Where To Buy Potato Buns

Taste Test: Hamburger Buns

AT TARGET.COM: Martin’s Potato Sandwich Rolls, $3 for a box of 8 (available in the frozen section).

A Very, Very Close Second: Schmidt’s

Don’t get me wrong: I adore a good Martin’s burger. But I’ve only recently met Schmidt, and I want to remain a loyalist for the foreseeable future. As far as I was concerned, these rolls were far and away superior to the others in our taste test (although they were a very close second). Compared to Martin’s, they have a little more loft, but they still compress together to form the perfect portable vehicle for an abeef, mixed, or lamb burger, or any other burger you choose to shove in there. These buns were also less chewy than Martin’s, which has a propensity to linger in your tongue for somewhat longer periods of time.

BUY IT NOW: For example, Schmidt’s Potato Sandwich Rolls are $3.50 for a box of eight on Instacart.

What We Were Looking For

To be considered the finest hamburger bun, it needed to be soft without coming apart, have a decent balance of sweetness and savoriness, and have a good flavor without leaving an odd aftertaste. Not to mention that it had to be a potato roll. Despite the fact that we had a lesser number of samples than we normally use for taste testing, there was a great deal of variety across the competitors. Some of the buns had a bitter, chemically tinge to them after they were baked. Another was extremely sweet, to the point that it might have been used as filling for an ice cream sandwich.

(We were not duped in any way.)

How We Tested

Each packet of buns arrived at our headquarters in a state of frozen perfection. Once we had all of the buns in our possession, we kept them at room temperature for six hours to allow them to defrost completely. As a starting point for the tasting, we tried the buns as they were — untoasted, unadorned, un-anything — simply right out of the bag. This resulted in a number of quick eliminations. We put the buns to work now that the two front runners had been selected. First and foremost, a typical smashed cheeseburger topped with tomatoes, lettuce, and a secret sauce is served out to guests.

As a result of both of these tests, the Martin’s supporters supported team Martin’s, and the Schmidt’s fans supported team Schmidt, resulting in an overall triumph for the potato roll poster-children.

The Other Hamburger Buns We Tasted

  • Arnold Country Potato Sandwich Buns
  • Pepperidge Farm Farmhouse Rustic Potato Buns
  • Pepperidge Farm Bakery Classics Golden Potato Hamburger Buns
  • Vermont Bread Potato Burger Buns

All of the goods listed on Epicurious have been hand-picked by our editors and are of high quality.

If you make a purchase after clicking on one of our retail links, we may receive a small affiliate compensation.

Potato Buns – Klosterman Baking Company

Serving Size: 1 Bun
Servings per Container: 12
Toppings: Shine
Certifications: Kosher
Product Number: 3555
Frozen Case Number: 3554
Slice Profile: Sliced
Heel Slice Thickness: .75 in
Bun Profile: Round Top
Bun Weight: 82 g
Bun Type: Hamburger Buns
Bun Variety: Potato
Bun Size: 4.25 in.
Servings Per Frozen Case: 8 – 12 Count Pack (96 Buns per Case)

Contact Us

You may reach us by phone or email at any time of day or night. If you prefer, you may also schedule a time to come into our office. Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 4760 PaddockRoad Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 Phone:1 (877) 301-1004Email:[email protected] Location: 1 (877) 301-1004 Map

Potato Hamburger Buns

For more than a century, potatoes have been included with bread dough to provide nutrition and flavor. It also has a firm yet supple feel to its texture. Our Potato Hamburger Buns can withstand the most hearty burgers while yet maintaining a soft, chewy texture.

Features

  • Real potatoes were used in this recipe. Texture that is soft and pillowy in nature
  • Burger bun with a lightly sweet, yellow crumb
  • 4-inch hamburger bun with a 270-day shelf life when frozen
  • The distinct split top and glittering golden bun give this dress a one-of-a-kind appearance. Strong enough to withstand the weight of heavy fillings and sauces

Benefits

  • A dependable addition to your burger and sandwich menu
See also:  How To Steam Bao Buns

Preparation Instructions

  • Thaw at room temperature for 30 minutes, or reheat at 375°F for 2 minutes, depending on your preferences. Allow for 5 minutes of resting time before serving.

Product Details

For more than a century, potatoes have been included with bread dough to provide nutrition and flavor. It also has a firm yet supple feel to its texture. Our Potato Hamburger Buns can withstand the most hearty burgers while yet maintaining a soft, chewy texture.

Features

  • Real potatoes were used in this recipe. Texture that is soft and pillowy in nature
  • Burger bun with a lightly sweet, yellow crumb
  • 4-inch hamburger bun with a 270-day shelf life when frozen
  • The distinct split top and glittering golden bun give this dress a one-of-a-kind appearance. Strong enough to withstand the weight of heavy fillings and sauces

Benefits

  • A dependable addition to your burger and sandwich menu

Preparation Instructions

  • It is a hardworking addition to your burger and sandwich menu.

