What Are Hot Cross Buns

Hot cross bun – Wikipedia

Hot cross bun

Homemade hot cross buns
Type Spiced bun
Place of origin United Kingdom
Region or state England
Main ingredients Flour,currantsorraisinswithspices

Aspiced sweet bun traditionally made with fruit and marked with a cross across the top, hot cross buns are traditionally eaten on Good Friday in historically Commonwealthcountries such as the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, India, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, and some other parts of the Americas, such as the United States. In the Christian tradition, a hot cross bun signifies the conclusion of the Lenten season, with different parts of the bun representing different aspects of the crucifixion of Jesus, the spices inside representing the spices used to embalm him at his burial, and the addition of [[orangepeel]], which represents the bitterness of his time on the Cross.

Hot cross buns might be available for purchase in Australia and New Zealand as early as New Year’s Day or even after Christmas.

History

Plain buns cooked without dairy ingredients (which are prohibited throughout Lent until Palm Sunday) are customarily consumed hot or toasted after midday on Good Friday in many historically Christian nations. It is possible that the Greeks used a cross to designate cakes in the 6th century AD. Some believe the hot cross bun originated inSt. Albans, at the English county ofHertfordshire. In 1361, Brother Thomas Rodcliffe, a 14th-century monk at St. Albans Abbey, invented a similar recipe known as a “Alban Bun” and gave it to the local needy during the Holy Week celebrations.

  • The penalty for breaking the edict was the confiscation and distribution of all of the prohibited goods to the destitute.
  • During the reign of James I of England (1603–1625), more attempts were made to limit the selling of these artifacts.
  • Along with one or two penny-priced hot cross buns “In 1733, Poor Robin’s Almanac published a poem by the same name.
  • According to food historian Ivan Day, “During the 18th century, the buns were manufactured in London.

Traditions

It was published in a Hawaiian newspaper in 1884 that an advertising for the selling of hot cross buns on Good Friday was placed. There are several superstitions associated with hot cross buns in English culture. The belief of one group is that buns cooked and eaten on Good Friday will not deteriorate or get mouldy the following year. An other advocate recommends storing such a bun for therapeutic purposes. It is believed that giving a slice of it to someone who is sick will aid in their recovery.

Hot cross buns are claimed to provide protection from shipwreck if they are carried on a sea cruise. According to legend, if they are hanging in the kitchen, they will guard the home from fires and ensure that all loaves are baked flawlessly. Year every year, the dangling bun is replaced.

Other versions

Major supermarkets in the United Kingdom sell a variety of variants on the classic recipe, including astoffee, orange-cranberry, salted caramel and chocolate, and apple-cinnamon, among other flavors. Some bakeries in Australia sell coffee-flavored buns, which are also known as coffee buns. There are also sticky date and caramel variations of the original bun, as well as smaller versions of the classic treat. Chocolate chip; chocolate and cherry; butterscotch; apple cinnamon; banana and caramel; and white chocolate and raspberry are some of the newest types that can be found in major shops.

The Not Cross Bun is one of them.

As of Easter 2012, Sydney’s Sonoma Baking Company says that it was the first company to commercially sell a Not Cross Bun, which in Sonoma’s case is piped with a ‘S’.

It is frequently marked with a cross at the top.

The cross

Hot cross buns with a cross carved out of the middle of them The conventional way for constructing the cross on top of the bun is to use shortcrust pastry, while some recipes from the twenty-first century suggested using a paste of flour and water instead of dough.

See also

  1. ‘Alexander and Deepa’ (10 April 2017). “Eatings for the season.” The Hindu is a newspaper published in India. retrieved on March 13th, 2021
  2. Ina Turner and Ina Taylor are two women who have made a name for themselves in the world of fashion (1999). Christianity. Page 50 of Nelson Thornes’s book, ISBN 9780748740871. Hot cross buns are eaten by Christians to commemorate the completion of the Lenten fast. These have a unique significance to them. The cross in the center depicts the manner in which Jesus died. The spices included therein remind Christians of the spices that were placed on the body of Jesus. It demonstrates that Christians no longer have to eat bland dishes by using sweet fruits in their bun
  3. Dennis R. Fakes is a writer who lives in the United States (1 January 1994). Investigating the Lutheran Rite of Worship. CSS Publishing. ISBN 9781556735967. Page 33. CSS Publishing. ISBN 9781556735967. Because individuals frequently abstained from meat consumption during Lent, bread became one of the essentials of the season. Bakers even started manufacturing dough pretzels, which were a knotted stretch of dough that mimicked a Christian praying, with arms crossed and hands put on opposing shoulders, in the early 1900s. During Lent, hot cross buns are quite popular. It goes without saying that the cross represents Christ’s cross
  4. AbRohrer and Finlo are examples of such symbols (1 April 2010). “How did hot cross buns become two for a penny?” asks the BBC. According to the BBC News. retrieved on April 26, 2014
  5. “Hot Cross Buns are already available for purchase.” au.tv.yahoo.com. The 4th of January, 2012. The original version of this article was published on October 16, 2014. retrieved on the 28th of December, 2013
  6. Kate Dodd is a woman who works in the fashion industry (3 January 2014). “Easter has arrived early this year: hot cross buns are already on the shelf.” The Toowoomba Chronicle is a newspaper published in Toowoomba, Queensland. retrieved on April 30, 2014
  7. “Can you tell me who was the first to cry “Hot Cross Buns?” The New York Times published an article on March 31, 1912. retrieved on May 4, 2010
  8. “The Original Hot Cross Bun Belongs to the City of St Albans,” according to the article. The Cathedral of St Albans. The original version of this article was published on March 16, 2018. 7th of December, 2016
  9. Retrieved 7th of December, 2016
  10. David and Elizabeth are two people that have a lot in common (1980). “Yeast Buns and Small Tea Cakes,” as the title suggests. Cooking with Yeast in the English Tradition. The Viking Press, New York, pp.473–474, ISBN 0670296538
  11. Charles Hindley was a British politician who was born in the town of Hindley in the town of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county of Hindley in the county (2011). “A History of the Cries of London: Ancient and Modern,” p. 218 in “A History of the Cries of London: Ancient and Modern.” Cambridge University Press (Cambridge, UK)
  12. Easter Celebrations Around the World: An Encyclopedia McFarland and Company, 2021, p. 130
  13. Ab”Hot Cross Buns.” Practically Edible: The World’s Largest Food Encyclopedia on the Internet. Practically Edible, in fact. On April 3, 2009, the original version of this article was archived. Obtainable on 9 March 2009
  14. “The greatest hot cross buns of the year 2019.” BBC Good Food is a television program that focuses on cooking and eating well. retrieved on 1st of July, 2019
  15. “Easter Baking: Hot Cross Buns” is a recipe for hot cross buns. jeanniebayb.livejournal.com. The 24th of March, 2008. The original version of this article was published on April 5, 2010. Obtainable on March 26, 2008
  16. “Delicious Hot Cross Buns,” according to Woolworths (Australia). 30th of April, 2014
  17. “Top baker’s recommendations to take your hot cross buns to the next level”
  18. “Hot cross buns: how to make them taste better”
  19. The website iloveindia.com has an article titled “Easter in the Czech Republic.” 7th of December, 2007
  20. Retrieved Mary Berry is credited with inventing the word “berry” in the 18th century (1996). (First edition (2nd reprint) ed. of Mary Berry’s Complete Cookbook. 386 pages, ISBN 1858335671, published by Dorling Kindersley in Godalming, Surrey. Delia Smith’s Cookery Course (First edition (8th reprint) ed.). Delia Smith’s Cookery Course (First edition (8th reprint) ed.). Delia Smith’s Cookery Course (First edition (8th reprint) ed. p. 62. ISBN 0563162619
  21. “The Great British Bake-Off: Paul Holywood’s Hot Cross Bun,” Easy Cook (magazine)(60), p. 38, April 2013
  22. “The Great British Bake-Off: Paul Holywood’s Hot Cross Bun,” Easy Cook (magazine)(60), p. 38,

