recipe, and the results were still delicious.
  3. Compared to a croissant, these are denser, but not as dense as something like a yeast roll.
  4. Thank you for your contribution!
  5. We used whole wheat flour in place of half of the regular flour called for in the recipe.
  6. This dish is both tasty and simple to prepare.
  7. I was able to complete it with the assistance of my fellow foodies.

Because there are only two of us, I divided the recipe in half.

For dessert, I cooked Cinnamon Rolls, which were delicious.

I rolled it up and cut it, then placed it in a circular pan to rise.

I had some left over in the fridge, and it kept quite nicely.

Thank you very much!

Although not a croissant, this roll is significantly lighter than the usual roll.

See also:  Where Can I Buy Footlong Hot Dog Buns

The dough is highly recommended and performs well in a bread machine.

I will definitely be cooking these again and again since my four sons eat them up in no time.

My 5-year-old gave it a rating of “5 fingers plus one thumb on the other hand, for a total of 6 stars!”:) It was really simple to put together.

I sliced the rolls into wedges using a pizza cutter and then set them on baking pans coated with parchment paper.

I followed the advise of other reviews and reduced my oven temperature to 350 degrees.

I used melted butter to brush the tops of the cookies, as instructed, and they turned out very delicious.

They’re so beautiful and delicious, it’s astonishing.

I’ve already printed it out and placed it in a 3-ring binder for future reference.

My mother-in-law is an excellent cook, and she even complimented me on my dishes!

With this recipe, you can accomplish both goals!

  1. I dusted a small amount of egg white on top of each roll, which gave them a beautiful brow appearance.
  2. I’m going to bake them over and over again!
  3. I’ve tried three times and haven’t been too impressed.
  4. In any case, I’m going to keep looking.

Croissants

Advertisement

Ingredients

Advertisement

Directions

  • Advertisement

Nutrition Facts

Per serving: 196 calories; 3.1 grams of protein; 15.8 grams of carbs; 13.4 grams of fat; 45.9 milligrams of cholesterol; 303.5 milligrams of sodium Nutrition in its entirety

Fruit-Filled Morning Buns

  1. Grease the wells of a 12-cup muffin tray generously with butter. Fill each well with a teaspoon of granulated sugar, then tap the pan on the counter several times to coat the insides with the sugar mixture. Turn the pan over and lightly touch the bottom to remove any excess oil. To prepare the filling, follow these steps: Then, using a fork, thoroughly mix in the cinnamon and orange zest to ensure that it is evenly dispersed. In order to assemble: Roll the dough into a rectangle about 18″ x 8″
  2. Melted butter should be brushed onto the rectangle. Sprinkle the sugar mixture generously over the dough and softly press it into the butter with a rolling pin to ensure that it is evenly distributed. Make a tight cylinder out of the dough by rolling it up from the long edge. 1 1/2″ slices should be cut from the whole loaf. Placing the slices in the wells of the prepared pan and allowing them to rise for 1 1/2 to 2 hours in a place no warmer than 75°F will result in a fluffy bun (any warmer and the butter may begin to leak out). The size of the buns should be increased by one and a half to two times their original dimensions. Preheat the oven to 375°F toward the end of the rising period
  3. If preferred, just before baking, butter the back of a spoon and press it down into the middle of the buns. Set aside a cooling rack on top of a piece of parchment paper and bake for 40 to 45 minutes, or until the buns are deep golden brown. Place the pan on a baking sheet coated with parchment paper and bake for another 40 to 45 minutes, or until the buns are deep golden brown. Remove the buns from the oven and immediately (and carefully) lift them out of the pan and onto a rack to cool completely. If desired, roll the heated buns in granulated sugar and sprinkle the tops of the buns once more with sugar before serving. Allow to cool slightly before serving hot or at room temperature. Allow for up to two days of storage at room temperature with a light covering. for extended storage, place in the freezer

How To Make Croissant Dough

Even though croissant dough might seem scary, it is possible to produce this lovely pastry at home with time, a little bit of muscular power, and a lot of perseverance. This technique of making croissant dough is simpler, yet it still produces a flaky and buttery pastry. Recipe may be printed by clicking here. At long last, I’ve mustered up the guts to take on the croissant dough job that I’ve been putting off for a very long time. Croissants are one of my favorite pastries. Everything that is buttery and flaky is a personal favorite of mine.