How Martin’s Potato Rolls Became the ‘It’ Burger Bun

Some restaurants have the pillowy-soft buns sent in from as far distant as 10,000 kilometers away, according to the menu. by March 1, 2017, 1:31 p.m. Eastern Standard Time Shake Shack is one of the few burger companies to have seen such a spectacular ascent. Since opening a single New York City location in 1999 and going public in 2010, the restaurant’s cult-like following can be attributed to a variety of factors — its signature Pat LaFrieda beef blend, those nostalgic crinkle fries, the “hospitality first” philosophy instilled by founder Danny Meyer — but there’s another culinary force at work that shouldn’t be overlooked: the pillowy-soft potato buns that hold its signature burger patties.

Martin’s potato rolls, which have been a favorite among East Coasters for more than 50 years, were created in Pennsylvania Dutch country in the 1950s.

Today, Martin’s potato rolls are sold to countries such as Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Russia, England, Italy, the Bahamas, Canada, Japan, and Australia.

In Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, the company’s family-owned and operated production facility still bakes every single one using a recipe that hasn’t changed much over the years — though, as Lucky Peach wrote in 2014, the facility has grown from a tiny garage in the 1950s to what today is “a state-of-the-art modern bakery, where buns and rolls are cranked out by towering machines.” Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe is a pastry shop that is well-known in the area.

But, given that “eat local” has become an unavoidable cliché and that specifying the origins of items on menus is virtually as frequent as giving prices, why are restaurants still electing to have bread sent in from as far away as 10,000 miles away?

The solution is a mixture of a few elements, which are as follows: There’s the Shake Shack impact, to be sure, but Martin’s potato rolls’ worldwide spread has also been propelled by nostalgia and the power of online word-of-mouth, to name a few of factors.

The Shake Shack Effect

Shake Shack has been using Martin’s potato rolls since its very first restaurant opened in New York City’s Madison Square Park in 2004, and has continued to do so today. According to Shake Shack culinary director Mark Rosati, “we wanted to replicate the traditional, straightforward burger that most people remember from their childhood.” In the early days, we tested a number of different buns and discovered that Martin’s was the best since it cradled the meat precisely and didn’t grow soggy as a result of absorbing the juices.

  • “It has a wonderful springiness and elasticity to it,” adds Rosati of the material’s texture.
  • “The Martin’s remains juicy and delicious.” In part, this is due to the potato starch, which absorbs more water than wheat starch and aids in its retention, allowing the buns to remain fresher for longer periods of time.
  • Each and every one of these sites serves burgers in the same manner as the original location: on a squishy Martin’s roll.
  • It was requested by the firm that Martin’s develop a non-GMO bun, and after various ingredient swaps, such as substituting soybean oil with sunflower oil, Martin’s successfully developed a GMO-free bun that was compliant with European Union requirements.
  • Shake Shack declined to provide specific figures on how many Martin’s buns it consumes each year, but with more than 100 locations, it’s safe to assume the chain consumes tens of millions of them each year.
  • In the words of Julie Martin, granddaughter of the company’s founders Lloyd and Lois Martin and now serving as the company’s social media manager, “We didn’t realize how much Martin’s was going to explode” when they first started utilizing their products.
  • The popularity of Shake Shack has also prompted other restaurants to use Martin’s potato rolls on their own menus as a result of Shake Shack’s success.
  • When you pair their bread with a burger, “there’s just something about it that’s magical.” “The meat, the salt, the savoriness — it’s just amazing,” he adds.
  • “Their standard burger bread is four inches in diameter, which is a little little for Texas,” Killen observes with a chuckle.

In 2011, Martin’s approached him about developing a bespoke bun to better accommodate his Texas-sized burgers, and after many trial iterations, they came up with the right five-inch potato roll, according to Killen.

The Nostalgia Factor

In 2004, when Shake Shack established its first store in New York City’s Madison Square Park, they began using Martin’s potato rolls, which they have continued to utilize ever since. Mark Rosati, Shake Shack’s culinary director, said that they sought to replicate the original, uncomplicated burger of most people’s childhoods. In the early days, we tested a number of different buns and discovered that Martin’s was the best since it cradled the meat precisely and didn’t go soggy as a result of the fluids absorbed.

  • When it comes to textural characteristics, Rosati describes them as “excellent springiness and suppleness.” “Other baked goods can get extremely, very dry if left out for a lengthy period of time.” Despite the fact that the Martin’s remains damp,” says the author.
  • Shake Shack began a massive worldwide growth spree in 2011, launching outlets in cities like as Dubai and Riyadh, and later in London and Tokyo.
  • That undertaking was not without its difficulties, which included the following.
  • It was requested by the firm that Martin’s develop a non-GMO bun, and after various ingredient swaps, such as substituting soybean oil with sunflower oil, Martin’s successfully developed a GMO-free bun that was compliant with EU laws.
  • Shake Shack declined to offer data on how many Martin’s buns it consumes each year, but with more than 100 locations, it’s reasonable to assume the chain consumes tens of millions of them on an annual basis.
  • Martin’s founders Lloyd and Lois Martin’s granddaughter Julie Martin, who now works as the company’s social media manager, says that when they first started using Martin’s they had no idea how much they were going to grow.
  • Martin’s potato rolls have become so popular at Shake Shack that other restaurants have begun to include them into their own menus.
  • When you pair their bread with a burger, “there’s just something about it that’s magical.” “The meat, the salt, the savoriness — it’s just amazing,” he explains.
  • “Their standard burger bread is four inches in diameter, which is a little little for Texas,” Killen observes with a grin.