Hot Cross Buns I

I just finished making these buns, and they are delicious. The raisins were mixed in with the other ingredients because we didn’t have any currants in the house. It didn’t appear to damage anything, but it may have made the buns a deeper color. If you prefer entire raisins, don’t do this. A quick tip for making the frosting: place your powdered sugar, milk, and vanilla in a heavy plastic sandwich bag and gently knead the bag until all of the ingredients are well combined. Once all of the ingredients are well combined, cut a tiny hole in one corner of the bag and squeeze to make the crosses.

Most helpful critical review

  • 5star ratings received: 179
  • 4star ratings received: 65 3star ratings: 13, 2star ratings: 6, and 1star ratings: 9.

I just finished making these buns, and they are delicious. The raisins were mixed in with the other ingredients because we didn’t have any currants in the house. It didn’t appear to damage anything, but it may have made the buns a deeper color. If you prefer entire raisins, don’t do this. A quick tip for making the frosting: place your powdered sugar, milk, and vanilla in a heavy plastic sandwich bag and gently knead the bag until all of the ingredients are well combined. Once all of the ingredients are well combined, cut a tiny hole in one corner of the bag and squeeze to make the crosses.

Wow these buns were very delicious!

I did make some modifications because my go-to recipe was a little different, and you might want to give this a try as well: Add 1 teaspoon each vanilla essence and butter flavoring, 1/2 teaspoon allspice, 1 teaspoon each dried lemon and orange peel, and 3/4 cup mixed candied fruit to make a delicious dessert.

  • Our visitors were blown away by these and demanded the recipe!
  • Instead of using warm water and powdered milk, I used 3/4 cup of warm skim milk in place of the other ingredients.
  • It’s really simple!
  • After that, when the buns come out of the oven, brush them with a swwt glaze (sugar, water, gelatin, and spice).
  • YUM!
  • To the original recipe, I added 2/3 cup of candied fruit and 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract.
  • Enjoy!

The place has a great scent about it!

I created two separate dishes for Easter, and I am confident that they will be a smash when they are served tomorrow!

Making the dough in the bread machine is one of my favorite things to do.

Continue readingAdvertisement This is an excellent recipe.

Also, I didn’t use a breadmaker (just kneaded the dough for 5-10 minutes).

As an alternative to icing, I used a sweetdough cross to decorate it, which I felt to be more similar to the store-bought crosses.

Using an empty milkbag with a small hole cut in one corner, I piped the crosses onto the buns the second time I prepared them, which worked much better this time.

I also used raisons and found them to be satisfactory.

Upon researching this Easter delicacy, I discovered that I could make it in my bread machine, which was a wonderful surprise.

I would also add the currants/raisins and cinnamon at the same time as the rest of the ingredients, rather than waiting until the last minute.

If you desire a stronger flavor, you may increase the amount of allspice, vanilla, butter extract, and other ingredients used, as suggested by a previous reviewer.

The buns came out large and golden, just as in the photo.

I’ve been making this recipe for years and have received several requests for the recipe.

This frees up space on the system so that a second or third batch may be started!

YUMMY!

How to create your own Hot Cross Buns at home. Warming spices, raisins, citrus, and vanilla flavor the soft and fluffy buns, which are topped with a classic cross for decoration. This Easter delicacy is really simple to prepare at home, and it tastes amazing, too! With a cup of tea or coffee, reheat the bread and spread it with butter before serving. It wouldn’t be Easter without a batch of hot cross buns baked from scratch. This recipe makes delightful fruit and spice muffins loaded with butter and vanilla, and they’re almost difficult to resist since they are so soft and sweet.

Follow my recipe to learn how to make them from scratch!

They’re piped with a classic cross to represent the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, and they’re brushed with a delightful apricot glaze to finish them off.

What you need to make this recipe

Using standard all-purpose flour is sufficient; there is no need to use special bread flour in this recipe. Additionally, flour is used to create the cross on top (more on that below). Sugar — For taste, I use a combination of white and brown sugar. Unsalted butter should be used because there is no need to soften it when it is being cooked. Milk — for the best results, use whole milk; lower-fat milk will work, but will not produce a dough with the same richness and taste as whole milk. Using an egg not only helps to create a rich dough, but it also helps to brush the buns with egg before baking them.

Warming spices such as cinnamon, allspice, and nutmeg are used to produce the characteristic hot cross bun aroma and flavor.

Before using them, soak them in a little orange juice for a few minutes to plump them up and make them more juicy.

Make certain you use actual vanilla extract rather than vanilla essence.

How to make Hot Cross Buns

1. Place the butter and milk in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave in 30-second bursts, stirring between each one. 2. Place the orange zest into a mixing dish and whisk it in. Set the bowl aside. 3: Soaking dried fruit is always preferable; you may do this with the juice of half an orange or 1/4 cup dark rum, for example. Microwave for approximately 45 seconds, then remove from microwave and put aside. 4. Place the flour, salt, sugars, yeast, and spices in the bowl of your stand mixer and beat until well combined.

  • Combine all of the ingredients in a stand mixer and blend until smooth.
  • Connect the dough hook to your stand mixer and slowly pour the wet ingredients into the dry mixture while mixing on low speed.
  • 6.
  • Once the dough has begun to come together, drain the raisins or dried fruit and sprinkle it into the dough while mixing on medium-low speed until combined.
  • Continue to mix until the dough is sticky but does not adhere to your fingertips when you lift your fingers.
  • On a lightly floured board, knead the bread for approximately 5 minutes.
  • 10.

11.

Make one side of the corners smooth and rounded by pinching them together.

12.

13.

Place the buns in a warm location for about an hour or more, covered with plastic wrap, aluminum foil, or a little moist cloth, until they puff up and become more inflated.

15.

You want to create a smooth, pipe-able paste, so adjust the amount of flour or water used to obtain the desired consistency.

Fill a piping bag with flour paste and snip off the tip, or use a smaller round tip to pipe the paste into the cookies.

Slowly roll the paste around the roll so that it embraces it. Bake until the top is golden brown, then brush with the apricot glaze to finish.

Pro tips for making this recipe

  • Make sure you measure your flour appropriately! Mistake number one: Using an excessive amount of flour in a baking recipe. Using a digital kitchen scale is the most accurate and convenient way to accurately measure flour. For those who don’t have a flour measuring cup, you may fluff your flour with a spoon and sprinkle it into your measuring cup, then level it with a knife. It’s critical to check that your yeast hasn’t expired, especially if you don’t bake often. If your yeast has expired, your hot cross buns will not rise properly. You may use either quick yeast or dry active yeast for this recipe. Before using, make sure to read the directions on the package because some require activation in a small amount of warm liquid first. If this is the case, a little amount of warm milk (approximately 1/4 cup) should be used to activate the yeast. Because the dough is highly enriched, I recommend preheating your oven to 100 degrees Fahrenheit and allowing it to rise in a warm, comfortable atmosphere for a while. Don’t be concerned if your dough doesn’t begin to rise right away
  • You’ll just have to wait a little longer because of all the tasty ingredients we’ve included in the dough. You have two options when it comes to the baking. Bake on a baking dish coated with parchment paper, spacing the rolls almost 2 inches apart. Alternatively, bake in a baking sheet and place them a little closer together. In the baking dish method, you’ll get slightly taller rolls that are stuck together, resulting in soft sides similar to a pull-apart roll
  • I used a more traditional flour paste for the cross, but you can skip that step and simply pipe a cross on top of the rolls after they’ve baked and cooled instead. To make the pipe-able glaze, just whisk together powdered sugar and any liquid (citrus juice, water, rum) until well combined. The buns can be covered lightly with aluminum foil if the tops of the buns are browning too much. Citrus zest is entirely optional
  • You can choose to use lemon or orange zest or leave it out completely. However, I recommend include it for additional taste. If you’re baking in a pan, make sure to leave enough space between the rolls so that they can expand
  • Don’t cram them together. You may use other dried fruits such as cranberries or candied fruit in place of the raisins or currants
  • You can also include nuts such as pecans or walnuts in place of the raisins or currants. Allow the buns to cool completely before cutting and serving them. When they are hot out of the oven, they will appear overly doughy on the inside
  • They will need to cool and dry out a little before serving.

Frequently Asked Questions

The cross on top of the buns signifies the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, while the warming spices reflect the embalming process that took place during his funeral service. For those who practice the Christian religion, this specific ritual of eating them after Lent on Good Friday is a significant one. The yeast represents his resurrection.

Where do they originate?

The cross on top of the buns signifies the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, while the warm spices reflect the embalming process that took place during his death. For those who practice the Christian religion, this specific habit of eating yeast rolls after Lent on Good Friday is a special tradition for them.

What is the cross made from?

The cross on top of the buns signifies the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, while the warming spices reflect the embalming process that took place during his death. The yeast represents his resurrection, and they are an unique custom for anybody who practices the Christian religion, and are eaten after Lent on Good Friday.

Can you make this without a stand mixer?

The cross on top of the buns commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, while the warming spices symbolise the embalming that took place during his death. When eaten after Lent on Good Friday, the yeast represents his resurrection, and they are a cherished custom for anybody who practices the Christian religion.

Can I prepare these in advance?

Yes, you should keep the dough refrigerated (covered with plastic wrap). To use it, roll it into balls and set them aside to rise a second time before using them. Due to the fact that the dough will be cold, it may take longer to rise. If you are not planning on baking the buns within a day or two, I recommend freezing them instead. Once the balls have been formed, they may be frozen until firm on a baking sheet before being stored in bags for up to 3 months. Before baking, place them on a baking sheet and allow them to rise slightly.

How long do they last, can they be frozen?

When stored at room temperature, the hot cross buns will last around 4-5 days. It is preferable to keep them covered in order to prevent them from drying out. Buns, whether raw or cooked, may be frozen (see instructions above for raw). Baked buns can be refrigerated for up to 3 months; however, they must be thoroughly thawed before being served or reheated. In the event that you make this classic Hot Cross Buns recipe, please remember to rate it and let me know how it turned out in the comments section below; I always appreciate hearing from you!

Hot Cross Buns

How to create Hot Cross Buns from scratch that are soft, sweet, and delicious. Do not forget to go through my step-by-step images and instructions up top for more information! Course BreakfastCuisineBritish Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time is 25 minutes. Time to rise: 2 hours Time allotted: 2 hours and 35 minutes Calories: 219kcal per serving (15 rolls).

For the Dough

  • 3 flour (440g) + more flour for dusting
  • 2/3 cup all-purpose flour a quarter cup granulated sugar (50g)
  • A quarter cup light brown sugar (50g)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 1/4 teaspoon instant yeast (one package)
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmegfreshly grated if possible
  • 1 tablespoon orange zestoptional
  • 1 egg large, room temperature, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup milk (240mL)
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract (15mL)
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter (85g)
  • 2/3 cup raisins or mixed

For the Egg Wash:

  • 3 tablespoons vanilla extract (45 mL)
  • 1 tablespoon apricot jam (15 mL)
  • 1 tablespoon water (15 mL)

For the Rolls:

  • Toss the raisins or other dried fruit in a bowl and pour half of the orange juice over them after zesting the orange and setting it aside. Toss everything together and heat in the microwave for about 45 seconds. Infusing them with flavor and plumping them up will be aided by the juice. If you like, you can substitute black rum for the white rum in this step. Drain the mil and butter and place them in a separate dish before using. Microwave until the mixture is warm to the touch (about 110F), then whisk in the vanilla extract and orange zest. Set aside the flour, salt, spices, sugars, and yeast in the bowl of your stand mixer once you have whisked them together to combine. Attach a dough hook to the mixer and slowly pour the wet mixture into the dry mixture while running the mixer on low speed. While the mixer is running, pour in the softly beaten egg and mix until the dough comes together. Sprinkle in the drained raisins and mix until the dough comes together. When the dough is sticky to the touch but does not adhere to your fingers, it is ready to knead. Remove dough from bowl and place it on a floured board, kneading for about 5 minutes, adding more flour if necessary. When the dough is springy to the touch and has a wonderful smooth texture, it is ready to be baked. Transfer to a large, lightly greased mixing bowl. Cover with a clean cloth and set aside in a warm location to rise. Because of the high concentration of nutrients in this dough, the yeast will take a little while to start going, but the dough will more than double in size. Divide the dough into approximately 14 equal pieces and place them on a lightly floured board. It is estimated that they weigh around 2.5oz or 70g if you are using a scale. Instructions on how to roll rolls:Pinch together the corners of your portioned dough and set it on a clean surface so that the stretched side is facing up. Circular motions with your hand around the dough
  • Cup your hand around the dough
  • Place the rolls on a parchment-lined baking sheet or in a large baking dish, leaving for a little less than two inches of space between the rolls to allow for expansion during baking. When baking them on a baking dish, you may bunch them closer together if you want them to be more of the pull-apart rolls with soft edges. Cover with plastic wrap, aluminum foil, or a clean wet towel and set aside in a warm location for one to two hours before allowing them to grow to nearly double their original size. During the time the rolls are rising, prepare the flour paste. 375F and brush the rolls with egg wash, which you produced by whisking together a tablespoon of cream and an egg
  • Bake for 15 minutes at this temperature.

To make the crosses

  • In a mixing basin, whisk together the flour and water until smooth. You’ll want a thicker pipe-able paste, so adjust the consistency by adding additional flour or water as required. To make crosses on the rolls, transfer the flour paste to a piping bag and cut the tip off
  • Then pipe crosses onto the rolls. Bake for about 25 minutes at 375 degrees Fahrenheit, or until the top is gently browned. If the rolls are starting to brown too much at the 20-minute mark, cover them lightly with aluminum foil and continue baking. Heat the apricot jam and strain it into a mixing basin, then whisk in the vanilla and water until well combined and smooth. Brush the glaze onto the heated rolls and serve immediately.
  • Make sure you measure your flour appropriately! Mistake number one: Using an excessive amount of flour in a baking recipe. Using a digital kitchen scale is the most accurate and convenient way to accurately measure flour. For those who don’t have a flour measuring cup, you may fluff your flour with a spoon and sprinkle it into your measuring cup, then level it with a knife. It’s critical to check that your yeast hasn’t expired, especially if you don’t bake often. If your yeast has expired, your hot cross buns will not rise properly. You may use either quick yeast or dry active yeast for this recipe. Before using, make sure to read the directions on the package because some require activation in a small amount of warm liquid first. If this is the case, a little amount of warm milk (approximately 1/4 cup) should be used to activate the yeast. Because the dough is highly enriched, I recommend preheating your oven to 100 degrees Fahrenheit and allowing it to rise in a warm, comfortable atmosphere for a while. Don’t be concerned if your dough doesn’t begin to rise right away
  • You’ll just have to wait a little longer because of all the tasty ingredients we’ve included in the dough. You have two options when it comes to the baking. Bake on a baking dish coated with parchment paper, spacing the rolls almost 2 inches apart. Alternatively, bake in a baking sheet and place them a little closer together. In the baking dish method, you’ll get slightly taller rolls that are stuck together, resulting in soft sides similar to a pull-apart roll
  • I used a more traditional flour paste for the cross, but you can skip that step and simply pipe a cross on top of the rolls after they’ve baked and cooled instead. To make the pipe-able glaze, just whisk together powdered sugar and any liquid (citrus juice, water, rum) until well combined. The buns can be covered lightly with aluminum foil if the tops of the buns are browning too much. Citrus zest is entirely optional
  • You can choose to use lemon or orange zest or leave it out completely. However, I recommend include it for additional taste. If you’re baking in a pan, make sure to leave enough space between the rolls so that they can expand
  • Don’t cram them together. You may use other dried fruits such as cranberries or candied fruit in place of the raisins or currants
  • You can also include nuts such as pecans or walnuts in place of the raisins or currants. Store the hot cross buns in an airtight container at room temperature for 3-5 days, or freeze them for longer storage. You may also freeze formed buns that have not been cooked.

One serving contains 219 calories, 30 grams of carbohydrates, 6 grams of protein, 8 grams of fat, 4 grams of saturated fat, 40 milligrams of cholesterol, 180 milligrams of sodium, 144 milligrams of potassium, 2 grams of fiber, 9 grams of sugar, 247 international units of vitamin A, 1 milligram of vitamin C, 33 milligrams of calcium, and 2 milligrams of iron. * Notice Regarding Nutrition

Hot Cross Buns

Have you ever tried your hand at making hot cross buns? These yeast rolls, which are soft and somewhat sweet with spices and currants and sometimes candied citron, are a beloved Easter ritual. Good Friday, the Friday before Easter Sunday, is traditionally the day on which the buns are served. The buns are marked with a cross on top (thus the name), which represents a crucifix.

Video: How to Make Hot Cross Buns

You’ve probably heard of them, but have you ever tried making them? These yeast rolls, which are fluffy and somewhat sweet with flecks of currants and candied citron, are a beloved Easter tradition in the United States and Canada. Good Friday, the Friday before Easter Sunday, is traditionally the day on which the buns are served. The buns are marked with a cross on top (thus the name), which symbolizes a crucifix.

The Trick to the Best Hot Cross Buns?

Instead, the secret was to limit the quantity of sugar and fat in the dough. My experience has been that adding sugar or fat to baked goods makes them more moist; yet, when it comes to yeast doughs, both sugar and fat can have the reverse effect, resulting in bread that is rough. So long as you keep the sugar and fat to a minimum, as we have done in this recipe, the buns will be delicate and delicious.

What Do Hot Cross Buns Taste Like?

To achieve this, the idea was to limit the quantity of sugar and fat in the dough. My experience has been that adding sugar or fat to baked goods makes them more moist; yet, when it comes to yeast doughs, both sugar and fat can have the reverse effect, resulting in bread that is difficult to slice. The buns turn out soft and delicious when you restrict the amount of sugar and fat you use (like we do in this recipe).

Making the Cross on Top of Hot Cross Buns

There are three different ways to form the cross on the top of the buns:

  1. After the buns have been baked, pipe frosting onto them. You may use royal icing or a mixture of powdered sugar and milk to decorate your cake. Making a paste of flour and water, or preparing a short pastry dough with flour and butter, and piping it on the tops of the buns before baking them are options. Before putting the buns in the oven, carve a cross into the tops of them with a sharp knife, making it pretty deep. Despite baking a little flatter, the buns will retain the cross-like shape after they are finished baking. There is no need for frosting or piping.

In this recipe, we will pipe crosses on the buns after they have been baked, using an icing made from powdered sugar and milk.

Make-Ahead Hot Cross Buns

The best way to enjoy these hot cross buns is to eat them right out of the oven. However, you may prepare the buns ahead of time and let them rise in the refrigerator overnight before baking them the next day, if you like. Alternatively, you can prepare the dough through the first rise, refrigerate the dough overnight, and then form and bake the buns the following morning. These buns keep nicely in the freezer. Allow the buns to cool fully after baking them, but do not pipe the cross on top of them until they are absolutely cool.

Allow to thaw on the counter overnight.

Allow it cool completely before piping the crosses on top before serving.

Looking for More Easter Treats?

  • Carrot Cake, Hummingbird Cake, Parker House Rolls, Lemon Meringue Pie, and Coconut Macaroons are some of the desserts available.

For those of you who are short on time and are unable to get the eggs to room temperature, simply place them in a bowl of warm water for a few minutes to remove any cold before using.

To make this recipe, you can use any combination of ground spices (such as ground cinnamon and mace), but make sure that the total amount of ground spices used is at least 2 teaspoons.

  • A (1/4-ounce) box of active dry yeast (about 2 1/4 teaspoons)
  • 3/4 cup warm milk
  • 1/4 cup + 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 3 tablespoons butter 1/4 to 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup currants (can substitute half of the currants with chopped candied citrus peel)
  • 2 teaspoons grated orange zest
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

To make the glaze, use the following ingredients: In order to make the icing

  1. Proof the yeast before using it. 1/4 cup of the warmed milk and one teaspoon of sugar are combined in a mixing dish to form a paste. Sprinkle the yeast over the milk and allow it to sit for 5-10 minutes, or until it begins to bubble. Elise Bauer prepares the dry ingredients by whisking them together. 3 cups of the flour (reserving the remaining flour for a subsequent stage) the salt, spices, and 1/4 cup of sugar are briskly whisked together in a large mixing basin or the mixing bowl of an electric mixer. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer is in charge of the dough. Make a well in the flour and pour in the frothy yeast, softened butter, eggs, and the remaining milk. Stir until everything is thoroughly combined. Mix the ingredients together with a wooden spoon or the paddle attachment of your mixer until they are thoroughly combined. The texture of the mixture should be shaggy and sticky. Combine the currants, candied peel, and orange zest in a large mixing bowl. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer: Knead the dough, adding extra flour if necessary, until smooth and elastic. Switch to the dough hook attachment on a stand mixer and begin kneading on low speed if you are using a stand mixer. (If you don’t have a mixer, you may knead the dough by hand.) Sprinkle in extra flour, a tablespoon at a time, kneading after each addition, until the flour is still somewhat sticky but is no longer entirely adhering to your fingers when you work with it, about 10 minutes total. Overall, the kneading time should be around 7 minutes in a mixer or 10 minutes by hand. Allow for a two-hour resting period for the size to double (first rise) Using the bowl, form a ball of dough and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap. Allow the dough to rise for 2 hours at room temperature (or in a warm area) until it has more than doubled in size, covered. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer is in charge of shaping the buns. Softly press down on the dough to allow it to be gently compressed. Roll the dough ball into a log form and cut it into two half using a sharp knife. Place one half of the dough back in the bowl while you work on the other half of the dough. Take the half of the dough that you are currently working with and divide it into eight equal pieces. Take the separate pieces and flatten them into mounds on a prepared baking sheet, spacing them 1 1/2 inches away from one another. Cover with plastic wrap and then divide the remaining dough into 8 equal pieces and arrange them in mounds on a baking sheet, covering with plastic wrap once more. Repeat with the remaining dough. Elise Bauer
  2. Set aside for 30-40 minutes (second rise) Continue to let the dough mounds to rise at room temperature (or in a warm area) until they have doubled in size, about 30-40 minutes more. Bake at 400°F for 15 minutes, brushing with egg wash. Elise Bauer Prepare egg wash by whisking together one egg and one tablespoon of milk in a small mixing bowl until smooth. The tops of the buns can be scored with a knife to create a cross design if you so want. When cutting the design, you’ll want to make pretty deep cuts so that the pattern is visible when they’re finished. Brush the egg wash over the dough mounds with a pasty brush to seal in the moisture. When they are cooked, the egg wash will give them a gleaming aspect. Elise Bauer’s recipe: bake and let cool Place the buns on the center rack of a preheated 400°F oven and bake for 10-12 minutes, or until they are lightly browned. Remove the buns from the oven and allow them to rest on the pan for a few minutes before transferring them to a wire rack to cool completely.Elise Bauer Elise Bauer’s recipe calls for making and piping icing in a cross design on buns. Wait until the buns have cooled completely before painting a cross on the top of them (or the frosting will run). In a separate bowl, whisk together the milk and powdered sugar. Continue to add powdered sugar until the mixture has a thick consistency. Place in a sandwich bag made of plastic. Snip a little bit off the corner of the bag and use it to pipe two lines of frosting across each bun to form a cross pattern on the top of each bun. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry. Elise Bauer is a woman who works in the fashion industry.
Nutrition Facts(per serving)
203 Calories
5g Fat
35g Carbs
6g Protein

The yeast must be proofed. 1/4 cup of the warmed milk and one teaspoon of sugar should be combined in a mixing dish before serving. Remove from heat and let aside for 5-10 minutes, or until the yeast has foamed (see note). Whisk the dry ingredients together with Elise Bauer’s assistance. Combine 3 cups of the flour (reserving more flour for a subsequent stage), the salt, spices, and 1/4 cup of sugar in a large basin or the mixing bowl of an electric mixer on high speed until well combined. Elise Bauer is a young woman who has a passion for fashion and beauty.

  1. To make a well in the flour, pour in the frothy yeast, softened butter and eggs, as well as the remaining milk, and stir until everything is well-combined.
  2. Shaggy and sticky is the best description for the combo.
  3. Elise Bauer is a young woman who has a passion for fashion and beauty.
  4. Knead the dough, adding extra flour if necessary.
  5. In the absence of a mixer, knead with your hands.
  6. Kneading time should be around 7 minutes in a mixer, or 10 minutes by hand.
  7. Allow the dough to rise for 2 hours at room temperature (or in a warm location) until it has doubled in size.

The buns are made by Elise Bauer.

Fold in half and cut in half again to make a log form out of the dough.

Remove half of the dough from the mixer and divide it into eight equal pieces.

Again, wrap the dough in plastic wrap and proceed to divide the remaining dough into 8 equal pieces, which should be placed in mounds on a baking sheet and wrapped in plastic again.

Bake at 400°F for 10 minutes, brushing with egg wash.

The tops of the buns can be scored with a knife to create a cross design if you so want.

The egg wash should be applied to the dough mounds with a pastry brush.

Baker Elise Bauer’s recipe for baking and cooling Preheat the oven to 400°F and bake the buns for 10-12 minutes, or until they are gently browned on the bottoms.

Make sure that the buns have completely cooled before you paint a cross on top of them (or the frosting will run).

Maintain a thick consistency by adding powdered sugar in little amounts at a time.

Snip a little bit off the corner of the bag and use it to pipe two lines of frosting across each bun to form a cross pattern on top of the buns. Elise Bauer is a young woman who has a passion for fashion and beauty. Elise Bauer is a young woman who lives in the United States.

Nutrition Facts
Servings: 16
Amount per serving
Calories 203
% Daily Value*
Total Fat5g 6%
Saturated Fat 2g 12%
Cholesterol44mg 15%
Sodium155mg 7%
Total Carbohydrate35g 13%
Dietary Fiber 2g 9%
Total Sugars 12g
Protein6g
Vitamin C 1mg 4%
Calcium 35mg 3%
Iron 2mg 10%
Potassium 162mg 3%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

The yeast must be proofed before use. 1/4 cup of the warmed milk and one teaspoon of sugar are combined in a mixing basin. Sprinkle the yeast over the milk and allow it to rest for 5-10 minutes, or until it begins to bubble up. Elise Bauer prepares the dry ingredients by whisking them. Combine 3 cups of the flour (reserving more flour for a subsequent step), the salt, spices, and 1/4 cup of sugar in a large basin or the mixing bowl of an electric mixer on high speed until thoroughly combined.

  • Elise Bauer is responsible for making the dough.
  • Stir until everything is thoroughly combined.
  • The finished product should be shaggy and sticky.
  • Elise Bauer is a young woman who has a lot of potential.
  • Elise Bauer: Knead the dough, adding extra flour if necessary, until it is smooth.
  • (If you don’t have a mixer, you can knead with your hands.) Slowly sprinkle in extra flour, a tablespoon at a time, kneading to integrate after each addition, until the flour is still somewhat sticky but is no longer entirely adhering to your fingertips when you work with it.
  • Allow for a two-hour waiting period for the size to double (first rise) Using plastic wrap, form a ball of dough in the bowl.

Elise Bauer is a young woman who has a lot of potential.

Gently press down on the dough to allow it to become more compact.

Place one half of the dough back into the bowl while you work on the other half of the dough.