  1. And, after all, why not?
  2. The chocolate croissants shown in the photo above were produced using the croissant dough recipe that I am sharing with you this morning.
  3. I’ve come face to face with a recipe for a large number of croissants.
  4. In the end, I decided on a single recipe to start with.
  5. I’ve seen some people use fresh yeast, which is interesting.
  6. Thisrecipe has an advantage over the others since it is simpler and more straightforward.
  7. When I saw that this recipe was authored by Nancy Silverton, another of my baking idols and the author of my favorite briocherecipe, I immediately jumped in and decided to give it a try.

Croissant Dough: The Process

Even though croissant dough might seem scary, it is possible to produce this gorgeous pastry at home with time, a little bit of muscular power, and a little bit of patience. This croissant dough is a simpler process that nonetheless results in a flaky and buttery pastry that is delicious. Quick Navigation Printing of Recipe This croissant dough project has been on my must-do list for a very long time, and I have finally summoned the confidence to tackle it. Crunchy, flaky croissants are one of my favorite breakfast treats.

  • Consequently, after witnessing the delectable pastries behind theMcCafebakery shelf at McDonald’s, I have now determined that I can’t possibly live another day without making croissants in my own kitchen.
  • There is absolutely no reason for me to put off the notion of preparing croissants because I enjoy baking and croissants are one of my favorite baked goods.
  • Their flaky and buttery texture is to die for!
  • After numerous hours of reading recipes one after another, gazing at them, and then blinking my eyes at the time-consuming and tedious procedure, I finally gave up.
  • croissant recipes that call for a starting have been published in the past.
  • A blend of flours has been used by certain people.

It is easier and more uncomplicated to prepare this dish than others. In terms of fit, it is ideal for me. As soon as I saw that this recipe was authored by Nancy Silverton, another one of my baking idols and the author of my favorite brioche recipe, I decided to dive right in and try it out.

Prepare the Butter Block

Prepare the butter while the dough is chilling in the refrigerator. Place the butter sticks on top of a clean, lint-free kitchen towel, side by side, so that they create a solid block of butter (do not use terry towels). If your butter is not already cut into sticks, just cut them into pieces that are almost the same thickness and place them in a nice block as illustrated above to make a block of butter. Now, using a rolling pin, pound the butter until it is pliable in consistency. We want it to be soft, but not too frigid.

Wrap the butter fully in the towels and store it in the refrigerator until required again.

Enclose the Butter Block Inside the Dough

After the dough has been chilled, unroll it and roll it into a rectangle of 16 x 10 inches. The butter block should be placed in the center of the dough. Aim for a parallel alignment between the long side of the butter and the short side of dough while cutting the dough. In business letter format, fold the dough as follows: Fold the bottom portion of the pastry all the way up to the middle to completely cover the butter. Stretching the dough as needed to keep the edges straight is recommended.

Fold the Dough to Get the Beautiful Layers

Following cooling the dough, unroll it and roll it into a 16 by 10-inch rectangle using parchment paper on the surface. The center of the dough should have the butter block on it. Aim for a parallel alignment of the long side of the butter and the short side of dough on the baking sheet. In business letter format, fold the dough in half. To completely cover the butter, fold the bottom portion of the pastry over to the middle. It may be essential to stretch the dough a little in order to maintain straight edges.

Repeat the Folding Three More Times

This rolling and folding process needs to be repeated three more times. When you reposition the dough after it has been chilled, make sure that the short side is facing you this time. Make a second dough rectangle 15 by 10 inches in size and fold it in half business letter style to finish the second batch of dough. The butter may peep out of the dough at any stage, and ripping may occur. To prevent this from happening, simply patch the tear with a tiny quantity of flour to cover it. After the fourth and final fold, place the dough in the refrigerator for at least 8 hours, but not more than 18 hours, before baking.

Here are some examples of what you may make with this croissant dough:

  • Chocolate Croissants
  • Cream Cheese Croissants
  • Tartine’s Morning Buns
  • Cinnamon Roll Croissant Cake
  • Chocolate Croissants

It is quite fulfilling to produce homemade and fresh pastries, therefore I hope that one of these days you will free up some of your time and make this excellent croissant dough, for which you will be highly rewarded with the delectable results! Enjoy!

Croissant Dough

A straightforward recipe for croissant dough that results in flaky and buttery pastry every time.