It’s ten ounces, which is a lot of meat for that bread – it’s simply too much food.” In 2011, Martin’s approached him about developing a bespoke bun to better accommodate his Texas-sized burgers. After many prototypes, they came up with the perfect five-inch potato roll, according to Killen.

Insta-appeal

Martin’s potato rolls are well-known among those who grew up on them, but many others are just now becoming aware of them through a considerably more contemporary medium: the internet. According to Martin, “We are not a brand that spends a lot of money on advertisement.” In the past, we’ve relied on word of mouth; but, social media and the internet have expanded that reach significantly, and we now receive requests from individuals all over the world on a weekly basis. “I’ll receive a mail from someone in Sweden asking, ‘How can we obtain your rolls here?'” says the author.

  1. Since then, the site has featured the product multiple times in recipes and taste tests, establishing Martin’s rolls, which are somewhat sweet, as “the gold standard” for a fantastic burger bun.
  2. Kenji Lopez-Alt, culinary director of Serious Eats and author of The Food Lab, when asked about Martin’s meteoric surge in popularity.
  3. A Christmas gift list for burger fans was published by Serious Eats on their website in 2012, and Martin’s potato rolls were included in that suggestion (while Martin’s no longer provides e-commerce, the goods can still be purchased through Amazon).
  4. “We have a trademark appearance to our buns, and so people know it and say, ‘Oh, is that a Martin’s potato roll?'” says Julie Martin, who also credits the development of Instagram food porn.
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The Future of Martin’s

Of course, not everything is spread by word of mouth: While Martin’s does little in the way of traditional advertising, the company has pursued some strategic brand placement by sponsoring high-profile culinary events such as the South Beach WineFood Festival and World Food Festival events in Las Vegas and New York City. With its buns appearing in the festival’s high-profile “Burger Bash” competitions, the bakery establishes a connection with well-known chefs such as Bobby Flay and Masaharu Morimoto, resulting in increased visibility and prestige for the brand.

The fact that our rolls and bread are high in protein has led us to discover that they freeze exceptionally well, says Martin.

And while Martin’s is widely regarded as the pinnacle of burger buns, the company’s achievements don’t stop there: The Shake Shack chain, in addition to serving its Chicken Shack on potato buns, has recently started serving its hot dog on Martin’s hot dog buns, foregoing the authenticity of a Chicago-style poppy seed bun in favor of that familiar sweet squishiness.

Fuku Momofuku’s David Chang uses Martin’s rolls for his fried chicken sandwiches, which are served at Fuku (where the buns are steamed, rather than toasted).

Martin’s rolls are also popular for breakfast sandwiches.

I put forth my best effort.

“I can’t seem to get a hold of the squish,” Headley admitted to Grub Street.

Ms.

The following is Julie Martin’s statement: “Obviously, we hope for their continued success because we get to travel with them wherever they go.” Whitney Filloon works as a senior reporter for Eater. Daniela Galarza is the editor of this publication.

Hamburger Potato Buns

  1. Use a scale to weigh your flour, or measure it by carefully spooning it into a cup and brushing any excess off the top. Prepare the dough by combining all of the ingredients and kneading them until they form a soft dough — either by hand, mixer, or bread machine. In a lightly oiled mixing bowl, lay the dough and allow it to rise in a warm location for 1 hour, or until it has approximately doubled in mass
  2. Toss the dough out onto a lightly oiled board and gently deflate it before dividing it into six equal halves. Each component should be rolled into a ball. Using a flattening tool, carefully press the balls into the oiled cups of a hamburger bun pan. Alternatively, arrange them on a baking sheet that has been lightly oiled or lined with parchment paper, allowing approximately 2″ to 3″ between them
  3. Flatten slightly. Allow the buns to rise for 60 to 90 minutes, or until they have doubled in size. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit near the conclusion of the rising period. Baking time is 15 to 20 minutes, depending on how light golden brown you want your buns to be. Remove them from the oven and, if wanted, brush them with melted butter to finish them. Transfer the buns to a cooling rack to finish cooling. Buns may be stored at room temperature for several days if they are well-wrapped
  4. They can also be frozen for extended storage.
See also:  How To Warm Hot Dog Buns

Tips from our Bakers

  • If you want to top your buns with an aromatic, crispy, seedy topping, brush them with egg wash (1 large egg beaten with 1 tablespoon of water) and sprinkle with Everything Bagel Topping shortly before baking them.

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