Take the separate pieces and flatten them into mounds on a prepared baking sheet, spacing them 1 1/2 inches away from each other.

Elise Bauer; allow to rest for 30-40 minutes (second rise) Allow the dough mounds to rest at room temperature (or in a warm spot) for 30-40 minutes, or until they have doubled in size.

Elise Bauer Prepare egg wash by whisking together one egg and one tablespoon of milk in a small bowl until smooth.

You’ll want to make very deep cuts in order for the pattern to be seen after they’re finished.

When they are cooked, the egg wash will give them a lustrous look.

Remove the buns from the oven and let them to rest for a few minutes on the pan before transferring them to a wire rack to cool completely.Elise Bauer Elise Bauer’s recipe calls for making and piping icing in a cross design onto buns.

Combine the milk and powdered sugar in a mixing bowl.

Place in a plastic sandwich bag to keep it fresh. Remove a little bit of frosting from the corner of the bag and pipe two lines of icing across each bun to form a cross. Elise Bauer is a young woman who has a lot of potential. Elise Bauer is a young woman who lives in New York City.

Here’s Why We Eat Hot Cross Buns at Easter

Activate the yeast by adding water. 1/4 cup of the heated milk and one teaspoon of sugar are combined in a mixing basin. Sprinkle the yeast over the milk and let it to sit for 5-10 minutes, or until it becomes frothy. Elise Bauer: Whisk together the dry ingredients. In a large mixing basin or the bowl of an electric mixer, briskly whisk together 3 cups of the flour (reserving more flour for a subsequent step), the salt, spices, and 1/4 cup of the sugar until well combined. Elise Bauer is a model and actress.

  • Mix thoroughly.
  • The texture of the mixture should be shaggy and rather sticky.
  • Elise Bauer is a model and actress.
  • Elise Bauer: Knead the dough, adding extra flour if necessary.
  • (If you are not using a mixer, knead the dough with your hands.) Slowly sprinkle in extra flour, a tablespoon at a time, kneading to integrate after each addition, until the flour is still somewhat sticky but does not adhere to your fingers when you work with it.
  • Allow the dough to rise for 2 hours, covered, at room temperature (or in a warm location).
  • Elise Bauer will form the buns.

Roll the ball of dough into a log form and cut it into two pieces.

Take the dough half that you are now working with and divide it into 8 equal pieces.

Cover with plastic wrap and then divide the remaining dough into 8 equal pieces and arrange them in mounds on a baking sheet, again covering with plastic wrap.

Elise Bauer; Preheat oven to 400°F; brush with egg wash Prepare egg wash by whisking together one egg and one tablespoon of milk in a small bowl.

You’ll need to make very deep cuts in order for the pattern to be seen after they’re finished.

When cooked, the egg wash will give them a gleaming sheen.

Remove the buns from the oven and let them to rest for a few minutes on the baking sheet before transferring them to a wire rack to cool completely.Elise Bauer Elise Bauer: Prepare and pipe icing in a cross design on buns.

Combine the milk and powdered sugar in a separate bowl.

Continue to add powdered sugar until you get a thick consistency. Place in a plastic sandwich bag to protect from light. Snip a little bit off the corner of the bag and use it to pipe two lines of frosting across each bun to form a cross. Elise Bauer is a model and actress. Elise Bauer;

What Exactly Are Hot Cross Buns?

Hot cross buns are sweet yeasted buns that are gently spiced and studded with raisins or currants before being marked on top with a cross that is either piped in icing or etched into the dough. They are traditionally made for Easter. Despite the fact that hot cross buns are now available and eaten throughout the year, they were formerly only available on Good Friday. Hot cross buns make their way to our table around Easter, but there isn’t a single reason for why this happens. Some beliefs are based on Christian symbolism, albeit there are a variety of myths (and even some fairy tales) regarding how these theories came to be developed.

Some of the stories that have been told about hot cross buns are included here.

1. A 12th-century monk introduced the cross to the bun.

The roots of hot cross buns may date back to the 12th century, according to certain sources. According to the legend, the buns were prepared by an Anglican monk and marked with a cross in honor of Good Friday to commemorate the occasion. Over time, they rose in popularity and finally came to be recognized as a symbol of the Easter holiday.

2. Hot cross buns gained popularity in Elizabethan England.

As long back as the 12th century, it is possible that hot cross buns were first made. Apparently, the buns were prepared by an Anglican monk in commemoration of Good Friday, and they were marked with a cross. They rose in popularity throughout time, and finally became synonymous with the Easter weekend.

3. Superstitions about hot cross buns baked on Good Friday.

More than a few legends have also been circulated suggesting that hot cross buns were prepared on Good Friday for superstitious reasons. According to one legend, buns prepared on this day and strung from the rafters of a house will fend off evil spirits for the remainder of the calendar year. On another occasion, it is claimed that these buns safeguard sailors from shipwreck while they are at sea. Another version states that sharing the bun with a loved one ensures that the two of you will remain friends in the following year.

Have you ever experimented with creating your own?

Graduate of the French Culinary Institute, she has written many cookbooks, including Plant-Based Buddha Bowls, The Probiotic Kitchen, Buddhism in the Kitchen, and Everyday Freekeh Meals.

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5 Great Historical Myths And Traditions About Hot Cross Buns, a Pre-Easter Pastry

Photograph courtesy of I Love Images/CorbisDelicious It is customary to have hot cross buns (those doughy, raisin-studded pleasures) throughout Lent, particularly in the week leading up to Easter. They’ve been a Christmas tradition in certain towns for generations, and they’re usually marked with an icing or dough cross on top. (Hot cross buns were even made in ancient Greece, according to certain sources.) The lengthy history of the baked product has provided sufficient opportunity for folklore and superstitions to emerge and spread around it.

  1. According to IrishCentral, this monk prepared the buns on Good Friday in anticipation of the forthcoming Easter festival, and they quickly acquired popularity throughout England as a symbol of the holiday weekend.
  2. Nowadays, the cross may be constructed of chocolate icing or cream, but historically, it is formed of a basic dough or simply an impression carved with a knife to signify the occasion.
  3. If you hang a hot cross bun from the rafters of your kitchen on Good Friday, according to folklore, the bread will remain fresh and mold-free for the rest of the year.
  4. It is recommended that the bun be changed on Good Friday every year.
  5. They are capable of expelling evil spirits.
  6. They are also thought to prevent kitchen fires from erupting and to ensure that all loaves prepared during that year would turn out wonderfully delicious, according to legend.
  7. In addition, friendships are strengthened.
  8. It is captured in the following phrase from an old rhyme, according to Irish Central: “Good luck shall be divided between us two, half for you and half for me.” They’re too precious to consume on a regular basis.
  9. The cookies had just become too wonderful to consume on any other day.

So, now it’s your turn to relax and enjoy yourself! You may either purchase them or manufacture them yourself. EasterFoodReligionToday’s Hottest TrendsRecommended Videos

Hot Cross Buns

Traditional baking spices, citrus zest, and raisins give theseHot Cross Buns a delightful flavor that will get you out of bed in the morning! We never had Hot Cross Buns as a family growing up for whatever reason. We just did not have them on our radar. However, when we first arrived in New York State, some ten (or eleven?) years ago, I recall coming into a package of Hot Cross Buns at the grocery store when food shopping. I decided to buy a bundle since they looked delectable. Unfortunately, they looked far nicer than they tasted, as is common with many baked foods found in grocery shops.

  • It was stale and boring, and I couldn’t understand the public’s fascination with king cakes in the first place.
  • King cakes from the grocery store are no longer an option for me.
  • I went to the grocery shop to pick up that item, and once again, I was quite dissatisfied.
  • Traditionally eaten on Good Friday, Hot Cross Buns are spicy buns filled with a variety of fillings.
  • The history of these buns is a little obscure, as is the case with most traditional recipes.
  • Regardless of how the narrative begins, I can tell you with 100 percent confidence how it will finish — with me scarfing down a dozen or more rolls of toilet paper.
  • With the addition of orange and lemon zest, you’ve got yourself a delectable treat on your hands.

So the nursery song “Hot cross buns!” was inspired by this fact, as well.

One coin, two pennies—Hot cross buns, here we come!

We have a youngster, and while he assisted me in eating this batch of buns, I was definitely contributing as well!

That’s just the way I roll.

Roll?

Haha.

It is thought that eating Hot Cross Buns would bring you good fortune.

After then, the roll is replaced once a year.

Cheers, and best of luck in your baking endeavors! Is it possible that you baked a batch of these Hot Cross Buns at your house? Comment below, or take a photo and post it to Instagram (@Spicedblog) with the hashtag. I’d love to see what you come up with!

For the Buns

  • 114cupswarm milk
  • 1large egg
  • 112 teaspoonsvanilla extract
  • 3 cups golden raisins
  • 3 cups raisins
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • 4 cupsbread flour
  • 12 cupgranulated sugar
  • 214 teaspoon instant dry yeast (1 (1/4-oz. packet)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 112 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 12 teaspoon cloves
  • 14% teaspoon nutmeg
  • 4 tablespoonspunsalted buttersoftened
  • 112 teaspoon vanilla extract

For the Crosses

  • 114cupswarm milk
  • 1large egg
  • 112 teaspoonsvanilla extract
  • 3 cups golden raisins
  • 3 cups raisins
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • 4 cupsbread flour
  • 12 cupgranulated sugar
  • 214 teaspoon instant dry yeast (1 (1/4-oz. packet)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 112 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 12 teaspoon cloves
  • 14 teaspoon nutmeg

For the Glaze

  • Pour all of the ingredients into the bowl of a countertop mixer and mix on low speed until thoroughly blended
  • Add the instant dry yeast and mix on high speed until well incorporated. Separately, combine the butter, warm milk, egg, and vanilla extract in a large mixing bowl until thoroughly blended. In a mixing basin, combine the liquid mixture with the dry ingredients. Make use of the dough hook attachment to stir until the dough is starting to come together
  • Mix in the golden raisins, raisins, lemon zest, and orange zest until everything is well-combined, then remove from the heat. Pour the dough into a large greased mixing basin. Put a clean kitchen towel over the bowl and leave it in a warm spot until the dough has about doubled in size (about 1 hour). It’s important to note that I always leave my dough to rise in the oven with only the oven light on
  • Prepare a baking sheet by lining it with parchment paper and setting it aside. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and divide it into 12 equal halves. Start by flattening each piece of dough with your palm before pressing down on top with your other palm. Rotate the hand in a clockwise direction until the dough forms a ball. Place the dough balls on the prepared baking sheet at least 112″ apart. Using a baking spray, lightly coat the tops of the dough balls. Lightly wrap the tray with plastic wrap and set it aside in a warm spot for 60 minutes
  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. NOTE: If you are letting the dough rise in the oven, remove the baking sheet from the oven before preheating the oven.

For the Crosses

  • In a small mixing basin, combine the flour, powdered sugar, and water until well combined. Fill a piping bag or a sandwich bag with one corner cut off and pipe the mixture into the bag. Make a cross on the top of each roll with a pastry bag. Preheat the oven to 350°F and bake for 18-22 minutes, or until the buns are golden brown. The temperature of the rolls should be between 200 and 210 degrees Fahrenheit if you have an immediate read thermometer. Remove the baking pan from the oven and allow the rolls to cool slightly.

For the Glaze

  • Fill a microwave-safe bowl halfway with apricot jam and water. Microwave on high for 30 seconds. In 30-second intervals, stirring after each interval, heat the mixture until the jam has melted and the mixture has become smooth. While the rolls are still warm, brush the tops of the rolls with the glaze
  • Serve the buns warm or at room temperature.

Are you looking for more delectable Easter baking ideas? Take a look at some of our other picks as well: Orange Juice Cake is a cake made with orange juice. Biscuits with Cheddar and Ham Lemon Blueberry is a combination of lemon and blueberry. 7UP Pound Cake is a cake made with 7UP.

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