Preparation time: 2 hours 30 minutes Preparation time: 12 minutes The dough has to be chilled for 11 hours. Time allotted: 52 minutes Servings32croissantsCalories147kcal Authorsanna

  • 1.5 cups whole milk heated at 105°F–110°F
  • 1 teaspoon + 1/4 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup packaged light brown sugar
  • 3 3/4 to 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour, 1 teaspoon salt, and 3 sticks cold unsalted butter 1 1/2 quarts

Make dough:

  1. Warm the milk, brown sugar, and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer on low speed until well combined. Allow the mixture to sit for approximately 5 minutes, or until it becomes frothy and thick. Discard and start over if the mixture doesn’t froth. Add 3 3/4 cups flour and the salt to the mixing bowl and, using the doughhook attachment, mix on low for about 7 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and soft. Transfer the dough to a work surface and knead it by hand for about 2 minutes, or until it is smooth. Add flour, a little at a time, if required, to form a soft, somewhat sticky dough that holds together when pressed. When the dough is smooth and not too sticky, you have used up all of the ingredients. You will only need approximately 1-3 tablespoons of flour for this recipe. The remainder can be used for rolling and folding purposes. Pat and shape the dough into a roughly 1 1/2-inch-thick rectangle, wrap it in plastic wrap, and place it in the refrigerator for 1 hour

Prepare and shape butter:

  1. Place a clean, lint-free towel on a clean surface (a non-fibrous towel is best for this task.) Avoid using terry towels in this situation. Make a block out of the butter sticks by arranging them so that the edges of the block are touching. Roll out the butter with a rolling pin to soften it somewhat, but keep it cold so that it remains flexible. Place a second towel over the butter and set aside. Roll and pound the butter into a rectangle about 8 x 5 inches on the kitchen towel and set it aside. Wrap the butter fully in the towels and place it in the refrigerator until it is used

Enclose the Butter

  1. After the dough has been allowed to cool, remove it from the plastic wrap and place it on a clean, floured surface. Form the dough into a rectangle measuring 16 x 10 inches. If necessary, flour your work surface and rolling pin. Lift the dough frequently and stretch the corners to ensure that the dough maintains its rectangle form. Remove the butter from its wrapper by carefully peeling it away from the cloths and placing it in the center of the dough. Aim for a parallel alignment between the long side of the butter and the short side of dough while cutting the dough. After folding in the bottom portion of the dough over the butter, continue folding in the upper portion of the dough over it, completely enclosing and containing the butter within the dough. The business letter style fold is the name given to this fold.

Roll and Fold the Dough

  1. The dough should be unwrapped and transferred to a clean, floured surface after it has been cooled for at least 30 minutes. Rectangles of 16 by 10 inches should be formed from the dough. If necessary, flour the surface and rolling pin. The dough should be lifted and stretched often in order to keep its rectangle form. To assemble, carefully take the cloths off the butter and arrange it in the middle of the dough. Aim for a parallel alignment of the long side of the butter and the short side of dough on the baking sheet. In order to completely enclose and protect the butter inside the dough, fold in half the bottom part of the dough and then fold in half the top part of the dough over it. Business letter style fold refers to the way a document is folded in half.

Repeat the Rolling and Folding

  1. To make it three times, repeat the rolling and folding process: After chilling, unroll dough and roll it in the same manner as before, with the short side facing you. Fold the paper in the manner of a business letter and set it aside. After the last fold, place the dough in the refrigerator for at least 8 hours but no more than 18 hours. The dough is now ready to be rolled out and used in your recipe as specified.

The rise time for the constructed dough is included in the preparation timeframes. Recipe adapted fromEpicuriousNutrition Information Approximately how many croissants are served in a serving (1 servings) Calories147 Calories from fat account for 81 percent of the daily recommended intake. The following nutrients are included: *Fat9g14 percent Saturated Fat5g31 percent Cholesterol24mg8 percent Sodium224mg10 percent Potassium37mg carbohydrate (14 g5 percent) 1 % calorie Two-and-a-half percent sugar, two-and-a-half percent protein Calcium19mg2 percent Iron0.7mg4 percent Vitamin A285IU6 percent Vitamin C285IU6 percent * A 2000-calorie diet is used to calculate the percent Daily Values (%DV).

Made this recipe?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *